Tax Law Rankings


diversity

I guess all the LLM programs mentioned in this forum accept foreign students.



Do you mean the International students without a JD degree? Will such students be recognized among employers only with a Tax LLM degree but not a JD degree?Do not know whether I have to get a JD first or go directly for Tax... thank you very much for your help~

<blockquote>I guess all the LLM programs mentioned in this forum accept foreign students. </blockquote>


Do you mean the International students without a JD degree? Will such students be recognized among employers only with a Tax LLM degree but not a JD degree?Do not know whether I have to get a JD first or go directly for Tax... thank you very much for your help~
ivan2006

All the major Tax LLM (NYU, Florida, GU - just to mention the Top 3) programs in the US admit foreign-trained students that hold a JD/ LLB equivalent degree. Regarding the recognition of such degree among employers, I think a foreign-trained Tax LLM has a fair chance to find a job (e.g. Big4, Law firms) if a) he attended one of the top schools in this field; b) has excellent grades in his LLM; c) has prior work experience.

All the major Tax LLM (NYU, Florida, GU - just to mention the Top 3) programs in the US admit foreign-trained students that hold a JD/ LLB equivalent degree. Regarding the recognition of such degree among employers, I think a foreign-trained Tax LLM has a fair chance to find a job (e.g. Big4, Law firms) if a) he attended one of the top schools in this field; b) has excellent grades in his LLM; c) has prior work experience.
diversity

All the major Tax LLM (NYU, Florida, GU - just to mention the Top 3) programs in the US admit foreign-trained students that hold a JD/ LLB equivalent degree. Regarding the recognition of such degree among employers, I think a foreign-trained Tax LLM has a fair chance to find a job (e.g. Big4, Law firms) if a) he attended one of the top schools in this field; b) has excellent grades in his LLM; c) has prior work experience.


Thank you very much for your detailed answer~ Is there any qualification exams required for the Tax practice? Such as the Bar Exam etc?

<blockquote>All the major Tax LLM (NYU, Florida, GU - just to mention the Top 3) programs in the US admit foreign-trained students that hold a JD/ LLB equivalent degree. Regarding the recognition of such degree among employers, I think a foreign-trained Tax LLM has a fair chance to find a job (e.g. Big4, Law firms) if a) he attended one of the top schools in this field; b) has excellent grades in his LLM; c) has prior work experience.</blockquote>

Thank you very much for your detailed answer~ Is there any qualification exams required for the Tax practice? Such as the Bar Exam etc?
ivan2006

No. However, if you find a job in the US (either Law Firm or Big4), you will be advised to sit for the Bar Exam (probably the NY Bar Exam, as many States do not allow foreign-trained attorneys to sit for the Bar Exam) further to the completion of the LLM.

No. However, if you find a job in the US (either Law Firm or Big4), you will be advised to sit for the Bar Exam (probably the NY Bar Exam, as many States do not allow foreign-trained attorneys to sit for the Bar Exam) further to the completion of the LLM.
Crash

New 2007 U.S. News Tax Rankings

U.S. News again ranks the Top 20 (21 with ties). The Top 5 schools with graduate tax programs are the same as last year:

* 1. NYU
* 2. Florida
* 3. Georgetown
* 4. Northwestern
* 5. Miami

The 12 schools with graduate tax programs included in the rankings are the same as last year, with only slight variations in their places in the rankings:

* 6. Boston University (#6 last year)
* 7. San Diego (#6)
* 8. University of Washington (#8)
* 9. SMU (#10)
* 10. Loyola-L.A. (#9)
* 10. Denver (#10)
* 10. Villanova (#10)

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2006/03/new_2007_us_new_1.html

New 2007 U.S. News Tax Rankings

U.S. News again ranks the Top 20 (21 with ties). The Top 5 schools with graduate tax programs are the same as last year:

* 1. NYU
* 2. Florida
* 3. Georgetown
* 4. Northwestern
* 5. Miami

The 12 schools with graduate tax programs included in the rankings are the same as last year, with only slight variations in their places in the rankings:

* 6. Boston University (#6 last year)
* 7. San Diego (#6)
* 8. University of Washington (#8)
* 9. SMU (#10)
* 10. Loyola-L.A. (#9)
* 10. Denver (#10)
* 10. Villanova (#10)

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2006/03/new_2007_us_new_1.html
rsarmiento

Hi Crash, where's Harvard? they were # 5 last year

Hi Crash, where's Harvard? they were # 5 last year
Publius00

Harvard isn't there because those rankings took U.S. News' rankings and deleted out the schools that don't have LL.Ms in tax.

If you go to the link where those "new" rankings came from, you'll see it was posted March 30, 2006. U.S. News will release their new 2008 rankings in about a month.

Harvard isn't there because those rankings took U.S. News' rankings and deleted out the schools that don't have LL.Ms in tax.

If you go to the link where those "new" rankings came from, you'll see it was posted March 30, 2006. U.S. News will release their new 2008 rankings in about a month.
rsarmiento

Thanks Publius00!

But what about Harvard's LLM with Concentration in Taxation, isn't this just as a LLM in tax?? or maybe not to good at all?

Thanks Publius00!

But what about Harvard's LLM with Concentration in Taxation, isn't this just as a LLM in tax?? or maybe not to good at all?
ivan2006

I´ve heard they had courses that focused more in Tax Policy issues than in the analysis of the Code and Regs. If you a government officer (and intends to go back to your home country after the LLM), it could be good.

I´ve heard they had courses that focused more in Tax Policy issues than in the analysis of the Code and Regs. If you a government officer (and intends to go back to your home country after the LLM), it could be good.
rsarmiento

Good point Ivan2006, here is the link that includes the curriculum (required and elective courses) for the LLM with Concentration in Taxation of HLS, it appears to be good but not to complete if I want to pursue a career in International Tax Services, what do you think?

http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/tax/llm.php

Good point Ivan2006, here is the link that includes the curriculum (required and elective courses) for the LLM with Concentration in Taxation of HLS, it appears to be good but not to complete if I want to pursue a career in International Tax Services, what do you think?

http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/tax/llm.php
ivan2006

I would say that you should stick to the top 3 schools in the US: NYU (best in the US and great reputation overseas), Florida (great faculty but not so known overseas) or Georgetown (good program - although not as good as NYU or Florida -, and great reputation overseas). Since for international students reputation abroad is a sensitive matter, I would say that I would pick 1) NYU, 2) Georgetown, 3) Florida. By specializing in taxation at HLS, you will have the privilege of being a Harvard alumnus, but should also face the fact that you may not be as sharp in US tax as you could be if you attended any of the top 3 schools.

I would say that you should stick to the top 3 schools in the US: NYU (best in the US and great reputation overseas), Florida (great faculty but not so known overseas) or Georgetown (good program - although not as good as NYU or Florida -, and great reputation overseas). Since for international students reputation abroad is a sensitive matter, I would say that I would pick 1) NYU, 2) Georgetown, 3) Florida. By specializing in taxation at HLS, you will have the privilege of being a Harvard alumnus, but should also face the fact that you may not be as sharp in US tax as you could be if you attended any of the top 3 schools.
diversity

I would say that you should stick to the top 3 schools in the US: NYU (best in the US and great reputation overseas), Florida (great faculty but not so known overseas) or Georgetown (good program - although not as good as NYU or Florida -, and great reputation overseas). Since for international students reputation abroad is a sensitive matter, I would say that I would pick 1) NYU, 2) Georgetown, 3) Florida. By specializing in taxation at HLS, you will have the privilege of being a Harvard alumnus, but should also face the fact that you may not be as sharp in US tax as you could be if you attended any of the top 3 schools.


What do you mean that "reputation abroad is very sensitive"? For international to work in US or going back in there hometown?

<blockquote>I would say that you should stick to the top 3 schools in the US: NYU (best in the US and great reputation overseas), Florida (great faculty but not so known overseas) or Georgetown (good program - although not as good as NYU or Florida -, and great reputation overseas). Since for international students reputation abroad is a sensitive matter, I would say that I would pick 1) NYU, 2) Georgetown, 3) Florida. By specializing in taxation at HLS, you will have the privilege of being a Harvard alumnus, but should also face the fact that you may not be as sharp in US tax as you could be if you attended any of the top 3 schools. </blockquote>

What do you mean that "reputation abroad is very sensitive"? For international to work in US or going back in there hometown?
ivan2006

In the US, UF´s Tax LLM is quite prestigious - but overseas, it is not a well-known university. So you may find out that in interviews with non-US employers, you have to explain that UF is #2, etc. I will tell you a personal story: some years ago, I met a UF graduate in Europe. I did not know too much about the Tax LLMs in the US at that time, and when he told me that he studied at UF (adding immediately that it was #2 in the US), I remember I thought whether it was true or not... Now I would never think this way, as I know they have a great program. But the bottom-line is: in Europe or South America (just to mention regions I know better), maybe the tax practitioners that studied in the US know that UF has a fine LLM, but not everybody knows that.

In the US, UF´s Tax LLM is quite prestigious - but overseas, it is not a well-known university. So you may find out that in interviews with non-US employers, you have to explain that UF is #2, etc. I will tell you a personal story: some years ago, I met a UF graduate in Europe. I did not know too much about the Tax LLMs in the US at that time, and when he told me that he studied at UF (adding immediately that it was #2 in the US), I remember I thought whether it was true or not... Now I would never think this way, as I know they have a great program. But the bottom-line is: in Europe or South America (just to mention regions I know better), maybe the tax practitioners that studied in the US know that UF has a fine LLM, but not everybody knows that.
rsarmiento

I totally agree with you Ivan2006, for instance, if I seek employment at any of the big 4 firms or at any top law firm with offices outside the US (which provide International Tax Services), they will definitely be familiar with UF's reputation in that field.


In the US, UF´s Tax LLM is quite prestigious - but overseas, it is not a well-known university. So you may find out that in interviews with non-US employers, you have to explain that UF is #2, etc. I will tell you a personal story: some years ago, I met a UF graduate in Europe. I did not know too much about the Tax LLMs in the US at that time, and when he told me that he studied at UF (adding immediately that it was #2 in the US), I remember I thought whether it was true or not... Now I would never think this way, as I know they have a great program. But the bottom-line is: in Europe or South America (just to mention regions I know better), maybe the tax practitioners that studied in the US know that UF has a fine LLM, but not everybody knows that.

I totally agree with you Ivan2006, for instance, if I seek employment at any of the big 4 firms or at any top law firm with offices outside the US (which provide International Tax Services), they will definitely be familiar with UF's reputation in that field.


<blockquote>In the US, UF´s Tax LLM is quite prestigious - but overseas, it is not a well-known university. So you may find out that in interviews with non-US employers, you have to explain that UF is #2, etc. I will tell you a personal story: some years ago, I met a UF graduate in Europe. I did not know too much about the Tax LLMs in the US at that time, and when he told me that he studied at UF (adding immediately that it was #2 in the US), I remember I thought whether it was true or not... Now I would never think this way, as I know they have a great program. But the bottom-line is: in Europe or South America (just to mention regions I know better), maybe the tax practitioners that studied in the US know that UF has a fine LLM, but not everybody knows that. </blockquote>
ztp

anyone who knows anything about tax will know UF is great. If they dont, and all you are looking to do is say I have adegree from XYZ university, go to GT. However, an LLM from XYZ is not going to get you in the door of Biglaw just because it is XYZ. They look at undergrad law schools much more.

anyone who knows anything about tax will know UF is great. If they dont, and all you are looking to do is say I have adegree from XYZ university, go to GT. However, an LLM from XYZ is not going to get you in the door of Biglaw just because it is XYZ. They look at undergrad law schools much more.
ivan2006

My comment was addressed only to the situation where a foreign student is looking for a job abroad. As I said, i think UF has a great program - the only downside is that it is not that well-known overseas.

My comment was addressed only to the situation where a foreign student is looking for a job abroad. As I said, i think UF has a great program - the only downside is that it is not that well-known overseas.
pancake

Agree. I heard a UF ITP LLM got a job in one of the big 4 with pretty good compensation package.
Ivan, do you know more about tax llm's prospective job market? What's the chance for BIGLAW and is Big 4 also a decent choice? Thx.

Agree. I heard a UF ITP LLM got a job in one of the big 4 with pretty good compensation package.
Ivan, do you know more about tax llm's prospective job market? What's the chance for BIGLAW and is Big 4 also a decent choice? Thx.
ivan2006

The big differences between a big 4 and big law firms are prestige and salary (let´s say that while big law firms in NY offer 160K a year, big 4 offers 90K; if you have prior experience and you negotiate well, you may raise this up to 100K). However, if you have no prior experience in taxation, Big 4 can be a great school (I began my career at a Big4 myself). And regarding the money, 90K is ok, you can live with that here in NY. So I think a Big4 is also a very good option.
It is important to know that not everybody has a chance to receive offers big law firms: only the students with top grades will have a decent chance.

The big differences between a big 4 and big law firms are prestige and salary (let´s say that while big law firms in NY offer 160K a year, big 4 offers 90K; if you have prior experience and you negotiate well, you may raise this up to 100K). However, if you have no prior experience in taxation, Big 4 can be a great school (I began my career at a Big4 myself). And regarding the money, 90K is ok, you can live with that here in NY. So I think a Big4 is also a very good option.
It is important to know that not everybody has a chance to receive offers big law firms: only the students with top grades will have a decent chance.
diversity

The big differences between a big 4 and big law firms are prestige and salary (let´s say that while big law firms in NY offer 160K a year, big 4 offers 90K; if you have prior experience and you negotiate well, you may raise this up to 100K). However, if you have no prior experience in taxation, Big 4 can be a great school (I began my career at a Big4 myself). And regarding the money, 90K is ok, you can live with that here in NY. So I think a Big4 is also a very good option.
It is important to know that not everybody has a chance to receive offers big law firms: only the students with top grades will have a decent chance.


Ivan, you are very imformative! You mentioned about the work experience in Taxation, do you specificly mean experience in Big Four in home countries? Will piror Big 4 taxation experience be a definite plus of getting in Big 4 again after LLM? Thanks!

<blockquote>The big differences between a big 4 and big law firms are prestige and salary (let´s say that while big law firms in NY offer 160K a year, big 4 offers 90K; if you have prior experience and you negotiate well, you may raise this up to 100K). However, if you have no prior experience in taxation, Big 4 can be a great school (I began my career at a Big4 myself). And regarding the money, 90K is ok, you can live with that here in NY. So I think a Big4 is also a very good option.
It is important to know that not everybody has a chance to receive offers big law firms: only the students with top grades will have a decent chance. </blockquote>

Ivan, you are very imformative! You mentioned about the work experience in Taxation, do you specificly mean experience in Big Four in home countries? Will piror Big 4 taxation experience be a definite plus of getting in Big 4 again after LLM? Thanks!
ivan2006

The big differences between a big 4 and big law firms are prestige and salary (let´s say that while big law firms in NY offer 160K a year, big 4 offers 90K; if you have prior experience and you negotiate well, you may raise this up to 100K). However, if you have no prior experience in taxation, Big 4 can be a great school (I began my career at a Big4 myself). And regarding the money, 90K is ok, you can live with that here in NY. So I think a Big4 is also a very good option.
It is important to know that not everybody has a chance to receive offers big law firms: only the students with top grades will have a decent chance.


Ivan, you are very imformative! You mentioned about the work experience in Taxation, do you specificly mean experience in Big Four in home countries? Will piror Big 4 taxation experience be a definite plus of getting in Big 4 again after LLM? Thanks!


Yes. If you have a background in Big4 in your home country, it would definitely be an advantage if you want to land a job at a Big4 here in the US. At the end of the day, you will know their culture and they will think you have the right fit there. If you come from a Big 4, you will know what I mean... On the other hand, the transition between Big 4 and a law firm could be more complicated.

<blockquote><blockquote>The big differences between a big 4 and big law firms are prestige and salary (let´s say that while big law firms in NY offer 160K a year, big 4 offers 90K; if you have prior experience and you negotiate well, you may raise this up to 100K). However, if you have no prior experience in taxation, Big 4 can be a great school (I began my career at a Big4 myself). And regarding the money, 90K is ok, you can live with that here in NY. So I think a Big4 is also a very good option.
It is important to know that not everybody has a chance to receive offers big law firms: only the students with top grades will have a decent chance. </blockquote>

Ivan, you are very imformative! You mentioned about the work experience in Taxation, do you specificly mean experience in Big Four in home countries? Will piror Big 4 taxation experience be a definite plus of getting in Big 4 again after LLM? Thanks!</blockquote>

Yes. If you have a background in Big4 in your home country, it would definitely be an advantage if you want to land a job at a Big4 here in the US. At the end of the day, you will know their culture and they will think you have the right fit there. If you come from a Big 4, you will know what I mean... On the other hand, the transition between Big 4 and a law firm could be more complicated.

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