Best Competition Law LLM program


MagnumOpus
Hi,
I am interested in pursuing competition law LLM and looking for a combination of law and economics. It would be great if I could get some suggestions.
I am open to law schools all over the world, just want a worthy program.
Hi,
I am interested in pursuing competition law LLM and looking for a combination of law and economics. It would be great if I could get some suggestions.
I am open to law schools all over the world, just want a worthy program.
quote
Brainy Smu...
Consider: BSC

Alternatives: FU, Leuphana, NYU, QMUL and UCL

Kind regards.
Consider: BSC

Alternatives: FU, Leuphana, NYU, QMUL and UCL

Kind regards.
quote
LiegeLLMSt...
I did the Competition and IP law LLM in Liège (Belgium) and would recommend it very highly for competition law.

It has many professors in common with the Brussels School of Competition but is geared towards full-time students whereas the BSC is more of an executive master's degree.

Here is the link to the programme's website:
http://local.droit.ulg.ac.be/sa/ieje/fileadmin/IEJE/Pdf/ULG-IEJEbr.pdf

In the US, I would recommend: Harvard, Yale, Chicago, Michigan, Berkeley, U.Penn, UVA, Georgetown and NYU. They all have strong antitrust course offerings.

Stanford and Columbia are fantastic law schools, but they don't offer as many antitrust courses.

This blog post by professor Geradin might be of interest (although it is a bit old):
http://professorgeradin.blogs.com/professor_geradins_weblog/2005/03/us_law_schools_.html
Since this post, Michigan has become much stronger for competition/antitrust law (they have K.U. Kuhn who was chief economist at DG comp).

In continental Europe, some of the strong programmes are: College of Bruges, Tilburg, etc. (there are many other good options).

I don't know the UK very well, but I suppose that Oxford, Cambridge, King's, UCL and LSE would all be excellent choices.
I did the Competition and IP law LLM in Liège (Belgium) and would recommend it very highly for competition law.

It has many professors in common with the Brussels School of Competition but is geared towards full-time students whereas the BSC is more of an executive master's degree.

Here is the link to the programme's website:
http://local.droit.ulg.ac.be/sa/ieje/fileadmin/IEJE/Pdf/ULG-IEJEbr.pdf

In the US, I would recommend: Harvard, Yale, Chicago, Michigan, Berkeley, U.Penn, UVA, Georgetown and NYU. They all have strong antitrust course offerings.

Stanford and Columbia are fantastic law schools, but they don't offer as many antitrust courses.

This blog post by professor Geradin might be of interest (although it is a bit old):
http://professorgeradin.blogs.com/professor_geradins_weblog/2005/03/us_law_schools_.html
Since this post, Michigan has become much stronger for competition/antitrust law (they have K.U. Kuhn who was chief economist at DG comp).

In continental Europe, some of the strong programmes are: College of Bruges, Tilburg, etc. (there are many other good options).

I don't know the UK very well, but I suppose that Oxford, Cambridge, King's, UCL and LSE would all be excellent choices.
quote
MagnumOpus
Thanks a ton for this very informative reply LiegeLLMStudent . It was very helpful.
After reading up about Liege, I wanted to know if it was compulsory to take a few courses in French. I am an Indian and hence only fluent in English. Same query goes for the College of Europe, Bruges.
Thanks a ton for this very informative reply LiegeLLMStudent . It was very helpful.
After reading up about Liege, I wanted to know if it was compulsory to take a few courses in French. I am an Indian and hence only fluent in English. Same query goes for the College of Europe, Bruges.
quote
LiegeLLMSt...
Hi, Liège now offer a full English programme:
http://local.droit.ulg.ac.be/sa/ieje/fileadmin/IEJE/Pdf/Full-English%20Programme-LLMBrochure.pdf

The downside is that two courses are outsourced: one to the BSC (state aid) and one to Lille (Prof Petit's competition law course).

The cost of commuting shouldn't be too much of an issue if you take into account the very low tuition fees. But I can imagine that it might be a bit of a drag (fyi, I attended the programme and commuted from Brussels).

Otherwise, it is compulsory to take some French courses.

I don't know Bruges that well, but I believe that you have to take some French courses (I may be wrong).

The huge plus point about Liège is the small LLM group, the fact that professor Petit is one of the very best European competition law scholars and the low tuition fees.

You can read his (and Alfonso Lamadrid's) blog if you need convincing:
http://chillingcompetition.com/
Hi, Liège now offer a full English programme:
http://local.droit.ulg.ac.be/sa/ieje/fileadmin/IEJE/Pdf/Full-English%20Programme-LLMBrochure.pdf

The downside is that two courses are outsourced: one to the BSC (state aid) and one to Lille (Prof Petit's competition law course).

The cost of commuting shouldn't be too much of an issue if you take into account the very low tuition fees. But I can imagine that it might be a bit of a drag (fyi, I attended the programme and commuted from Brussels).

Otherwise, it is compulsory to take some French courses.

I don't know Bruges that well, but I believe that you have to take some French courses (I may be wrong).

The huge plus point about Liège is the small LLM group, the fact that professor Petit is one of the very best European competition law scholars and the low tuition fees.

You can read his (and Alfonso Lamadrid's) blog if you need convincing:
http://chillingcompetition.com/
quote
MagnumOpus
That sounds great! I am in a dilemma choosing between European schools and American schools.
Is it true that BSC only accepts students having a masters in law or economics? Their website does say so, but I was wondering if I missed out something while researching on colleges.
That sounds great! I am in a dilemma choosing between European schools and American schools.
Is it true that BSC only accepts students having a masters in law or economics? Their website does say so, but I was wondering if I missed out something while researching on colleges.
quote
Tristan
In the US: Harvard, Yale, Chicago, Stanford, U.Penn....Chicago and Harvard have, arguably, the best econ departments in the world, and I hear their law schools are not bad either =)
In the US: Harvard, Yale, Chicago, Stanford, U.Penn....Chicago and Harvard have, arguably, the best econ departments in the world, and I hear their law schools are not bad either =)
quote
I did the Competition and IP law LLM in Liège (Belgium) and would recommend it very highly for competition law.

It has many professors in common with the Brussels School of Competition but is geared towards full-time students whereas the BSC is more of an executive master's degree.

Here is the link to the programme's website:
http://local.droit.ulg.ac.be/sa/ieje/fileadmin/IEJE/Pdf/ULG-IEJEbr.pdf

In the US, I would recommend: Harvard, Yale, Chicago, Michigan, Berkeley, U.Penn, UVA, Georgetown and NYU. They all have strong antitrust course offerings.

Stanford and Columbia are fantastic law schools, but they don't offer as many antitrust courses.

This blog post by professor Geradin might be of interest (although it is a bit old):
http://professorgeradin.blogs.com/professor_geradins_weblog/2005/03/us_law_schools_.html
Since this post, Michigan has become much stronger for competition/antitrust law (they have K.U. Kuhn who was chief economist at DG comp).

In continental Europe, some of the strong programmes are: College of Bruges, Tilburg, etc. (there are many other good options).

I don't know the UK very well, but I suppose that Oxford, Cambridge, King's, UCL and LSE would all be excellent choices.


May I follow up with a question...I am very interested in competition law as well. For the US law schools you recommended, do they have specific competition law LLM programs or only general LLM programs, but with outstanding competition law courses?
<blockquote>I did the Competition and IP law LLM in Liège (Belgium) and would recommend it very highly for competition law.

It has many professors in common with the Brussels School of Competition but is geared towards full-time students whereas the BSC is more of an executive master's degree.

Here is the link to the programme's website:
http://local.droit.ulg.ac.be/sa/ieje/fileadmin/IEJE/Pdf/ULG-IEJEbr.pdf

In the US, I would recommend: Harvard, Yale, Chicago, Michigan, Berkeley, U.Penn, UVA, Georgetown and NYU. They all have strong antitrust course offerings.

Stanford and Columbia are fantastic law schools, but they don't offer as many antitrust courses.

This blog post by professor Geradin might be of interest (although it is a bit old):
http://professorgeradin.blogs.com/professor_geradins_weblog/2005/03/us_law_schools_.html
Since this post, Michigan has become much stronger for competition/antitrust law (they have K.U. Kuhn who was chief economist at DG comp).

In continental Europe, some of the strong programmes are: College of Bruges, Tilburg, etc. (there are many other good options).

I don't know the UK very well, but I suppose that Oxford, Cambridge, King's, UCL and LSE would all be excellent choices.</blockquote>

May I follow up with a question...I am very interested in competition law as well. For the US law schools you recommended, do they have specific competition law LLM programs or only general LLM programs, but with outstanding competition law courses?
quote
MagnumOpus
Hi larryzhouquan,
NYU has a specialized LLM in Competition, Innovation and Information law but other than that I don't see any other school offering a specialisation.
Hi larryzhouquan,
NYU has a specialized LLM in Competition, Innovation and Information law but other than that I don't see any other school offering a specialisation.
quote
Hello to everybody, this post was very helpful to me when I was applying. So far, I was accepted at Northwestern, Georgetown and Michigan. Regarding antitrust, which school has the strongestprogram?. My focus is antitrust, enforcement in anticorruption and public policies.
Hello to everybody, this post was very helpful to me when I was applying. So far, I was accepted at Northwestern, Georgetown and Michigan. Regarding antitrust, which school has the strongestprogram?. My focus is antitrust, enforcement in anticorruption and public policies.
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

Brussels, Belgium 36 Followers 9 Discussions
Lüneburg, Germany 5 Followers 2 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 795 Followers 802 Discussions
Liège, Belgium 69 Followers 36 Discussions
Cambridge, Massachusetts 998 Followers 849 Discussions
New Haven, Connecticut 284 Followers 361 Discussions
Chicago, Illinois 498 Followers 306 Discussions
Ann Arbor, Michigan 240 Followers 194 Discussions
Berkeley, California 1079 Followers 545 Discussions
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 739 Followers 463 Discussions
Charlottesville, Virginia 194 Followers 200 Discussions
Washington, District of Columbia 935 Followers 896 Discussions
New York City, New York 1825 Followers 1521 Discussions
Oxford, United Kingdom 718 Followers 777 Discussions
Cambridge, United Kingdom 659 Followers 696 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 684 Followers 874 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 511 Followers 858 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 637 Followers 866 Discussions
Stanford, California 677 Followers 380 Discussions

Related Articles

The LL.M. in Competition Law

Aug 19, 2010

An international and comparative perspective is key in this area of law. That's where an LL.M. can help.

More Articles

Hot Discussions