The Magnificent 7 LL.M. Locations


On Friday, I gave details of the Forbes.Com listing of the 14 most aestheticially pleasing universities. Of the 14 colleges in the list, only 7 offer LL.M. degrees. I'm now publishing details of those 7 institutions (chosen by a panel of distinguished American architects and campus designers):

Oxford University, England
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Stanford University, USA
Tsinghua University,China
University of Virginia, USA
University of Bologna, Italy
Stanford University USA

Admittedly, this is a list chosen by a team of American architects. Which LL.M.-providing universities would you include in your list of luscious locations?
On Friday, I gave details of the Forbes.Com listing of the 14 most aestheticially pleasing universities. Of the 14 colleges in the list, only 7 offer LL.M. degrees. I'm now publishing details of those 7 institutions (chosen by a panel of distinguished American architects and campus designers):

Oxford University, England
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Stanford University, USA
Tsinghua University,China
University of Virginia, USA
University of Bologna, Italy
Stanford University USA

Admittedly, this is a list chosen by a team of American architects. Which LL.M.-providing universities would you include in your list of luscious locations?

quote
Sorry. Slight mistake. I refer to Stanford twice by accident. The seventh university on this list is Yale, New Haven, USA.

Must confess that I am surprised that Yale makes the cut, but Harvard does not. In the final analysis, however, the "Magnificent 7" were chosen by a panel of distinguished American architects. If it had been a group of (say) European architects, I've no doubt that the list would have been different.
Sorry. Slight mistake. I refer to Stanford twice by accident. The seventh university on this list is Yale, New Haven, USA.

Must confess that I am surprised that Yale makes the cut, but Harvard does not. In the final analysis, however, the "Magnificent 7" were chosen by a panel of distinguished American architects. If it had been a group of (say) European architects, I've no doubt that the list would have been different.
quote
quote
I suppose the point I'm making is that there are myriad different factors which influence a person in deciding where to study for an LL.M. degree. Undoubtedly, the academic reputation of the university (to which the candidate is applying) is if paramount importance. But, other factors, such as ambience, atmosphere and surroundings can also be of pivotal importance in making a choice.
I suppose the point I'm making is that there are myriad different factors which influence a person in deciding where to study for an LL.M. degree. Undoubtedly, the academic reputation of the university (to which the candidate is applying) is if paramount importance. But, other factors, such as ambience, atmosphere and surroundings can also be of pivotal importance in making a choice.

quote
Must confess that I am surprised that Yale makes the cut, but Harvard does not.


Have you visited both Yale and Harvard? I'm curious what about Harvard's architecture you find really aesthetically pleasing. The law school specifically is not very attractive overall. Of course, there are amazing aspects - Langdell Hall (the library) has a wonderful fourth-floor reading room; Austin Hall has the Ames courtroom; etc. But a lot of the buildings are contemporary and rather boring (Pound Hall, the "Hark" - student center, etc). There are also the Gropius dorms, on the edge of the campus, which are hideous. Yale's Sterling Law Building seems clearly preferable to me, on the whole, though obviously everyone has their own sense of taste. I'd extend these comments broadly to the two universities: Harvard has some strong points (Harvard Yard, Radcliffe Yard, etc.) but Yale offers an overall more beautiful campus.

Of course, if we're comparing Cambridge, MA to New Haven, CT, most people would agree that Harvard gets the nod. ;)
<blockquote>Must confess that I am surprised that Yale makes the cut, but Harvard does not. </blockquote>

Have you visited both Yale and Harvard? I'm curious what about Harvard's architecture you find really aesthetically pleasing. The law school specifically is not very attractive overall. Of course, there are amazing aspects - Langdell Hall (the library) has a wonderful fourth-floor reading room; Austin Hall has the Ames courtroom; etc. But a lot of the buildings are contemporary and rather boring (Pound Hall, the "Hark" - student center, etc). There are also the Gropius dorms, on the edge of the campus, which are hideous. Yale's Sterling Law Building seems clearly preferable to me, on the whole, though obviously everyone has their own sense of taste. I'd extend these comments broadly to the two universities: Harvard has some strong points (Harvard Yard, Radcliffe Yard, etc.) but Yale offers an overall more beautiful campus.

Of course, if we're comparing Cambridge, MA to New Haven, CT, most people would agree that Harvard gets the nod. ;)
quote
I find myself agreeing with you Cambridge. I have visited Harvard Law School and used the Langdell Reading Room for a couple of days. But, yes, the real reason I prefer Harvard is because it's situated in Cambridge MA (a satellite of the great city of Boston) and New Haven CT is not an inspiring or aesthetically pleasing town. So, I suppose if we are comparing Harvard with Yale purely on architectural terms within the universities themselves, your preference for Yale is well founded.
I find myself agreeing with you Cambridge. I have visited Harvard Law School and used the Langdell Reading Room for a couple of days. But, yes, the real reason I prefer Harvard is because it's situated in Cambridge MA (a satellite of the great city of Boston) and New Haven CT is not an inspiring or aesthetically pleasing town. So, I suppose if we are comparing Harvard with Yale purely on architectural terms within the universities themselves, your preference for Yale is well founded.
quote
Good Gosh
absolutely agree, from an aesthetic perspective yale>>>>harvard, especially the law schools..
absolutely agree, from an aesthetic perspective yale>>>>harvard, especially the law schools..
quote
cmars
If you choose locations including their towns, then the beauty of Yale (especially) and Oxford law schools is somewhat tainted by their industrial town surroundings. Both old and new (Harvard) Cambridge are far prettier.
But Constable only painted (pre-)Essex;-)))
http://lh6.ggpht.com/_SUBGzd1BG60/S0JhVydclsI/AAAAAAADqbo/YLCOvLBjEvc/Constable,%20Wivenhoe%20Park,%20Essex%201816.jpg
If you choose locations including their towns, then the beauty of Yale (especially) and Oxford law schools is somewhat tainted by their industrial town surroundings. Both old and new (Harvard) Cambridge are far prettier.
But Constable only painted (pre-)Essex;-)))
http://lh6.ggpht.com/_SUBGzd1BG60/S0JhVydclsI/AAAAAAADqbo/YLCOvLBjEvc/Constable,%20Wivenhoe%20Park,%20Essex%201816.jpg
quote
niknihc
Oxford law schools is somewhat tainted by their industrial town surroundings.


Have you been to Oxford? How many times, walking from College to Law Faculty or College to College or College to supermarket, did you come across "industrial" surroundings?

What nonsense.
<blockquote> Oxford law schools is somewhat tainted by their industrial town surroundings. </blockquote>

Have you <i> been </i> to Oxford? How many times, walking from College to Law Faculty or College to College or College to supermarket, did you come across "industrial" surroundings?

What nonsense.

quote
I would agree with the last poster that Oxford is a sublime place. And the Oxford colleges are located a good distance away from the industrial side of Oxford. The reality being that you could visit the university and be blissfully unaware that the "City of Dreaming Spires" ever housed a manufacturing industry. Having visited Oxford a couple of times (and a stayed there over the course of a week), I have to say that I agree with thr Forbes.com rating which places it amonst the most aesthetically pleasing universities in the world.
I would agree with the last poster that Oxford is a sublime place. And the Oxford colleges are located a good distance away from the industrial side of Oxford. The reality being that you could visit the university and be blissfully unaware that the "City of Dreaming Spires" ever housed a manufacturing industry. Having visited Oxford a couple of times (and a stayed there over the course of a week), I have to say that I agree with thr Forbes.com rating which places it amonst the most aesthetically pleasing universities in the world.
quote
cmars
The colleges are beautiful at Oxford, of course - and one side of the town (Jericho) is charming. But also bear in mind that many students live on Cowley Road which has masses of very good ethnic restaurants and is also en route to Cowley - Oxford's other side. Cowley is where the British car industry grew up - and is home to the Mini: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cowley,_Oxfordshire
Cambridge's biggest industry is the University Press or hi-tech industries.
I state that as a former, very contented (Jericho) Oxford resident who worked at Balliol.
The colleges are beautiful at Oxford, of course - and one side of the town (Jericho) is charming. But also bear in mind that many students live on Cowley Road which has masses of very good ethnic restaurants and is also en route to Cowley - Oxford's other side. Cowley is where the British car industry grew up - and is home to the Mini: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cowley,_Oxfordshire
Cambridge's biggest industry is the University Press or hi-tech industries.
I state that as a former, very contented (Jericho) Oxford resident who worked at Balliol.
quote
cmars
I would be happy to advise those posters who have never lived in the cities - often, life in colleges is very isolated from the real towns in which they are based. The expression 'Town versus Gown' captures the mutual incomprehension and tension that creates.
I would be happy to advise those posters who have never lived in the cities - often, life in colleges is very isolated from the real towns in which they are based. The expression 'Town versus Gown' captures the mutual incomprehension and tension that creates.
quote
I've only been to three of these "Magnificent 7" universities, namely Trinity (my alma mater), Oxford University and Stanford University. Of the three, I have to concede (reluctantly) that Oxford is in the highest league (at least aestheticallly speaking). In the West Coast, I also like Berkeley ; but it does not appear to have registered on the Forbes.com list of favoured locations.

Given the medieval buildings in Bologna, I'm not surprised that it features in the "Magnificent 7". And, according to this thread, Yale is also something special. Presumably the same is true of both Tsinghua and the University of Virginia?
I've only been to three of these "Magnificent 7" universities, namely Trinity (my alma mater), Oxford University and Stanford University. Of the three, I have to concede (reluctantly) that Oxford is in the highest league (at least aestheticallly speaking). In the West Coast, I also like Berkeley ; but it does not appear to have registered on the Forbes.com list of favoured locations.

Given the medieval buildings in Bologna, I'm not surprised that it features in the "Magnificent 7". And, according to this thread, Yale is also something special. Presumably the same is true of both Tsinghua and the University of Virginia?
quote
Just a brief update on this thread. For the benefit of the many people who are new to LL.M. Guide. Recently, a team of American architects and campus designers chose seven university campuses (all of whom provide LL.M. courses) which they deemed to be the most aesthetic (in terms of beautiful architecture and surroundings) in the world:

They chose the following seven campuses:

Tsinghua University, China
Yale University, USA
Oxford University, England
University of Virginia, USA
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Stanford University, USA
University of Bologna, Italy

This choice has generated a lot of correspondence and controversy in the correspondence columns of Forbes magazine. In recent weeks, an eighth university (offering LL.M. degrees) has been added to the above list. That university is Cambridge University in England.
Just a brief update on this thread. For the benefit of the many people who are new to LL.M. Guide. Recently, a team of American architects and campus designers chose seven university campuses (all of whom provide LL.M. courses) which they deemed to be the most aesthetic (in terms of beautiful architecture and surroundings) in the world:

They chose the following seven campuses:

Tsinghua University, China
Yale University, USA
Oxford University, England
University of Virginia, USA
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Stanford University, USA
University of Bologna, Italy

This choice has generated a lot of correspondence and controversy in the correspondence columns of Forbes magazine. In recent weeks, an eighth university (offering LL.M. degrees) has been added to the above list. That university is Cambridge University in England.

quote
Okay ebascom, off the top of my head, ten schools with good reputations:

Humboldt University Berlin (in the middle of one of the most happening cities in Europe)
Amsterdam University (also a great city in which to study)
Boston College Law School (downmarket compared to Harvard ; but Boston Coll has some talented professors on its staff)
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (medieval town in Belgium)
University of Copenhagen (good reputation)
Indiana University (well within the top 50 U.S. Law Schools)
Penn State University (great Faculty, good value in terms of fees charged)
Lund University (in Sweden, if you like cross-country skiing in winter, this could be the place for you)
University of San Diego (great beaches nearby)
University of Tokyo (after Fukushima has calmed down)
Okay ebascom, off the top of my head, ten schools with good reputations:

Humboldt University Berlin (in the middle of one of the most happening cities in Europe)
Amsterdam University (also a great city in which to study)
Boston College Law School (downmarket compared to Harvard ; but Boston Coll has some talented professors on its staff)
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (medieval town in Belgium)
University of Copenhagen (good reputation)
Indiana University (well within the top 50 U.S. Law Schools)
Penn State University (great Faculty, good value in terms of fees charged)
Lund University (in Sweden, if you like cross-country skiing in winter, this could be the place for you)
University of San Diego (great beaches nearby)
University of Tokyo (after Fukushima has calmed down)
quote
It would also be a mistake to forget the Australian universities. The University of Melbourne, the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales amongst many others. Sydney is a seriously alluring city. Worth thinking about as an LL.M. choice if you want to combine a university with a good reputation with the "joue de vivre" of studying in one of the southern hemisphere's finest cities.
It would also be a mistake to forget the Australian universities. The University of Melbourne, the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales amongst many others. Sydney is a seriously alluring city. Worth thinking about as an LL.M. choice if you want to combine a university with a good reputation with the "joue de vivre" of studying in one of the southern hemisphere's finest cities.
quote
Two other Law Schools are worth mentioning: University of Michigan in Chicago and Washington University School of Law in St. Louis. Of the two, I'd opt for Michigan over Washington. One of the reasons being that Chicago is a much more happening city than St. Louis (which struck me as somewhat provincial the time I visited there).

From an EU perspective, the European University Institute in Florence is a gem. But the problem here is that it does not offer an LL.M. degree. Most of the law students at the EUI are pursuing doctoral research. However, Florence is an idyllic place in which to spend a few years of your life.
Two other Law Schools are worth mentioning: University of Michigan in Chicago and Washington University School of Law in St. Louis. Of the two, I'd opt for Michigan over Washington. One of the reasons being that Chicago is a much more happening city than St. Louis (which struck me as somewhat provincial the time I visited there).

From an EU perspective, the European University Institute in Florence is a gem. But the problem here is that it does not offer an LL.M. degree. Most of the law students at the EUI are pursuing doctoral research. However, Florence is an idyllic place in which to spend a few years of your life.
quote
Sorry, I was under the mistaken impression that the European University Institute did not offer an LL.M. degree. However, on checking the link to Florence created by the moderators on this site, I have discovered that the EUI offers an LL.M. degree in Comparative, European and International Law. All I can say is that both Florence and the EUI would be idyllic places in which to spend a year of your life studying for a Masters degree. I would also imagine that the international nature of such a degree - received from an institution as highly thought of as the EUI - would be a huge asset to those ultimately seeking to work in the larger international law firms.
Sorry, I was under the mistaken impression that the European University Institute did not offer an LL.M. degree. However, on checking the link to Florence created by the moderators on this site, I have discovered that the EUI offers an LL.M. degree in Comparative, European and International Law. All I can say is that both Florence and the EUI would be idyllic places in which to spend a year of your life studying for a Masters degree. I would also imagine that the international nature of such a degree - received from an institution as highly thought of as the EUI - would be a huge asset to those ultimately seeking to work in the larger international law firms.
quote
Sorry, I was under the mistaken impression that the European University Institute did not offer an LL.M. degree. However, on checking the link to Florence created by the moderators on this site, I have discovered that the EUI offers an LL.M. degree in Comparative, European and International Law. All I can say is that both Florence and the EUI would be idyllic places in which to spend a year of your life studying for a Masters degree. I would also imagine that the international nature of such a degree - received from an institution as highly thought of as the EUI - would be a huge asset to those ultimately seeking to work in the larger international law firms.


Sorry , I have to correct the information that University of Michigan is not located in Chicago. It is located in Ann Arber, Michigan.
Second, Chicago or Illinois has at least three - four fantastic law school. They are Chicago, NW, UIUC, and so on..........
<blockquote>Sorry, I was under the mistaken impression that the European University Institute did not offer an LL.M. degree. However, on checking the link to Florence created by the moderators on this site, I have discovered that the EUI offers an LL.M. degree in Comparative, European and International Law. All I can say is that both Florence and the EUI would be idyllic places in which to spend a year of your life studying for a Masters degree. I would also imagine that the international nature of such a degree - received from an institution as highly thought of as the EUI - would be a huge asset to those ultimately seeking to work in the larger international law firms.</blockquote>

Sorry , I have to correct the information that University of Michigan is not located in Chicago. It is located in Ann Arber, Michigan.
Second, Chicago or Illinois has at least three - four fantastic law school. They are Chicago, NW, UIUC, and so on..........
quote
If you are going to correct someone, at least make sure you get the spelling of your corrections correctly, It's Ann Arbor, not Ann Arber, Michigan.
If you are going to correct someone, at least make sure you get the spelling of your corrections correctly, It's Ann Arbor, not Ann Arber, Michigan.
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

Oxford, United Kingdom 631 Followers 755 Discussions
Oxford, United Kingdom 27 Followers 37 Discussions
Dublin, Ireland 85 Followers 73 Discussions
Beijing, China 11 Followers 16 Discussions
Charlottesville, Virginia 175 Followers 193 Discussions
Bologna, Italy 9 Followers 7 Discussions
Stanford, California 595 Followers 366 Discussions
New Haven, Connecticut 262 Followers 351 Discussions
Cambridge, United Kingdom 578 Followers 673 Discussions
Berlin, Germany 41 Followers 22 Discussions
Amsterdam, Netherlands 250 Followers 139 Discussions
Newton, Massachusetts 60 Followers 33 Discussions
Leuven, Belgium 57 Followers 65 Discussions
Copenhagen, Denmark 70 Followers 18 Discussions
Bloomington, Indiana 26 Followers 36 Discussions
Indianapolis, Indiana 24 Followers 24 Discussions
University Park, Pennsylvania 39 Followers 30 Discussions
Lund, Sweden 101 Followers 77 Discussions
San Diego, California 82 Followers 89 Discussions
Tokyo, Japan 7 Followers 5 Discussions
Melbourne, Australia 142 Followers 94 Discussions
Sydney, Australia 142 Followers 104 Discussions
Sydney, Australia 100 Followers 58 Discussions
Ann Arbor, Michigan 218 Followers 190 Discussions
St. Louis, Missouri 32 Followers 82 Discussions
San Domenico di Fiesole, Italy 46 Followers 21 Discussions
Berkeley, California 966 Followers 515 Discussions
Cambridge, Massachusetts 901 Followers 832 Discussions
Chicago, Illinois 447 Followers 301 Discussions