LLM International Criminal Law Amsterdam or Groningen?


Hey! I am stuck between an LLM in International Criminal Law in Amsterdam (University of Amsterdam) and an LLM in Global Criminal Law at Groningen (University of Groningen). I've already applied for the first one because the deadline was April 1, but I am still wondering if I should apply for the Groningen program as well (the deadline is June 1). What would you guys advise me to do? And to the students who were/are currently enrolled, how do you rate your program? How high was your grade average when you were applying?

[Edited by Natalia Ratajczak on Apr 06, 2020]

Hey! I am stuck between an LLM in International Criminal Law in Amsterdam (University of Amsterdam) and an LLM in Global Criminal Law at Groningen (University of Groningen). I've already applied for the first one because the deadline was April 1, but I am still wondering if I should apply for the Groningen program as well (the deadline is June 1). What would you guys advise me to do? And to the students who were/are currently enrolled, how do you rate your program? How high was your grade average when you were applying?
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Tom.my

Hello there! When it comes to International Law, I believe, both of the mentioned universities hold a very good reputation and they offer a pretty good education. Therefore it much depends on the curriculum/your personal preferences/costs and etc.

I would suggest to apply to Groningen as well, wait for their offer and then decide..

Anyways, wish you all the best luck!

Hello there! When it comes to International Law, I believe, both of the mentioned universities hold a very good reputation and they offer a pretty good education. Therefore it much depends on the curriculum/your personal preferences/costs and etc.

I would suggest to apply to Groningen as well, wait for their offer and then decide..

Anyways, wish you all the best luck!
quote
Kosovare

Hey! I did my master in Global Criminal Law last year in Groningen, I am currently finishing my second master in International Human Rights Law at the same university. I did my bachelor elsewhere in the Netherlands, and to be fair, I liked Groningen a whole lot more as a whole quality wise. I felt more taken seriously by the professors, the quality of their lectures was really good and up to date: I left every lecture feeling like I learned something new. I cannot predict who you will be in a class with, but I was lucky enough to be in a class with likeminded people - all committed towards 'fighting the good fight', an environment where sexism, racism and homophobia was constantly challenged and those with privilege were checked.

I am not sure whether you studied in the Netherlands previously, but a good thing to know is that in general, self-study is something that is expected, meaning the lectures are only there to clarify and discuss: it is expected you do the reading of the relevant chapters, cases and other material at home so discussions in class can be fruitful and you can engage properly. Since I grew up in the Netherlands, this was not an issue for me, but I know some classmates struggled with this for a little bit in the beginning.

As for my average: I did a bachelor in Dutch law and was required to do a pre-LLM at Groningen before I could do the LLM, so I didn't need to have a certain average to enter the program. If I remember correctly, a 7 is required as a minimum but I do recommend you check this with the university as this is something that might have changed over time.

Hey! I did my master in Global Criminal Law last year in Groningen, I am currently finishing my second master in International Human Rights Law at the same university. I did my bachelor elsewhere in the Netherlands, and to be fair, I liked Groningen a whole lot more as a whole quality wise. I felt more taken seriously by the professors, the quality of their lectures was really good and up to date: I left every lecture feeling like I learned something new. I cannot predict who you will be in a class with, but I was lucky enough to be in a class with likeminded people - all committed towards 'fighting the good fight', an environment where sexism, racism and homophobia was constantly challenged and those with privilege were checked.

I am not sure whether you studied in the Netherlands previously, but a good thing to know is that in general, self-study is something that is expected, meaning the lectures are only there to clarify and discuss: it is expected you do the reading of the relevant chapters, cases and other material at home so discussions in class can be fruitful and you can engage properly. Since I grew up in the Netherlands, this was not an issue for me, but I know some classmates struggled with this for a little bit in the beginning.

As for my average: I did a bachelor in Dutch law and was required to do a pre-LLM at Groningen before I could do the LLM, so I didn't need to have a certain average to enter the program. If I remember correctly, a 7 is required as a minimum but I do recommend you check this with the university as this is something that might have changed over time.
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