LLM in European Law, but which one and where?


Selda1
Hey,

I am currently a third year law student, or more correctly, a very very confused third year law student.

I am an EU citizen who came to the UK to study law, and now want to continue to do a masters in European Law. I have been recommended to do it outside the UK by my tutor, in order to have a more international profile.

My problem is that I do not know which course to choose and which university. All I know is that I want to study European Law, and preferably something to do with business or economics. Do you have any suggestions of which university/universities I should apply to?

After my graduation I can consider to work for international organisations, the EU institutions or international law firms in my home country.

ANY help would be very much appreciated!! Thank you beforehand!!
Hey,

I am currently a third year law student, or more correctly, a very very confused third year law student.

I am an EU citizen who came to the UK to study law, and now want to continue to do a masters in European Law. I have been recommended to do it outside the UK by my tutor, in order to have a more international profile.

My problem is that I do not know which course to choose and which university. All I know is that I want to study European Law, and preferably something to do with business or economics. Do you have any suggestions of which university/universities I should apply to?

After my graduation I can consider to work for international organisations, the EU institutions or international law firms in my home country.

ANY help would be very much appreciated!! Thank you beforehand!!
quote
I'd recommend either the College of Europe, Bruges, or the European University Institute, Florence. The first one offers a taught programme, the second one a more research-based LLM programme. Both are particularly well-respected among EU lawyers. Bruges is very nice as a city, Florence (or, more precisely, Fiesole) is just awesome. Hope this helps as a starting point.
I'd recommend either the College of Europe, Bruges, or the European University Institute, Florence. The first one offers a taught programme, the second one a more research-based LLM programme. Both are particularly well-respected among EU lawyers. Bruges is very nice as a city, Florence (or, more precisely, Fiesole) is just awesome. Hope this helps as a starting point.
quote
york
Good recommendations.
Good recommendations.
quote
Selda
I'd recommend either the College of Europe, Bruges, or the European University Institute, Florence. The first one offers a taught programme, the second one a more research-based LLM programme. Both are particularly well-respected among EU lawyers. Bruges is very nice as a city, Florence (or, more precisely, Fiesole) is just awesome. Hope this helps as a starting point.


Hey, thank you very much for your recommendations, the problem is that I do not know any French which is required in the College of Europe.
Do you have any other suggestions? My tutor recommended university of Amsterdam, since they only teach in English but I am unsure about that because I do not know much about the university. I have had a look at the LLM courses they have and their university ranking but that is about it.
<blockquote>I'd recommend either the College of Europe, Bruges, or the European University Institute, Florence. The first one offers a taught programme, the second one a more research-based LLM programme. Both are particularly well-respected among EU lawyers. Bruges is very nice as a city, Florence (or, more precisely, Fiesole) is just awesome. Hope this helps as a starting point.</blockquote>

Hey, thank you very much for your recommendations, the problem is that I do not know any French which is required in the College of Europe.
Do you have any other suggestions? My tutor recommended university of Amsterdam, since they only teach in English but I am unsure about that because I do not know much about the university. I have had a look at the LLM courses they have and their university ranking but that is about it.

quote
Unfortunately, I don't know anything about the Amsterdam LLM programme.

But you might want to have a look at the "Law in a European and Global Context" LLM programme at the Católica Global School of Law in Lisbon. The programme is relatively new and might not be that well-known, but both the faculty and the programme (taught entirely in English) as such are great. The programme directors are Joseph Weiler and Miguel Maduro, two really big names when it comes to EU law (and deservedly so).

One further suggestion: The LLM Program in European and International Business Law at the University of Vienna (also taught entirely in English, if I am not mistaken). This programme should generally also be of a high quality. As it comprises many elective subjects the experience as a whole might depend on which subjects -- and therefore lecturers -- you choose. Not least: Vienna is lovely.
Unfortunately, I don't know anything about the Amsterdam LLM programme.

But you might want to have a look at the "Law in a European and Global Context" LLM programme at the Católica Global School of Law in Lisbon. The programme is relatively new and might not be that well-known, but both the faculty and the programme (taught entirely in English) as such are great. The programme directors are Joseph Weiler and Miguel Maduro, two really big names when it comes to EU law (and deservedly so).

One further suggestion: The LLM Program in European and International Business Law at the University of Vienna (also taught entirely in English, if I am not mistaken). This programme should generally also be of a high quality. As it comprises many elective subjects the experience as a whole might depend on which subjects -- and therefore lecturers -- you choose. Not least: Vienna is lovely.
quote
Selda
Thank you very much for your recommendations! I will have a look at the universities you've mentioned.

Would you say it is better to go to a prestigious university when it comes to EU law or a well-known university in general such as one of the top ranked universities, if you are unsure whether you want to work within the EU, an international organisation, international law firm etc.

Thank you once again!
Thank you very much for your recommendations! I will have a look at the universities you've mentioned.

Would you say it is better to go to a prestigious university when it comes to EU law or a well-known university in general such as one of the top ranked universities, if you are unsure whether you want to work within the EU, an international organisation, international law firm etc.

Thank you once again!
quote
Nic25
Just try also the websites of the LL.M. of the University of Zürich or St. Gallen. Both offer very good programs - in English!
Just try also the websites of the LL.M. of the University of Zürich or St. Gallen. Both offer very good programs - in English!
quote
daneko
Just try also the websites of the LL.M. of the University of Zürich or St. Gallen. Both offer very good programs - in English!


I checked Univ of Zurich and I was not convinced that they are very strong in International Business Law and some courses are in German which may or may not be an issue.

St. Gallen is an executive program but there is very little focus on Asia (just one week).
<blockquote>Just try also the websites of the LL.M. of the University of Zürich or St. Gallen. Both offer very good programs - in English!</blockquote>

I checked Univ of Zurich and I was not convinced that they are very strong in International Business Law and some courses are in German which may or may not be an issue.

St. Gallen is an executive program but there is very little focus on Asia (just one week).
quote
LBX
I'd like to add that "Law in a European and Global Context" LLM programme at the Católica Global School of Law in Lisbon (featuring an amazing selection of faculty) allows you to choose also courses from the "International Business Law" Advanced LL.M. And Lisbon is a lively and friendly city with a lot of sun.
I'd like to add that "Law in a European and Global Context" LLM programme at the Católica Global School of Law in Lisbon (featuring an amazing selection of faculty) allows you to choose also courses from the "International Business Law" Advanced LL.M. And Lisbon is a lively and friendly city with a lot of sun.
quote
Rous
Hello everyone!!

Does anyone have any thoughts on Leiden, Luxembourg and Edinburgh? I've heard Leiden University is really good for international and EU law. Has anyone been in any of these? How is the student experience there?

Thank you in advance!!
Hello everyone!!

Does anyone have any thoughts on Leiden, Luxembourg and Edinburgh? I've heard Leiden University is really good for international and EU law. Has anyone been in any of these? How is the student experience there?

Thank you in advance!!
quote
Rous
Hello everybody!!

I am in the same situation! Very, very confused about where to go to do my LLM in European Union law... College of Europe and EUI are absolutely classic, but very difficult to get into! Here's a list of Universities I am considering for my applications:

1. Leiden University
2. King's College London.
3. University of Cambridge
4. University of Edinburgh
5. University of Luxembourg
6. University of Durham
7. University of Ghent

Any thoughts? I would really appreciate it if anyone who has been on European related programmes in these Universities could tell me a bit about their experience :)

Also, I am not certain what student profiles these Universities are looking for. I have a 2.1 degree. If you could tell me more or less what kind of people got into your programmes, I'd be very grateful!

Good luck to all of you!!
Hello everybody!!

I am in the same situation! Very, very confused about where to go to do my LLM in European Union law... College of Europe and EUI are absolutely classic, but very difficult to get into! Here's a list of Universities I am considering for my applications:

1. Leiden University
2. King's College London.
3. University of Cambridge
4. University of Edinburgh
5. University of Luxembourg
6. University of Durham
7. University of Ghent

Any thoughts? I would really appreciate it if anyone who has been on European related programmes in these Universities could tell me a bit about their experience :)

Also, I am not certain what student profiles these Universities are looking for. I have a 2.1 degree. If you could tell me more or less what kind of people got into your programmes, I'd be very grateful!

Good luck to all of you!!
quote
Selda
Thank you very much for all the replies!!

Does anyone know anything about the European Business Law offered in Lund's University?

I was recommended to apply to Amsterdam university, but have no knowledge of the university. Does anyone know if it is a good university to do an LLM in European Law?
Thank you very much for all the replies!!

Does anyone know anything about the European Business Law offered in Lund's University?

I was recommended to apply to Amsterdam university, but have no knowledge of the university. Does anyone know if it is a good university to do an LLM in European Law?

quote
Selda1
Does anyone know anything about the European Business Law offered in Lund's University?

I was recommended to apply to Amsterdam university, but have no knowledge of the university. Does anyone know if it is a good university to do an LLM in European Law?
Does anyone know anything about the European Business Law offered in Lund's University?

I was recommended to apply to Amsterdam university, but have no knowledge of the university. Does anyone know if it is a good university to do an LLM in European Law?
quote
Hey Selda1,

Having attended Catolica Global School of Law's "Law in an European and Global Context" I would definitely recommended it.

If you are looking for an LL.M. in European Law I would argue that there is not better LL.M. due to the quality of its Faculty which is comprised of great scholars like Professors Joseph Weiler, Miguel Poiares Maduro, Armin von Bogdandy, Damian Chalmers, James Boyle, Daniel Halberstam, David Gerber, Eric A. Posner, Mattias Kumm, Neil Walker, Piet Eeckhout, Petros Mavroidis, Stephen Weatherill .... and the list goes on.

Every year the law school invites distinguished lecturers to speak (some past names, Bruce Ackerman, Sabino Cassesse - who now also teaches there)

It's not only th quality of the faculty, it is also the unique interdisciplinary teaching method, studying law in context.

Moreover, you can, as I did and many other students do, takes courses from Catolica's other LL.M. - International Business Law.

Catolica has recently been recognized by the FT in an articled focusing on Legal studies in a globalised era. It is also featured for the third consecutive year in the FT's innovative LL.M. report

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/655c092a-29b7-11e2-a604-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2CdAKnYLq

Lastly, the academic atmosphere is great, also because Lisbon is an incredible place to study and to foster great ties.

Hope this helps,
Hey Selda1,

Having attended Catolica Global School of Law's "Law in an European and Global Context" I would definitely recommended it.

If you are looking for an LL.M. in European Law I would argue that there is not better LL.M. due to the quality of its Faculty which is comprised of great scholars like Professors Joseph Weiler, Miguel Poiares Maduro, Armin von Bogdandy, Damian Chalmers, James Boyle, Daniel Halberstam, David Gerber, Eric A. Posner, Mattias Kumm, Neil Walker, Piet Eeckhout, Petros Mavroidis, Stephen Weatherill .... and the list goes on.

Every year the law school invites distinguished lecturers to speak (some past names, Bruce Ackerman, Sabino Cassesse - who now also teaches there)

It's not only th quality of the faculty, it is also the unique interdisciplinary teaching method, studying law in context.

Moreover, you can, as I did and many other students do, takes courses from Catolica's other LL.M. - International Business Law.

Catolica has recently been recognized by the FT in an articled focusing on Legal studies in a globalised era. It is also featured for the third consecutive year in the FT's innovative LL.M. report

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/655c092a-29b7-11e2-a604-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2CdAKnYLq

Lastly, the academic atmosphere is great, also because Lisbon is an incredible place to study and to foster great ties.

Hope this helps,
quote
Selda1
Hey,

Thank you very much for your reply! Can I ask where you are working at the moment, if you do not mind me asking. The reason why I am asking is because I am not sure if I want to practice law or not. But throughout my years in law school so far I have not wanted to practice law and instead work for the EU or international organisations, however I am reconsidering now since I want to work in Sweden/Denmark during the first few years after my LLM. So I am wondering if it would be a good idea to apply to this university if I want to work in Scandinavia for a few years? Or should I go to a university which is more recognised in those areas (I am considering that Catloica Global School is for now most known in the Union, but I might be wrong)?
Hey,

Thank you very much for your reply! Can I ask where you are working at the moment, if you do not mind me asking. The reason why I am asking is because I am not sure if I want to practice law or not. But throughout my years in law school so far I have not wanted to practice law and instead work for the EU or international organisations, however I am reconsidering now since I want to work in Sweden/Denmark during the first few years after my LLM. So I am wondering if it would be a good idea to apply to this university if I want to work in Scandinavia for a few years? Or should I go to a university which is more recognised in those areas (I am considering that Catloica Global School is for now most known in the Union, but I might be wrong)?
quote
Eagle 1
I attended the inaugural LL.M. in European law at Catolica. Thereafter I worked as an intern in one of the EU institutions in Brussels and now I am working as a business lawyer in Stockholm; so I presume I am the right person to answer your question :-)

I know it is a tough decision to pick an LL.M. According to my experience, both employers and colleagues have been very interested to hear about my education since I am probably the first they have heard of studying law in Portugal and, perhaps even more, how it was to live one year in sunny Lisbon, a for many people a truly unique experience. None of my jobs have been typical "legal jobs". In the EU I worked with international relations and my current job is related to competition law (very challenging if you like business and economic reasoning). However, since an LL.M. for most students is a big investment in both time and money I think you should think twice about it since you seem unsure if law is really your thing. Perhaps an MBA would be a better option? Catolica also runs a one-year MBA program in conjunction with Nova.

As for working in Sweden, it is no secret that the job market is affected by the current financial situation in Europe (in Denmark it is even worse). But in general I believe the job market is stronger than average but you really need to know the local language to be considered for a decent position.

Good luck!
I attended the inaugural LL.M. in European law at Catolica. Thereafter I worked as an intern in one of the EU institutions in Brussels and now I am working as a business lawyer in Stockholm; so I presume I am the right person to answer your question :-)

I know it is a tough decision to pick an LL.M. According to my experience, both employers and colleagues have been very interested to hear about my education since I am probably the first they have heard of studying law in Portugal and, perhaps even more, how it was to live one year in sunny Lisbon, a for many people a truly unique experience. None of my jobs have been typical "legal jobs". In the EU I worked with international relations and my current job is related to competition law (very challenging if you like business and economic reasoning). However, since an LL.M. for most students is a big investment in both time and money I think you should think twice about it since you seem unsure if law is really your thing. Perhaps an MBA would be a better option? Catolica also runs a one-year MBA program in conjunction with Nova.

As for working in Sweden, it is no secret that the job market is affected by the current financial situation in Europe (in Denmark it is even worse). But in general I believe the job market is stronger than average but you really need to know the local language to be considered for a decent position.

Good luck!

quote
Hi, I can highly recommend the LL.M. in International & European Law at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Institute for European Studies). Great academics and accessible practitioners from the Commission, the Council and Brussels law firms are doing an excellent job in guiding students through the EU's legal practice (with visits to all institutions and many personal contacts for students as a result). I am a former student at VUB and now working at the Commission (just as many of my former classmates). And I am very satisfied with my experience. Check it out!!
Hi, I can highly recommend the LL.M. in International & European Law at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Institute for European Studies). Great academics and accessible practitioners from the Commission, the Council and Brussels law firms are doing an excellent job in guiding students through the EU's legal practice (with visits to all institutions and many personal contacts for students as a result). I am a former student at VUB and now working at the Commission (just as many of my former classmates). And I am very satisfied with my experience. Check it out!!
quote
If you already speak French and want to improve it :
CANDIDATEZ pour participer à la formation LL.M. 2013-14 !

Contact : Ll.M-Droit@univ-paris1.fr / + 33 (0) 1 44 78 33 10 SORBONNE ECOLE DROIT

http://llm-droit.univ-paris1.fr/

LL.M. (Magister Legum) en droit français et droit européen
Ranked N°1 in France
(guide LL.M. Law school Rankings 2013)

The LL.M program of the Paris 1/ Sorbonne Law School, designed for law students and practicing lawyers from non-French jurisdictions, provides a solid foundation in French and European Law through courses and conferences taught in French, in the center of Paris, from September to June. It
includes, among academic courses, three months of mandatory practical training. The deadline to apply for the upcoming academic year is May 30th. More information, including application forms and brochure, is available on our website at this address: http://llm-droit.univ-paris1.fr/

TEMOIGNAGES ETUDIANTS / INTERVIEWS
« Le meilleur moyen pour un étudiant étranger davoir une formation complète en droit français. En plus de lindéniable enrichissement personnel quil procure, il permet dacquérir les connaissances indispensables à la pratique du droit en France et au passage de lexamen du barreau de Paris par équivalence. » Alessandra Donati (promotion 2012), avocate aux barreau de Milan et de Paris.

« La formation, sérieuse et structurée, ma donné un aperçu étendu mais substantiel des principales matières de droit privé et de droit public. Les enseignements, de grande
qualité, tous dispensés en langue française à un petit groupe détudiants internationaux représentant 12 nationalités, mont permis dintégrer en tant que collaborateur une
structure de prestige, de résider et de travailler à Paris. »
Mohamed Mahayni (promotion LL.M. 2012), avocat au Barreau dAngleterre et du Pays de Galle, de nationalités syrienne et canadienne.

« Les nombreux cours, visites des principales institutions de lUnion Européenne ainsi que des juridictions françaises permettent, en temps record, aux élèves internationaux
de lEcole de droit de devenir familier avec le système franco-européen interconnectés. Le stage obligatoire à la fin de la formation théorique du LL.M. permet une intégration totale au sein des employeurs français du milieu du droit. » Cherine Foty (promotion 2011) avocate au barreau de New York dorigine égyptienne, doctorante à lUniversité de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne.

« La diversité des matières enseignées et la passion des professeurs pour leurs domaines dexpertise respectifs font de ce LLM un programme tout à fait exceptionnel. Les aspects pratiques du cursus permettent aux étudiants de mettre en uvre les réflexes et connaissances juridiques de la formation théorique. Je le recommande fortement à tout juriste étranger ayant lambition de travailler en France. »
Diana Bowman (promotion 2011), avocate au barreau de Victoria (Australie) et collaboratrice au bureau parisien dun grand cabinet davocats.

« Une année inoubliable pour les liens tissés avec des gens du monde entier, pour le soutien constant de laimable corps enseignant et lopportunité deffectuer des stages au Conseil dEtat et au Quai dOrsay. Mes attentes à légard du programme ont été amplement dépassées. »
John Christie (promotion 2012), juriste de nationalités chypriote et néo-zélandaise.
If you already speak French and want to improve it :
CANDIDATEZ pour participer à la formation LL.M. 2013-14 !

Contact : Ll.M-Droit@univ-paris1.fr / + 33 (0) 1 44 78 33 10 SORBONNE ECOLE DROIT

http://llm-droit.univ-paris1.fr/

LL.M. (Magister Legum) en droit français et droit européen
Ranked N°1 in France
(guide LL.M. Law school Rankings 2013)

The LL.M program of the Paris 1/ Sorbonne Law School, designed for law students and practicing lawyers from non-French jurisdictions, provides a solid foundation in French and European Law through courses and conferences taught in French, in the center of Paris, from September to June. It
includes, among academic courses, three months of mandatory practical training. The deadline to apply for the upcoming academic year is May 30th. More information, including application forms and brochure, is available on our website at this address: http://llm-droit.univ-paris1.fr/

TEMOIGNAGES ETUDIANTS / INTERVIEWS
« Le meilleur moyen pour un étudiant étranger d’avoir une formation complète en droit français. En plus de l’indéniable enrichissement personnel qu’il procure, il permet d’acquérir les connaissances indispensables à la pratique du droit en France et au passage de l’examen du barreau de Paris par équivalence. » Alessandra Donati (promotion 2012), avocate aux barreau de Milan et de Paris.

« La formation, sérieuse et structurée, m’a donné un aperçu étendu mais substantiel des principales matières de droit privé et de droit public. Les enseignements, de grande
qualité, tous dispensés en langue française à un petit groupe d’étudiants internationaux représentant 12 nationalités, m’ont permis d’intégrer en tant que collaborateur une
structure de prestige, de résider et de travailler à Paris. »
Mohamed Mahayni (promotion LL.M. 2012), avocat au Barreau d’Angleterre et du Pays de Galle, de nationalités syrienne et canadienne.

« Les nombreux cours, visites des principales institutions de l’Union Européenne ainsi que des juridictions françaises permettent, en temps record, aux élèves internationaux
de l’Ecole de droit de devenir familier avec le système franco-européen interconnectés. Le stage obligatoire à la fin de la formation théorique du LL.M. permet une intégration totale au sein des employeurs français du milieu du droit. » Cherine Foty (promotion 2011) avocate au barreau de New York d’origine égyptienne, doctorante à l’Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne.

« La diversité des matières enseignées et la passion des professeurs pour leurs domaines d’expertise respectifs font de ce LLM un programme tout à fait exceptionnel. Les aspects pratiques du cursus permettent aux étudiants de mettre en œuvre les réflexes et connaissances juridiques de la formation théorique. Je le recommande fortement à tout juriste étranger ayant l’ambition de travailler en France. »
Diana Bowman (promotion 2011), avocate au barreau de Victoria (Australie) et collaboratrice au bureau parisien d’un grand cabinet d’avocats.

« Une année inoubliable pour les liens tissés avec des gens du monde entier, pour le soutien constant de l’aimable corps enseignant et l’opportunité d’effectuer des stages au Conseil d’Etat et au Quai d’Orsay. Mes attentes à l’égard du programme ont été amplement dépassées. »
John Christie (promotion 2012), juriste de nationalités chypriote et néo-zélandaise.
quote
Selda1
I attended the inaugural LL.M. in European law at Catolica. Thereafter I worked as an intern in one of the EU institutions in Brussels and now I am working as a business lawyer in Stockholm; so I presume I am the right person to answer your question :-)

I know it is a tough decision to pick an LL.M. According to my experience, both employers and colleagues have been very interested to hear about my education since I am probably the first they have heard of studying law in Portugal and, perhaps even more, how it was to live one year in sunny Lisbon, a for many people a truly unique experience. None of my jobs have been typical "legal jobs". In the EU I worked with international relations and my current job is related to competition law (very challenging if you like business and economic reasoning). However, since an LL.M. for most students is a big investment in both time and money I think you should think twice about it since you seem unsure if law is really your thing. Perhaps an MBA would be a better option? Catolica also runs a one-year MBA program in conjunction with Nova.

As for working in Sweden, it is no secret that the job market is affected by the current financial situation in Europe (in Denmark it is even worse). But in general I believe the job market is stronger than average but you really need to know the local language to be considered for a decent position.

Good luck!



Thank you very much for your reply! Fortunately I do know the loca language! I am unsure about law because I firstly want to work for international organisations or EU, however, I would love to work as a business lawyer for example, but I thought that this would be very tough for me in Scandinavia considering that it would mostly be possible for people with a Swedish LLB, is this case? Did you do your LLB in Sweden?

If I get a job as a practising lawyer I need to have done 4 years of law in order for it to be converted into an equivalent law degree, that is why I have not looked into MBA programs. But thank you very much for your tip!

Once again thank you very much for your reply, and yes you were the right person to answer the question!
<blockquote>I attended the inaugural LL.M. in European law at Catolica. Thereafter I worked as an intern in one of the EU institutions in Brussels and now I am working as a business lawyer in Stockholm; so I presume I am the right person to answer your question :-)

I know it is a tough decision to pick an LL.M. According to my experience, both employers and colleagues have been very interested to hear about my education since I am probably the first they have heard of studying law in Portugal and, perhaps even more, how it was to live one year in sunny Lisbon, a for many people a truly unique experience. None of my jobs have been typical "legal jobs". In the EU I worked with international relations and my current job is related to competition law (very challenging if you like business and economic reasoning). However, since an LL.M. for most students is a big investment in both time and money I think you should think twice about it since you seem unsure if law is really your thing. Perhaps an MBA would be a better option? Catolica also runs a one-year MBA program in conjunction with Nova.

As for working in Sweden, it is no secret that the job market is affected by the current financial situation in Europe (in Denmark it is even worse). But in general I believe the job market is stronger than average but you really need to know the local language to be considered for a decent position.

Good luck!

</blockquote>

Thank you very much for your reply! Fortunately I do know the loca language! I am unsure about law because I firstly want to work for international organisations or EU, however, I would love to work as a business lawyer for example, but I thought that this would be very tough for me in Scandinavia considering that it would mostly be possible for people with a Swedish LLB, is this case? Did you do your LLB in Sweden?

If I get a job as a practising lawyer I need to have done 4 years of law in order for it to be converted into an equivalent law degree, that is why I have not looked into MBA programs. But thank you very much for your tip!

Once again thank you very much for your reply, and yes you were the right person to answer the question!

quote
Brainy Smu...
Anything near Brussels-Luxembourg would be considerably ideal for EU law. Checkout: Ghent, Leiden, Leuven, Luxembourg, Maastricht, Tilburg, Utrecht and Vienna. Also being that you are near completion of your law course within the borders of the UK. Have you considered Edinburgh?
Anything near Brussels-Luxembourg would be considerably ideal for EU law. Checkout: Ghent, Leiden, Leuven, Luxembourg, Maastricht, Tilburg, Utrecht and Vienna. Also being that you are near completion of your law course within the borders of the UK. Have you considered Edinburgh?


quote

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