Securities Law LLM


Has anyone here been admitted to Georgetown or NYU for securities law? If so, what kind of grades does it take (is top 10% enough at a T2 law school?) Did you go straight from JD to LLM?

Any thoughts would be much appreciated.

Has anyone here been admitted to Georgetown or NYU for securities law? If so, what kind of grades does it take (is top 10% enough at a T2 law school?) Did you go straight from JD to LLM?

Any thoughts would be much appreciated.
quote
elainamico

i have heard the program at Georgetown is supposed to be good, as the securities prof there is awesome. if u find out about anything else then let me know, i would also like to do a securities law LLM.

i have heard the program at Georgetown is supposed to be good, as the securities prof there is awesome. if u find out about anything else then let me know, i would also like to do a securities law LLM.
quote
Pitch

The Best Professors for Securities and CApital Markets are at Columbia (Coffee, Fox, etc...) you should definitely try to go there if it's your area of interest...althought these are trouble times for being a Capital Markets Lawyer...

The Best Professors for Securities and CApital Markets are at Columbia (Coffee, Fox, etc...) you should definitely try to go there if it's your area of interest...althought these are trouble times for being a Capital Markets Lawyer...
quote
elainamico

thanks
and btw Georgetown has really good professors for WTO and anti-trust related laws.

oh and, as silly as this sounds, can u pls tell me how to start a post on this discussion board? i am sorry but i just cant seem to figure it out.

thanks
and btw Georgetown has really good professors for WTO and anti-trust related laws.

oh and, as silly as this sounds, can u pls tell me how to start a post on this discussion board? i am sorry but i just cant seem to figure it out.
quote
drums2345

As a current student at the Georgetown University Law Center seeking an LLM in Securities and Financial Regulation, I highly recommend this program to anyone interested in pursuing a career in either securities or financial regulation. Quite frankly, I believe those professionals without an LLM in this area of specialty will be at a disadvantage due to the complexity and comprehensiveness of these fields of law.

In the current market, lawyers need every advantage they can find and they need to avoid any gaps on their resume. Hence, this LLM may be very helpful. Further, law firms now do not want to pay for the training of their associates and would rather have an associate that can hit the ground running.

In addition to the highly competent and qualified teaching (the best in their fields) and connections with all of the various regulators in DC creating an ideal and cutting edge learning environment, the connections and ability to gain experience at the regulators through the program (e.g., SEC, Treasury, OCC, FDIC, FERC, CFTC, etc.) are excellent. For the reasons stated above, and many others not stated, Georgetown University Law Center's LLM Program in Securities and Financial Regulation is probably the best program of its kind within the United States.
Although there are schools like Harvard, Columbia, etc. these schools, in this area of the law, are not in DC. Why is this important? Washington D.C. is the center of all financial regulation within the US and the center of all legal reforms in the areas of securities and banking law. When your professors walk (or take the Metro) directly from their highest ranking positions in Big Law or at the SEC, OCC, FDIC, CFTC, FERC, Treasury, FINRA etc. (most of whom have also previously worked in Big Law) you become the possible recipient of the best connections possible and are learning the most current and relevant information possible. Although much of the world still says "Wow!" when you say you went to Harvard, at the end of the day it comes down to what you know, who you know, and how well you can utilize these two things in your career.

The current legal market in the United States is probably and hopefully the worst those reading this will ever experience. Also, we should be out of this mess within a few years. Hereafter, things will get better for us all. Now is a good time to be obtaining an LLM in an area of the law that interests you and that will serve to connect you to many future employers. My recommendation is if you have a job then keep it and do the LLM part-time. If you dont have a job and cant find one, then seriously consider getting your LLM (full-time or part-time) from the best school possible in that particular area of the law because in the future this may be a new unspoken requirement in many fields of law such as securities and banking law. Please do not forget some important facts: 1) the law and the legal profession are both becoming more specialized and more complex; and 2) most employers today would rather hire someone that already has a strong foundation in their chosen field than to have to pay for and take valuable time to train that lawyer. Also, the proliferation of LLM programs is changing the landscape of the legal profession and upping the ante as they say in poker.

As a current student at the Georgetown University Law Center seeking an LLM in Securities and Financial Regulation, I highly recommend this program to anyone interested in pursuing a career in either securities or financial regulation. Quite frankly, I believe those professionals without an LLM in this area of specialty will be at a disadvantage due to the complexity and comprehensiveness of these fields of law.

In the current market, lawyers need every advantage they can find and they need to avoid any gaps on their resume. Hence, this LLM may be very helpful. Further, law firms now do not want to pay for the training of their associates and would rather have an associate that can hit the ground running.

In addition to the highly competent and qualified teaching (the best in their fields) and connections with all of the various regulators in DC creating an ideal and cutting edge learning environment, the connections and ability to gain experience at the regulators through the program (e.g., SEC, Treasury, OCC, FDIC, FERC, CFTC, etc.) are excellent. For the reasons stated above, and many others not stated, Georgetown University Law Center's LLM Program in Securities and Financial Regulation is probably the best program of its kind within the United States.
Although there are schools like Harvard, Columbia, etc. these schools, in this area of the law, are not in DC. Why is this important? Washington D.C. is the center of all financial regulation within the US and the center of all legal reforms in the areas of securities and banking law. When your professors walk (or take the Metro) directly from their highest ranking positions in Big Law or at the SEC, OCC, FDIC, CFTC, FERC, Treasury, FINRA etc. (most of whom have also previously worked in Big Law) you become the possible recipient of the best connections possible and are learning the most current and relevant information possible. Although much of the world still says "Wow!" when you say you went to Harvard, at the end of the day it comes down to what you know, who you know, and how well you can utilize these two things in your career.

The current legal market in the United States is probably and hopefully the worst those reading this will ever experience. Also, we should be out of this mess within a few years. Hereafter, things will get better for us all. Now is a good time to be obtaining an LLM in an area of the law that interests you and that will serve to connect you to many future employers. My recommendation is if you have a job then keep it and do the LLM part-time. If you don’t have a job and can’t find one, then seriously consider getting your LLM (full-time or part-time) from the best school possible in that particular area of the law because in the future this may be a new unspoken requirement in many fields of law such as securities and banking law. Please do not forget some important facts: 1) the law and the legal profession are both becoming more specialized and more complex; and 2) most employers today would rather hire someone that already has a strong foundation in their chosen field than to have to pay for and take valuable time to train that lawyer. Also, the proliferation of LLM programs is changing the landscape of the legal profession and “upping the ante” as they say in poker.
quote
dennisk

I was admitted in October to the Securities LLM program. I have heard that admissions depends on the applicant pool but that things are tough and getting tougher since there are more applicants now. I have been out of law school for several years now which I hear is a plus especially if your work experience was securities related (mine was). That said I took a class over the summer just to see if I really wanted to apply for the program and there were students in the class that had gone straight from JD to LLM. There were also students from T2 schools. Georgtown does say that not many students with less than 3.2 gpa get admitted but again I'd think that would depend on the applicant pool to a great extent. Hope this helps.

I was admitted in October to the Securities LLM program. I have heard that admissions depends on the applicant pool but that things are tough and getting tougher since there are more applicants now. I have been out of law school for several years now which I hear is a plus especially if your work experience was securities related (mine was). That said I took a class over the summer just to see if I really wanted to apply for the program and there were students in the class that had gone straight from JD to LLM. There were also students from T2 schools. Georgtown does say that not many students with less than 3.2 gpa get admitted but again I'd think that would depend on the applicant pool to a great extent. Hope this helps.
quote

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