NYU Admitted - average age


ivan2006

Hmmm.... Actually, I don´t hold the PhD yet - I still have to finish my thesis -, but I thought a year at NYU could do good to my research... About the LLM I hold, I guess it´s no big deal compared to NYU... I´m not fond at all of diplomas, etc., and I decided to pursue other LLM based just on the things I´ll be able to learn at NYU (specially now that I´m more experienced).

Hmmm.... Actually, I don´t hold the PhD yet - I still have to finish my thesis -, but I thought a year at NYU could do good to my research... About the LLM I hold, I guess it´s no big deal compared to NYU... I´m not fond at all of diplomas, etc., and I decided to pursue other LLM based just on the things I´ll be able to learn at NYU (specially now that I´m more experienced).
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cmac

I think that until you have taken the New York Bar you have nothing to trade with in the marketplace. Once you're a qualified, bona fide attorney, you can sell your professional qualification with an LLM from a prestigious university to secure employment in the U.S.
Not having done a JD does not vitiate your ability to work as a lawyer in the U.S. The law firms don't just hire JDs with impugnity. They also look at foreign candidates. If you're a very smart person, with a good resume, the Bar and an LLM from NYU, etc, the law firm's elastic hiring policy will encompass you.
Don't go for the head fake and think that if you don't have a JD you should just leave the US after your LLM. This would lead to a chronic underuse of your U.S. LLM. When in the U.S. pick the low hanging fruit- go for job interviews, network, serendipitedously coincide social gatherings with getting to know working attorneys.
Then, when the gong tolls and your LLM year is up, you will, WILL, get a job in the U.S. Believe.

I think that until you have taken the New York Bar you have nothing to trade with in the marketplace. Once you're a qualified, bona fide attorney, you can sell your professional qualification with an LLM from a prestigious university to secure employment in the U.S.
Not having done a JD does not vitiate your ability to work as a lawyer in the U.S. The law firms don't just hire JDs with impugnity. They also look at foreign candidates. If you're a very smart person, with a good resume, the Bar and an LLM from NYU, etc, the law firm's elastic hiring policy will encompass you.
Don't go for the head fake and think that if you don't have a JD you should just leave the US after your LLM. This would lead to a chronic underuse of your U.S. LLM. When in the U.S. pick the low hanging fruit- go for job interviews, network, serendipitedously coincide social gatherings with getting to know working attorneys.
Then, when the gong tolls and your LLM year is up, you will, WILL, get a job in the U.S. Believe.
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Why is it important?

Why is it important?
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salsa75

Ther reasons why US law firms are not crazy about LLMs are that (i) they received their education in a different legal system, and (ii) they are not native speakers. Please don't get started with the story that US lawyers get a better and deeper education b/c this is really funny, if you consider how strict and demanding are many European Universities. Plus, in many European countries law graduates have to go through at least a couple of years of apprenticeship and pass a tough bar exam.

It's funny how in the US law school is considered a graduate program while in most of the rest of the world it is an undergraduate program. In the US, most 22 year olds will have just received their 4 year Bachelor's degree with a major other than law (e.g., Political Science, Economics etc) and will just be starting law school, which takes three years. Therefore, it takes 7 years of study to be a lawyer, and the youngest US law school graduates are usually 25 years old. At the law school I attended, the average age of a new student was 25. I think that this is probably the main reason why LL.B graduates from other countries who complete a US LL.M may have trouble getting a job with a US law firm, as these students have only 4 or 5 years of university education (3 or 4 years of undergraduate for the LL.B and one year for the LL.M), versus 7 years of university study for a US law graduate.

Ther reasons why US law firms are not crazy about LLMs are that (i) they received their education in a different legal system, and (ii) they are not native speakers. Please don't get started with the story that US lawyers get a better and deeper education b/c this is really funny, if you consider how strict and demanding are many European Universities. Plus, in many European countries law graduates have to go through at least a couple of years of apprenticeship and pass a tough bar exam.

<blockquote>It's funny how in the US law school is considered a graduate program while in most of the rest of the world it is an undergraduate program. In the US, most 22 year olds will have just received their 4 year Bachelor's degree with a major other than law (e.g., Political Science, Economics etc) and will just be starting law school, which takes three years. Therefore, it takes 7 years of study to be a lawyer, and the youngest US law school graduates are usually 25 years old. At the law school I attended, the average age of a new student was 25. I think that this is probably the main reason why LL.B graduates from other countries who complete a US LL.M may have trouble getting a job with a US law firm, as these students have only 4 or 5 years of university education (3 or 4 years of undergraduate for the LL.B and one year for the LL.M), versus 7 years of university study for a US law graduate. </blockquote>
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Igorek


Hi, Igorek! Have you been admitted to HLS already? :)


What's up, buddy? ))
Yes, Yes, and one more time Yes!!!

What about you?
Appologies for this question, but I just can't track all the posts about HLS admission on this board.

<blockquote>
Hi, Igorek! Have you been admitted to HLS already? :)</blockquote>

What's up, buddy? ))
Yes, Yes, and one more time Yes!!!

What about you?
Appologies for this question, but I just can't track all the posts about HLS admission on this board.
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Hi!
I wil get my bachelor degree in June, and at that time I will be 23.

Hi!
I wil get my bachelor degree in June, and at that time I will be 23.
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hannenyh

Ther reasons why US law firms are not crazy about LLMs are that (i) they received their education in a different legal system, and (ii) they are not native speakers. Please don't get started with the story that US lawyers get a better and deeper education b/c this is really funny, if you consider how strict and demanding are many European Universities. Plus, in many European countries law graduates have to go through at least a couple of years of apprenticeship and pass a tough bar exam.


I agree, a lot of the European Uni's are demanding. But you can't seriously say that having a 7 year law degree compared to a 4 year law degree doesn't make a difference? We have 6 years then 2 years of apprenticeship. It seems the differences between the European countries are bigger than I expected.

<blockquote>Ther reasons why US law firms are not crazy about LLMs are that (i) they received their education in a different legal system, and (ii) they are not native speakers. Please don't get started with the story that US lawyers get a better and deeper education b/c this is really funny, if you consider how strict and demanding are many European Universities. Plus, in many European countries law graduates have to go through at least a couple of years of apprenticeship and pass a tough bar exam.</blockquote>

I agree, a lot of the European Uni's are demanding. But you can't seriously say that having a 7 year law degree compared to a 4 year law degree doesn't make a difference? We have 6 years then 2 years of apprenticeship. It seems the differences between the European countries are bigger than I expected.

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