NYU Admitted - average age


richardvf

It's funny how in the US law school is considered a graduate program while in most of the rest of the world it is an undergraduate program. In the US, most 22 year olds will have just received their 4 year Bachelor's degree with a major other than law (e.g., Political Science, Economics etc) and will just be starting law school, which takes three years. Therefore, it takes 7 years of study to be a lawyer, and the youngest US law school graduates are usually 25 years old. At the law school I attended, the average age of a new student was 25. I think that this is probably the main reason why LL.B graduates from other countries who complete a US LL.M may have trouble getting a job with a US law firm, as these students have only 4 or 5 years of university education (3 or 4 years of undergraduate for the LL.B and one year for the LL.M), versus 7 years of university study for a US law graduate.

It's funny how in the US law school is considered a graduate program while in most of the rest of the world it is an undergraduate program. In the US, most 22 year olds will have just received their 4 year Bachelor's degree with a major other than law (e.g., Political Science, Economics etc) and will just be starting law school, which takes three years. Therefore, it takes 7 years of study to be a lawyer, and the youngest US law school graduates are usually 25 years old. At the law school I attended, the average age of a new student was 25. I think that this is probably the main reason why LL.B graduates from other countries who complete a US LL.M may have trouble getting a job with a US law firm, as these students have only 4 or 5 years of university education (3 or 4 years of undergraduate for the LL.B and one year for the LL.M), versus 7 years of university study for a US law graduate.
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hannenyh

I Norway we kind of do the same thing. The first semester is philosophy and intro to law. The next 4 years we have a set curriculum. Then the last 1 1/2 years we have electives and also write a 12-credit thesis. The main difference from the US is that we don't get that much perspective, as all we study is law.

I Norway we kind of do the same thing. The first semester is philosophy and intro to law. The next 4 years we have a set curriculum. Then the last 1 1/2 years we have electives and also write a 12-credit thesis. The main difference from the US is that we don't get that much perspective, as all we study is law.
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Mila

Hannenyh, I think the people who have good grades might have better chances to get good jobs, but in general it seems that being an active member of a student association might lead to the same result. So, there are many things that can substitute for not so good grades. Many of my friends who didn't have really good grades found really good jobs. And also those who dont have good grades nor extra curricular activities will find themselves a decent job (but at the smaller law firms). It is a bit of a cultural thing I guess. But there are little incentives to work really hard, at least as a student. (the hard work comes after that)
Also, we don't have any selection to get into law school. Everyone just gets in where he or she applies (We have 9 law schools in total). The only thing is that you need to complete a certain type of high school (which takes from 12-18). I believe it's the same in Germany actually.
Well, its interesting to compare these differences between countries. It seems that we have the easy lives though.

Hannenyh, I think the people who have good grades might have better chances to get good jobs, but in general it seems that being an active member of a student association might lead to the same result. So, there are many things that can substitute for not so good grades. Many of my friends who didn't have really good grades found really good jobs. And also those who don’t have good grades nor extra curricular activities will find themselves a decent job (but at the smaller law firms). It is a bit of a cultural thing I guess. But there are little incentives to work really hard, at least as a student. (the hard work comes after that)
Also, we don't have any selection to get into law school. Everyone just gets in where he or she applies (We have 9 law schools in total). The only thing is that you need to complete a certain type of high school (which takes from 12-18). I believe it's the same in Germany actually.
Well, it’s interesting to compare these differences between countries. It seems that we have the easy lives though.
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gar33

In Portugal law school is also free, undergraduate studies and there is (almost) no merit benchmark to get in. Someone may also combine a minor with his/her law major. I will graduate this summer with a major in law and a minor in economics.

However, grades matter a lot, not only if the goal is research and teaching, but also if you just want a nice job in a leading law firm. Of course, you don't have to be a nerd :-) Actually, it is very helpefull not to be or look like one!

In Portugal law school is also free, undergraduate studies and there is (almost) no merit benchmark to get in. Someone may also combine a minor with his/her law major. I will graduate this summer with a major in law and a minor in economics.

However, grades matter a lot, not only if the goal is research and teaching, but also if you just want a nice job in a leading law firm. Of course, you don't have to be a nerd :-) Actually, it is very helpefull not to be or look like one!

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josepidal

I guess it's a good thing to start early and only have 4 years of school if you want to do i.e. an LLM afterwards.

I'm from the Philippines and they require a four-year undergraduate degree before you can take a four-year law degree. EIGHT years.

<blockquote>I guess it's a good thing to start early and only have 4 years of school if you want to do i.e. an LLM afterwards. </blockquote>
I'm from the Philippines and they require a four-year undergraduate degree before you can take a four-year law degree. EIGHT years.
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gar33

Yeah... Terrible thing. I didn't understand if you're critical about your countrie's system or not, but I find 8 years absurd...

Anyways, the protuguese system, which is the most common system in civil law countries, is also pretty bad. I like the american system: 3+3. It makes a lot of sense.

Yeah... Terrible thing. I didn't understand if you're critical about your countrie's system or not, but I find 8 years absurd...

Anyways, the protuguese system, which is the most common system in civil law countries, is also pretty bad. I like the american system: 3+3. It makes a lot of sense.

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HAL

I'm 34...............

I'm 34...............
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Gevurah

35 here...
got the first law degree in 22,
completed graduate study and military service in 25,
passed the bar exam in 27,
2 years of probation in the Court and Prosecutors office, etc.,
has been practicing law for 6 years as an attorney...

35 here...
got the first law degree in 22,
completed graduate study and military service in 25,
passed the bar exam in 27,
2 years of probation in the Court and Prosecutors office, etc.,
has been practicing law for 6 years as an attorney...
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hannenyh

I like the american system: 3+3. It makes a lot of sense.


The American system is 4+3, so 7 years.

<blockquote>I like the american system: 3+3. It makes a lot of sense.
</blockquote>

The American system is 4+3, so 7 years.
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Igorek

I am 26 now..
And will be 27 at HLS taken over NYU.
In Russia legal studies usually take 5 years and begin right after the school when you are around 17 or 18 years old. Then if you like you can continue with Ph.D in law which takes you 3 year more.
And this is my case, i.e. 8 years in legal studies totally.

I am 26 now..
And will be 27 at HLS taken over NYU.
In Russia legal studies usually take 5 years and begin right after the school when you are around 17 or 18 years old. Then if you like you can continue with Ph.D in law which takes you 3 year more.
And this is my case, i.e. 8 years in legal studies totally.
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adm2006

I am 26 now..
And will be 27 at HLS taken over NYU.
In Russia legal studies usually take 5 years and begin right after the school when you are around 17 or 18 years old. Then if you like you can continue with Ph.D in law which takes you 3 year more.
And this is my case, i.e. 8 years in legal studies totally.


Hi, Igorek! Have you been admitted to HLS already? :)

<blockquote>I am 26 now..
And will be 27 at HLS taken over NYU.
In Russia legal studies usually take 5 years and begin right after the school when you are around 17 or 18 years old. Then if you like you can continue with Ph.D in law which takes you 3 year more.
And this is my case, i.e. 8 years in legal studies totally. </blockquote>

Hi, Igorek! Have you been admitted to HLS already? :)
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marody

What I really meant to ask is not the age of those admitted but the age of those admitted and coming...
The aim is to know the average age of the students we will meet at NYU and not those we will never meet as they will be going to HBS....

What I really meant to ask is not the age of those admitted but the age of those admitted and coming...
The aim is to know the average age of the students we will meet at NYU and not those we will never meet as they will be going to HBS....
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Mila

Come on! Don't be so hostile! You will not be able to talk to all of the NYU admitted/accepted students anyway, so this board is probaly a nice sample.
And in my opinion we were having an interesting discussion here...

Come on! Don't be so hostile! You will not be able to talk to all of the NYU admitted/accepted students anyway, so this board is probaly a nice sample.
And in my opinion we were having an interesting discussion here...
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marody

Mila,
I didn't mean to be hostile. sorry if you misunderstood me.
are you going to NYU?

Mila,
I didn't mean to be hostile. sorry if you misunderstood me.
are you going to NYU?
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rippy

I am 25 and coming to NYU! - got my law degree aged 21, fyi.

I am 25 and coming to NYU! - got my law degree aged 21, fyi.
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subslaw

hi, I am 24 finished law degree at 22 . I am from India........most likely to take up NYU but since dont have funding am not so sure.......

hi, I am 24 finished law degree at 22 . I am from India........most likely to take up NYU but since dont have funding am not so sure.......
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scotty

Hey all...i am 27...3 yrs of undergrad...3 yrs of lawschool...n 3 years of work...n is it just me or everybody seems to have made it to NYU...

Hey all...i am 27...3 yrs of undergrad...3 yrs of lawschool...n 3 years of work...n is it just me or everybody seems to have made it to NYU...
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Mint

Hi all!

I am going to be 26 this June. :D
4 years for LL.B/1 year for the Bar/ 1 year for my current LLM....never work

Hi all!

I am going to be 26 this June. :D
4 years for LL.B/1 year for the Bar/ 1 year for my current LLM....never work
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ivan2006

Hi, I´ll complete my previous post: I´m 28, 5 years of Law School, 1 year for an LLM in Spain, 2 years for a PhD (part-time), 5 years of work. See you at NYC!!!

Hi, I´ll complete my previous post: I´m 28, 5 years of Law School, 1 year for an LLM in Spain, 2 years for a PhD (part-time), 5 years of work. See you at NYC!!!
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marody

all those who already hold an LLM or even PhD - why are you going for another LLM at NYU?!?

all those who already hold an LLM or even PhD - why are you going for another LLM at NYU?!?
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