Harvard e-mail


specialK

In the last few years they have first sent an e-mail to all those who have been accepted, and this is then followed up with a FedEx package. Those who are not accepted are sent a letter informing them of this (but they don't receive any e-mail).

I believe they send the e-mail because they release the decisions as soon as the process is complete and they realise the FedEx will take a while to arrive.

It really is just a waiting game I'm afraid. Let me know if you have any more questions though.

In the last few years they have first sent an e-mail to all those who have been accepted, and this is then followed up with a FedEx package. Those who are not accepted are sent a letter informing them of this (but they don't receive any e-mail).

I believe they send the e-mail because they release the decisions as soon as the process is complete and they realise the FedEx will take a while to arrive.

It really is just a waiting game I'm afraid. Let me know if you have any more questions though.
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lawadd08

Hey specialK,

I understand that your at Harvard right now.. Although this may be a very subjective and vague question with possibly no concrete answer to it.. However since the persistent wait is quite unbearable, I thought I'd pop it anyway...

1. How can one evaluate his/her chances of getting into HLS? and
2. Would cracking through about 4-5 top 14 law schools so far speak of the strength of ones application and thus attaching a significant chance at cracking HLS?

Hey specialK,

I understand that your at Harvard right now.. Although this may be a very subjective and vague question with possibly no concrete answer to it.. However since the persistent wait is quite unbearable, I thought I'd pop it anyway...

1. How can one evaluate his/her chances of getting into HLS? and
2. Would cracking through about 4-5 top 14 law schools so far speak of the strength of ones application and thus attaching a significant chance at cracking HLS?
quote
specialK

The first to say is that I in no way speak for Harvard, so any thoughts I have to offer are purely my own, based on my experience.

And I'm afraid that it is rather difficult to respond constructively to (1). I suppose anything I say will repeat what you probably already know - your chances are higher with stronger academics; strong references; broad extra-curricular experience (American schools place a lot of emphasis on this), a undegraduate/graduate degree from a strong school in your home country (understandably Harvard looks more favourably on degrees from higher ranked schools); an insightful and clear personal statement (i.e. a sense of where the LLM fits into your career plans and a clear indication of what you want to get it from it, intellectually); a cogent and articulate essay (applications are reviewed by faculty in addition to admissions staff, so they will be looking for interesting ideas and strong writing ability).

From my own informal observations (i.e. gauging inductively from my yeargroup) it seems the following things also really help: a supreme court clerkship in your own country (in the welcome address Dean Kagan boasted about the number of LLM's who had completed clerkships); participation (and ideally success) in a prestigious competition (e.g. Jessup); and strong non-academic dimension to your resume (whether sport, music, drama or something else which shows that you are likely to be an interesting person to have around).

Bear in mind that there are people here who have all and none of these things. And once again these are just my thoughts.

As regards (2), of course that is a good sign, but likewise not determinative. For my part thats how it worked - I was accepted by everwhere else and then by HLS. But I was still quite shocked when the news came in.

I'm sorry the process is so long. I hope this information helped a little. Let me know if you have any more questions.

The first to say is that I in no way speak for Harvard, so any thoughts I have to offer are purely my own, based on my experience.

And I'm afraid that it is rather difficult to respond constructively to (1). I suppose anything I say will repeat what you probably already know - your chances are higher with stronger academics; strong references; broad extra-curricular experience (American schools place a lot of emphasis on this), a undegraduate/graduate degree from a strong school in your home country (understandably Harvard looks more favourably on degrees from higher ranked schools); an insightful and clear personal statement (i.e. a sense of where the LLM fits into your career plans and a clear indication of what you want to get it from it, intellectually); a cogent and articulate essay (applications are reviewed by faculty in addition to admissions staff, so they will be looking for interesting ideas and strong writing ability).

From my own informal observations (i.e. gauging inductively from my yeargroup) it seems the following things also really help: a supreme court clerkship in your own country (in the welcome address Dean Kagan boasted about the number of LLM's who had completed clerkships); participation (and ideally success) in a prestigious competition (e.g. Jessup); and strong non-academic dimension to your resume (whether sport, music, drama or something else which shows that you are likely to be an interesting person to have around).

Bear in mind that there are people here who have all and none of these things. And once again these are just my thoughts.

As regards (2), of course that is a good sign, but likewise not determinative. For my part thats how it worked - I was accepted by everwhere else and then by HLS. But I was still quite shocked when the news came in.

I'm sorry the process is so long. I hope this information helped a little. Let me know if you have any more questions.
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lawadd08

thnx specialk.. appreciate it

thnx specialk.. appreciate it
quote
aishisha78

The first to say is that I in no way speak for Harvard, so any thoughts I have to offer are purely my own, based on my experience.

And I'm afraid that it is rather difficult to respond constructively to (1). I suppose anything I say will repeat what you probably already know - your chances are higher with stronger academics; strong references; broad extra-curricular experience (American schools place a lot of emphasis on this), a undegraduate/graduate degree from a strong school in your home country (understandably Harvard looks more favourably on degrees from higher ranked schools); an insightful and clear personal statement (i.e. a sense of where the LLM fits into your career plans and a clear indication of what you want to get it from it, intellectually); a cogent and articulate essay (applications are reviewed by faculty in addition to admissions staff, so they will be looking for interesting ideas and strong writing ability).

From my own informal observations (i.e. gauging inductively from my yeargroup) it seems the following things also really help: a supreme court clerkship in your own country (in the welcome address Dean Kagan boasted about the number of LLM's who had completed clerkships); participation (and ideally success) in a prestigious competition (e.g. Jessup); and strong non-academic dimension to your resume (whether sport, music, drama or something else which shows that you are likely to be an interesting person to have around).

Bear in mind that there are people here who have all and none of these things. And once again these are just my thoughts.

As regards (2), of course that is a good sign, but likewise not determinative. For my part thats how it worked - I was accepted by everwhere else and then by HLS. But I was still quite shocked when the news came in.

I'm sorry the process is so long. I hope this information helped a little. Let me know if you have any more questions.


Thanks a lot for having shared your own experience with us...I am also still wiating for a reply from HLS. What I really would like to know is how much TOEFL actually inflenced the choice? Since u did not mention it I was wondering whether a student with strong academics, letters of references and work experiences (even abroad) but with a low TOEFL has a change to be admitted or not? As a matter of fact, I personally believe to have all the things you mentined in your post but the TOEFL (which is lower than requested)...Do u think that I still have a chance?
Thanks a lot?

<blockquote>The first to say is that I in no way speak for Harvard, so any thoughts I have to offer are purely my own, based on my experience.

And I'm afraid that it is rather difficult to respond constructively to (1). I suppose anything I say will repeat what you probably already know - your chances are higher with stronger academics; strong references; broad extra-curricular experience (American schools place a lot of emphasis on this), a undegraduate/graduate degree from a strong school in your home country (understandably Harvard looks more favourably on degrees from higher ranked schools); an insightful and clear personal statement (i.e. a sense of where the LLM fits into your career plans and a clear indication of what you want to get it from it, intellectually); a cogent and articulate essay (applications are reviewed by faculty in addition to admissions staff, so they will be looking for interesting ideas and strong writing ability).

From my own informal observations (i.e. gauging inductively from my yeargroup) it seems the following things also really help: a supreme court clerkship in your own country (in the welcome address Dean Kagan boasted about the number of LLM's who had completed clerkships); participation (and ideally success) in a prestigious competition (e.g. Jessup); and strong non-academic dimension to your resume (whether sport, music, drama or something else which shows that you are likely to be an interesting person to have around).

Bear in mind that there are people here who have all and none of these things. And once again these are just my thoughts.

As regards (2), of course that is a good sign, but likewise not determinative. For my part thats how it worked - I was accepted by everwhere else and then by HLS. But I was still quite shocked when the news came in.

I'm sorry the process is so long. I hope this information helped a little. Let me know if you have any more questions.</blockquote>

Thanks a lot for having shared your own experience with us...I am also still wiating for a reply from HLS. What I really would like to know is how much TOEFL actually inflenced the choice? Since u did not mention it I was wondering whether a student with strong academics, letters of references and work experiences (even abroad) but with a low TOEFL has a change to be admitted or not? As a matter of fact, I personally believe to have all the things you mentined in your post but the TOEFL (which is lower than requested)...Do u think that I still have a chance?
Thanks a lot?
quote
specialK

Apologies for not mentioning TOEFL, which I know is a factor. Unfortunately I can't offer any advice on that for the reason that I am a native English speaker. I really don't know the first thing aout TOEFL - sorry :-(

You reminded me about work experience too - lots of the LLMs have a few (and in some cases 8 or 9) years of work experience. That can only count in your favour. But it certainly is not a prerequisite - I have none (other than internships).

One final thing I forgot to mention, which is widely known I'm sure, is that it matters to some degree which country you are from. Whilst, as I understand it, there is no formal system allocating certain numbers of places to certain countries, it will help if there are fewer applicants from you country. This is for the obvious reason that the program is meant to be international (there are around 60 countries represented in the current LLM yeargroup). They therefore will not admit too many people from one country. So essentially you need first of all to be in the top few of the applicants from your country, and then hope that they like you enough to include you in the 150.

Apologies for not mentioning TOEFL, which I know is a factor. Unfortunately I can't offer any advice on that for the reason that I am a native English speaker. I really don't know the first thing aout TOEFL - sorry :-(

You reminded me about work experience too - lots of the LLMs have a few (and in some cases 8 or 9) years of work experience. That can only count in your favour. But it certainly is not a prerequisite - I have none (other than internships).

One final thing I forgot to mention, which is widely known I'm sure, is that it matters to some degree which country you are from. Whilst, as I understand it, there is no formal system allocating certain numbers of places to certain countries, it will help if there are fewer applicants from you country. This is for the obvious reason that the program is meant to be international (there are around 60 countries represented in the current LLM yeargroup). They therefore will not admit too many people from one country. So essentially you need first of all to be in the top few of the applicants from your country, and then hope that they like you enough to include you in the 150.
quote
aishisha78

Thanks a lot specialK for your promt answer...
Unfortunately I guess that many people coming from my country apply to HLS every year...and my TOEFL still remain my major problem...So the only thing I can do now is to take again the test...

Thanks a lot specialK for your promt answer...
Unfortunately I guess that many people coming from my country apply to HLS every year...and my TOEFL still remain my major problem...So the only thing I can do now is to take again the test...

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The Counse...

No second e-mail yet.

Anyone else in the same position?

No second e-mail yet.

Anyone else in the same position?
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D_D

Me too... :(

Me too... :(
quote

Nothing Yet for me too.
FYI, I received to Application Complete mail on the 23/12.

Best of luck.

Nothing Yet for me too.
FYI, I received to Application Complete mail on the 23/12.

Best of luck.
quote
amstel

Nothing Yet for me too.
FYI, I received to Application Complete mail on the 23/12.

Best of luck.



So you received the 2nd e_mail. It is the one stating your application is complete... :)

DD and the Counsel, may be should you contact the admissions office to check that nothing is wrong with your application...

<blockquote>Nothing Yet for me too.
FYI, I received to Application Complete mail on the 23/12.

Best of luck.</blockquote>


So you received the 2nd e_mail. It is the one stating your application is complete... :)

DD and the Counsel, may be should you contact the admissions office to check that nothing is wrong with your application...
quote
The Counse...

Since I didnt received the 2nd e-mail, two days a go I called the admission office at HLS, and they told me that my application is considered complete.

So dont worry if you didnt received the 2nd e-mail, no news means good news.

They also told me that decisions will be made late March.

Since I didn’t received the 2nd e-mail, two days a go I called the admission office at HLS, and they told me that my application is considered complete.

So don’t worry if you didn’t received the 2nd e-mail, no news means good news.

They also told me that decisions will be made late March.
quote
The Counse...

no news of any kind,

anyone have something?

no news of any kind,

anyone have something?
quote
Jammin

Nope...apparently they will start sending out decisions around March 20th...I really hope to hear from HLS sooner than that!

Nope...apparently they will start sending out decisions around March 20th...I really hope to hear from HLS sooner than that!
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The Counse...

Apparently someone already received an admission letter from HLS. I read it in other blog, but I believe this person is bluffing!

Has someone received news yet from HLS?

Thanks so much

Apparently someone already received an admission letter from HLS. I read it in other blog, but I believe this person is bluffing!

Has someone received news yet from HLS?

Thanks so much

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Hi Counsel,

Could you tell us which other blog you are reading?
Thanks

Hi Counsel,

Could you tell us which other blog you are reading?
Thanks
quote

Link to the blog please??????

Link to the blog please??????
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The Counse...

http://www.lawyrs.net/

http://www.lawyrs.net/

quote

quote

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