Any one received LSE offer?


cng1238

I got an unconditional offer today. Best luck to all of you!


Congratulations to you and others getting an offer, it is one of the proudest moments of my life.

<blockquote>I got an unconditional offer today. Best luck to all of you!</blockquote>

Congratulations to you and others getting an offer, it is one of the proudest moments of my life.
quote
osantosd

Congratulations to you too, cng! Hopefully we'll see each other in the UK!

All the best!

Congratulations to you too, cng! Hopefully we'll see each other in the UK!

All the best!
quote
Panika

Received an unconditional offer.
Now I need to figure out what to do... UCL or LSE?

Thank you all and good luck.

Received an unconditional offer.
Now I need to figure out what to do... UCL or LSE?

Thank you all and good luck.
quote
Panika

They require some original copies of documents.

Can anyone here please write the exact LSE address of where they should be sent to?

Thanks!

They require some original copies of documents.

Can anyone here please write the exact LSE address of where they should be sent to?

Thanks!
quote
osantosd

Maybe it's this one:

University of London - The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
Law Department
Lucy Wright
LLM Exams and Admissions Administrator
New Academic Building 6.14
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

Maybe it's this one:

University of London - The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
Law Department
Lucy Wright
LLM Exams and Admissions Administrator
New Academic Building 6.14
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom
quote
Blinx

I also received an offer. I applied to the general LLM. My application was complete on December 21st. Good luck to those still waiting!

I also received an offer. I applied to the general LLM. My application was complete on December 21st. Good luck to those still waiting!
quote
axel

I applied on 21st January, just received my rejection letter. Hope to hear from other Unis.

I applied on 21st January, just received my rejection letter. Hope to hear from other Unis.
quote
payens

I have applied January 12, but my second reference was received just January 24. So, which is the day that really counts as the submission day: 12 or 24?

Thanks in advance ;)

I have applied January 12, but my second reference was received just January 24. So, which is the day that really counts as the submission day: 12 or 24?

Thanks in advance ;)
quote
effloresce

Just my opinion, but i think it's more likely to be the 24th as it's then that your application would be complete.

Just my opinion, but i think it's more likely to be the 24th as it's then that your application would be complete.
quote
rkarthik87

As per the LSE web site

"Your application is held in the admissions office whilst we wait for your outstanding documents to be arrive.

Once your application is complete you will receive a final email informing you that your file has been sent to the department. This is the beginning of the selection process. On average, final decisions will be made 6-8 weeks from the time your application is sent to the department."

Hence, your application would be processed on 24th and not 12th.

The link is below:

http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/graduate/applicant/decisionMaking/2completeApplication.aspx

As per the LSE web site

"Your application is held in the admissions office whilst we wait for your outstanding documents to be arrive.

Once your application is complete you will receive a final email informing you that your file has been sent to the department. This is the beginning of the selection process. On average, final decisions will be made 6-8 weeks from the time your application is sent to the department."

Hence, your application would be processed on 24th and not 12th.

The link is below:

http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/graduate/applicant/decisionMaking/2completeApplication.aspx
quote
payens

UNCONDITIONAL OFFER!!! :DD

No scholarship, though, but awaiting an award.

For the records:
Brazilian
LLB completed in 2007
All documents submitted at 24th January

Good luck for you all and I hope to see you soon!

UNCONDITIONAL OFFER!!! :DD

No scholarship, though, but awaiting an award.

For the records:
Brazilian
LLB completed in 2007
All documents submitted at 24th January

Good luck for you all and I hope to see you soon!
quote
Roamer

UCL or LSE for LLM in Public International Law?

It seems to be the general perception, gauged from discussions with several solictors in practice in the UK, that LSE is no longer what it was, and that UCL is a far better option. LSE's global university rankings also leave a lot to be desired - UCL consistently outperfoms it.

Apologies if this is more of the same but I am not inclined to empty my savings account for what may amount to an average LLM.

Does anybody have any insightful comments? How do the two really compare in the LLM field? I accept that LSE has a better name brand globally - but has anybody received feedback as to the quality of the teaching at LSE these days?

UCL or LSE for LLM in Public International Law?

It seems to be the general perception, gauged from discussions with several solictors in practice in the UK, that LSE is no longer what it was, and that UCL is a far better option. LSE's global university rankings also leave a lot to be desired - UCL consistently outperfoms it.

Apologies if this is more of the same but I am not inclined to empty my savings account for what may amount to an average LLM.

Does anybody have any insightful comments? How do the two really compare in the LLM field? I accept that LSE has a better name brand globally - but has anybody received feedback as to the quality of the teaching at LSE these days?
quote

I have a question... im currently doing my llb at KCL. im wondering if the conditional offer would be conditional upon obtaining a first class or a 2:1?

I have a question... im currently doing my llb at KCL. im wondering if the conditional offer would be conditional upon obtaining a first class or a 2:1?
quote
cng1238

UCL or LSE for LLM in Public International Law?

It seems to be the general perception, gauged from discussions with several solictors in practice in the UK, that LSE is no longer what it was, and that UCL is a far better option. LSE's global university rankings also leave a lot to be desired - UCL consistently outperfoms it.

Apologies if this is more of the same but I am not inclined to empty my savings account for what may amount to an average LLM.

Does anybody have any insightful comments? How do the two really compare in the LLM field? I accept that LSE has a better name brand globally - but has anybody received feedback as to the quality of the teaching at LSE these days?


I am in the same boat as you, receiving both UCL and LSE offers and not sure how to decide.

My interest areas are public law and human rights law. On the modules it seems UCL has better (and more interesting) choices but its reputation in my country is not to be compared with LSE.

In terms of quality of teaching, I have this feeling that they are at the similar level. In fact I have heard this theory that quite often it is not so much to do with the quality of teaching but the quality of students they accepted to make them a (perceived) great school. This is a chicken and egg situation: you produce the best students because you only take the best ones in the first place.

It follows that, if LSE is in the position to take the best students to study for a UK LLM (or most of them apart from those went to Oxbridge), its leading position will be safe despite whether its "quality of teaching" is deteriorating,

The sad reality (at least in my country) is that, most people, even the legal field as I understand it, tend to ignore what you actually learned from the LLM but to think that "he must be good because that school is difficult to get in."

<blockquote>UCL or LSE for LLM in Public International Law?

It seems to be the general perception, gauged from discussions with several solictors in practice in the UK, that LSE is no longer what it was, and that UCL is a far better option. LSE's global university rankings also leave a lot to be desired - UCL consistently outperfoms it.

Apologies if this is more of the same but I am not inclined to empty my savings account for what may amount to an average LLM.

Does anybody have any insightful comments? How do the two really compare in the LLM field? I accept that LSE has a better name brand globally - but has anybody received feedback as to the quality of the teaching at LSE these days?
</blockquote>

I am in the same boat as you, receiving both UCL and LSE offers and not sure how to decide.

My interest areas are public law and human rights law. On the modules it seems UCL has better (and more interesting) choices but its reputation in my country is not to be compared with LSE.

In terms of quality of teaching, I have this feeling that they are at the similar level. In fact I have heard this theory that quite often it is not so much to do with the quality of teaching but the quality of students they accepted to make them a (perceived) great school. This is a chicken and egg situation: you produce the best students because you only take the best ones in the first place.

It follows that, if LSE is in the position to take the best students to study for a UK LLM (or most of them apart from those went to Oxbridge), its leading position will be safe despite whether its "quality of teaching" is deteriorating,

The sad reality (at least in my country) is that, most people, even the legal field as I understand it, tend to ignore what you actually learned from the LLM but to think that "he must be good because that school is difficult to get in."
quote
Panika

UCL or LSE for LLM in Public International Law?

It seems to be the general perception, gauged from discussions with several solictors in practice in the UK, that LSE is no longer what it was, and that UCL is a far better option. LSE's global university rankings also leave a lot to be desired - UCL consistently outperfoms it.

Apologies if this is more of the same but I am not inclined to empty my savings account for what may amount to an average LLM.

Does anybody have any insightful comments? How do the two really compare in the LLM field? I accept that LSE has a better name brand globally - but has anybody received feedback as to the quality of the teaching at LSE these days?


I am in the same boat as you, receiving both UCL and LSE offers and not sure how to decide.

My interest areas are public law and human rights law. On the modules it seems UCL has better (and more interesting) choices but its reputation in my country is not to be compared with LSE.

In terms of quality of teaching, I have this feeling that they are at the similar level. In fact I have heard this theory that quite often it is not so much to do with the quality of teaching but the quality of students they accepted to make them a (perceived) great school. This is a chicken and egg situation: you produce the best students because you only take the best ones in the first place.

It follows that, if LSE is in the position to take the best students to study for a UK LLM (or most of them apart from those went to Oxbridge), its leading position will be safe despite whether its "quality of teaching" is deteriorating,

The sad reality (at least in my country) is that, most people, even the legal field as I understand it, tend to ignore what you actually learned from the LLM but to think that "he must be good because that school is difficult to get in."


Hi, I'm in the same position as you (received offers both from LSE and UCL). Regarding to what you wrote - which one of those universities is harder to be accepted to?

<blockquote><blockquote>UCL or LSE for LLM in Public International Law?

It seems to be the general perception, gauged from discussions with several solictors in practice in the UK, that LSE is no longer what it was, and that UCL is a far better option. LSE's global university rankings also leave a lot to be desired - UCL consistently outperfoms it.

Apologies if this is more of the same but I am not inclined to empty my savings account for what may amount to an average LLM.

Does anybody have any insightful comments? How do the two really compare in the LLM field? I accept that LSE has a better name brand globally - but has anybody received feedback as to the quality of the teaching at LSE these days?
</blockquote>

I am in the same boat as you, receiving both UCL and LSE offers and not sure how to decide.

My interest areas are public law and human rights law. On the modules it seems UCL has better (and more interesting) choices but its reputation in my country is not to be compared with LSE.

In terms of quality of teaching, I have this feeling that they are at the similar level. In fact I have heard this theory that quite often it is not so much to do with the quality of teaching but the quality of students they accepted to make them a (perceived) great school. This is a chicken and egg situation: you produce the best students because you only take the best ones in the first place.

It follows that, if LSE is in the position to take the best students to study for a UK LLM (or most of them apart from those went to Oxbridge), its leading position will be safe despite whether its "quality of teaching" is deteriorating,

The sad reality (at least in my country) is that, most people, even the legal field as I understand it, tend to ignore what you actually learned from the LLM but to think that "he must be good because that school is difficult to get in."</blockquote>

Hi, I'm in the same position as you (received offers both from LSE and UCL). Regarding to what you wrote - which one of those universities is harder to be accepted to?
quote
cng1238

UCL or LSE for LLM in Public International Law?

It seems to be the general perception, gauged from discussions with several solictors in practice in the UK, that LSE is no longer what it was, and that UCL is a far better option. LSE's global university rankings also leave a lot to be desired - UCL consistently outperfoms it.

Apologies if this is more of the same but I am not inclined to empty my savings account for what may amount to an average LLM.

Does anybody have any insightful comments? How do the two really compare in the LLM field? I accept that LSE has a better name brand globally - but has anybody received feedback as to the quality of the teaching at LSE these days?


I am in the same boat as you, receiving both UCL and LSE offers and not sure how to decide.

My interest areas are public law and human rights law. On the modules it seems UCL has better (and more interesting) choices but its reputation in my country is not to be compared with LSE.

In terms of quality of teaching, I have this feeling that they are at the similar level. In fact I have heard this theory that quite often it is not so much to do with the quality of teaching but the quality of students they accepted to make them a (perceived) great school. This is a chicken and egg situation: you produce the best students because you only take the best ones in the first place.

It follows that, if LSE is in the position to take the best students to study for a UK LLM (or most of them apart from those went to Oxbridge), its leading position will be safe despite whether its "quality of teaching" is deteriorating,

The sad reality (at least in my country) is that, most people, even the legal field as I understand it, tend to ignore what you actually learned from the LLM but to think that "he must be good because that school is difficult to get in."


Hi, I'm in the same position as you (received offers both from LSE and UCL). Regarding to what you wrote - which one of those universities is harder to be accepted to?


I think the perception is LSE.

<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>UCL or LSE for LLM in Public International Law?

It seems to be the general perception, gauged from discussions with several solictors in practice in the UK, that LSE is no longer what it was, and that UCL is a far better option. LSE's global university rankings also leave a lot to be desired - UCL consistently outperfoms it.

Apologies if this is more of the same but I am not inclined to empty my savings account for what may amount to an average LLM.

Does anybody have any insightful comments? How do the two really compare in the LLM field? I accept that LSE has a better name brand globally - but has anybody received feedback as to the quality of the teaching at LSE these days?
</blockquote>

I am in the same boat as you, receiving both UCL and LSE offers and not sure how to decide.

My interest areas are public law and human rights law. On the modules it seems UCL has better (and more interesting) choices but its reputation in my country is not to be compared with LSE.

In terms of quality of teaching, I have this feeling that they are at the similar level. In fact I have heard this theory that quite often it is not so much to do with the quality of teaching but the quality of students they accepted to make them a (perceived) great school. This is a chicken and egg situation: you produce the best students because you only take the best ones in the first place.

It follows that, if LSE is in the position to take the best students to study for a UK LLM (or most of them apart from those went to Oxbridge), its leading position will be safe despite whether its "quality of teaching" is deteriorating,

The sad reality (at least in my country) is that, most people, even the legal field as I understand it, tend to ignore what you actually learned from the LLM but to think that "he must be good because that school is difficult to get in."</blockquote>

Hi, I'm in the same position as you (received offers both from LSE and UCL). Regarding to what you wrote - which one of those universities is harder to be accepted to?
</blockquote>

I think the perception is LSE.
quote

I also received an offer from LSE and UCL and really can't decide where to go. Of course LSE is famous for its Economics department etc but if someone's interested in a "classic" Law education wouldn't UCL be the better choice?

Nevertheless I have the same problem... in Italy where I'm from most people would only know LSE.
IMHO - compared to UCL - LSE doesn't offer such a wide range of interesting Law courses. But maybe the few one's they offer are fabulous... who knows...

I'd be thankful if people would share their LSE/UCL-opinions.

I also received an offer from LSE and UCL and really can't decide where to go. Of course LSE is famous for its Economics department etc but if someone's interested in a "classic" Law education wouldn't UCL be the better choice?

Nevertheless I have the same problem... in Italy where I'm from most people would only know LSE.
IMHO - compared to UCL - LSE doesn't offer such a wide range of interesting Law courses. But maybe the few one's they offer are fabulous... who knows...

I'd be thankful if people would share their LSE/UCL-opinions.
quote
Panika

I also received an offer from LSE and UCL and really can't decide where to go. Of course LSE is famous for its Economics department etc but if someone's interested in a "classic" Law education wouldn't UCL be the better choice?

Nevertheless I have the same problem... in Italy where I'm from most people would only know LSE.
IMHO - compared to UCL - LSE doesn't offer such a wide range of interesting Law courses. But maybe the few one's they offer are fabulous... who knows...

I'd be thankful if people would share their LSE/UCL-opinions.


What are the formal rankings show?

<blockquote>I also received an offer from LSE and UCL and really can't decide where to go. Of course LSE is famous for its Economics department etc but if someone's interested in a "classic" Law education wouldn't UCL be the better choice?

Nevertheless I have the same problem... in Italy where I'm from most people would only know LSE.
IMHO - compared to UCL - LSE doesn't offer such a wide range of interesting Law courses. But maybe the few one's they offer are fabulous... who knows...

I'd be thankful if people would share their LSE/UCL-opinions. </blockquote>

What are the formal rankings show?
quote
Panika

I also received an offer from LSE and UCL and really can't decide where to go. Of course LSE is famous for its Economics department etc but if someone's interested in a "classic" Law education wouldn't UCL be the better choice?

Nevertheless I have the same problem... in Italy where I'm from most people would only know LSE.
IMHO - compared to UCL - LSE doesn't offer such a wide range of interesting Law courses. But maybe the few one's they offer are fabulous... who knows...

I'd be thankful if people would share their LSE/UCL-opinions.


What are the formal rankings show?


*showing

<blockquote><blockquote>I also received an offer from LSE and UCL and really can't decide where to go. Of course LSE is famous for its Economics department etc but if someone's interested in a "classic" Law education wouldn't UCL be the better choice?

Nevertheless I have the same problem... in Italy where I'm from most people would only know LSE.
IMHO - compared to UCL - LSE doesn't offer such a wide range of interesting Law courses. But maybe the few one's they offer are fabulous... who knows...

I'd be thankful if people would share their LSE/UCL-opinions. </blockquote>

What are the formal rankings show?
</blockquote>

*showing
quote
Roamer

There are a few, see for instance the Times Higher rankings - link below.

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/world-university-rankings/2011-2012/top-400.html

There are a few, see for instance the Times Higher rankings - link below.

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/world-university-rankings/2011-2012/top-400.html
quote

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