Coronavirus LLM 2020-2021


mm0702
Hey guys!

Does anyone know how universities are dealing with coronavirus outbreak?

I mean, is there any chance llm 2020-2021 program will be moved to online classes?

Good luck to everyone!
Hey guys!

Does anyone know how universities are dealing with coronavirus outbreak?

I mean, is there any chance llm 2020-2021 program will be moved to online classes?

Good luck to everyone!
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Brotem10
Hey guys!

Does anyone know how universities are dealing with coronavirus outbreak?

I mean, is there any chance llm 2020-2021 program will be moved to online classes?

Good luck to everyone!


Received an email today from Northwestern regarding this. They said they believe that ll will work normally, and if not they will be prepared.

Not sure.
[quote]Hey guys!

Does anyone know how universities are dealing with coronavirus outbreak?

I mean, is there any chance llm 2020-2021 program will be moved to online classes?

Good luck to everyone![/quote]

Received an email today from Northwestern regarding this. They said they believe that ll will work normally, and if not they will be prepared.

Not sure.
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KB888
In addition to the preparation, I am also concerned about bad views toward asian student like me. The news relating to this issue is not good.
In addition to the preparation, I am also concerned about bad views toward asian student like me. The news relating to this issue is not good.
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Leaves of ...
The fall term doesn't start before August and I'm pretty sure the epidemic will lose steam before then. It's almost 5 months away. I don't think it should impact incoming students in a way that we should have online classes.
The fall term doesn't start before August and I'm pretty sure the epidemic will lose steam before then. It's almost 5 months away. I don't think it should impact incoming students in a way that we should have online classes.
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M112
I haven’t heard anything from schools I’ve been admitted to. My biggest concern is that we have to make commitments pretty soon and we are not even sure if we’ll be able to travel. Yes, schools are likely prepared to go online, but that’s not what we signed up for.

Anyone thinking of asking extensions to commit? Or does anyone know if schools can give extensions?
I haven’t heard anything from schools I’ve been admitted to. My biggest concern is that we have to make commitments pretty soon and we are not even sure if we’ll be able to travel. Yes, schools are likely prepared to go online, but that’s not what we signed up for.

Anyone thinking of asking extensions to commit? Or does anyone know if schools can give extensions?
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Uchicago offered to extend the deadline till May 1st, voluntarily. Not sure if other schools would follow.
Uchicago offered to extend the deadline till May 1st, voluntarily. Not sure if other schools would follow.
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newyear
Before committing, think it's time we ask ourselves whether it would be the best time to go to law school in the US if the current pandemic takes a toll on its economy, especially those seeking post-employment. I hope it will not be like the post-financial crisis period.
Before committing, think it's time we ask ourselves whether it would be the best time to go to law school in the US if the current pandemic takes a toll on its economy, especially those seeking post-employment. I hope it will not be like the post-financial crisis period.
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Coronavirus outbreak in the US is huge right now and the US job market is facing huge layoffs including law firm jobs. Realistically even JDs may have a tough time getting law firm jobs in this market especially transactional jobs. At this point NYC is facing a potential shelterinplace lockdown by the city mayor and so i think NYU and CLS admissions process may be delayed. Look up coronavirus news in New York. A lot of the streets are empty in the pictures which is way worse than the dot com bubble 20 years ago and the financial crisis 10 years ago and Trump has implemented war measures and national emergency measures. You shouldnt fear, but you should at least be aware of whats going on in the city through the news that youd be attending school at. Maybe NYU and CLS and other schools might offer online schooling but then it will have a bunch of visa issues and will be a tuition grab if you just take online courses without coming to the US. So dont fear but be aware of whats happening in the news and what goals you have. If your goal is to work in the US post graduation you should consider carefully whether it ll be realistic or even possible. My friends in the US are worried about losing ther jobs right now. Some schools may try to act like everythijg will be normal careerwise post graduation but being unrealistically optimistic about career chances might ruin someones life. Take care everyone
Coronavirus outbreak in the US is huge right now and the US job market is facing huge layoffs including law firm jobs. Realistically even JDs may have a tough time getting law firm jobs in this market especially transactional jobs. At this point NYC is facing a potential shelterinplace lockdown by the city mayor and so i think NYU and CLS admissions process may be delayed. Look up coronavirus news in New York. A lot of the streets are empty in the pictures which is way worse than the dot com bubble 20 years ago and the financial crisis 10 years ago and Trump has implemented war measures and national emergency measures. You shouldnt fear, but you should at least be aware of whats going on in the city through the news that youd be attending school at. Maybe NYU and CLS and other schools might offer online schooling but then it will have a bunch of visa issues and will be a tuition grab if you just take online courses without coming to the US. So dont fear but be aware of whats happening in the news and what goals you have. If your goal is to work in the US post graduation you should consider carefully whether it ll be realistic or even possible. My friends in the US are worried about losing ther jobs right now. Some schools may try to act like everythijg will be normal careerwise post graduation but being unrealistically optimistic about career chances might ruin someones life. Take care everyone
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Rote11
Coronavirus outbreak in the US is huge right now and the US job market is facing huge layoffs including law firm jobs. Realistically even JDs may have a tough time getting law firm jobs in this market especially transactional jobs. At this point NYC is facing a potential shelterinplace lockdown by the city mayor and so i think NYU and CLS admissions process may be delayed. Look up coronavirus news in New York. A lot of the streets are empty in the pictures which is way worse than the dot com bubble 20 years ago and the financial crisis 10 years ago and Trump has implemented war measures and national emergency measures. You shouldnt fear, but you should at least be aware of whats going on in the city through the news that youd be attending school at. Maybe NYU and CLS and other schools might offer online schooling but then it will have a bunch of visa issues and will be a tuition grab if you just take online courses without coming to the US. So dont fear but be aware of whats happening in the news and what goals you have. If your goal is to work in the US post graduation you should consider carefully whether it ll be realistic or even possible. My friends in the US are worried about losing ther jobs right now. Some schools may try to act like everythijg will be normal careerwise post graduation but being unrealistically optimistic about career chances might ruin someones life. Take care everyone


Thanks for this update. Puts everything into perspective.
[quote]Coronavirus outbreak in the US is huge right now and the US job market is facing huge layoffs including law firm jobs. Realistically even JDs may have a tough time getting law firm jobs in this market especially transactional jobs. At this point NYC is facing a potential shelterinplace lockdown by the city mayor and so i think NYU and CLS admissions process may be delayed. Look up coronavirus news in New York. A lot of the streets are empty in the pictures which is way worse than the dot com bubble 20 years ago and the financial crisis 10 years ago and Trump has implemented war measures and national emergency measures. You shouldnt fear, but you should at least be aware of whats going on in the city through the news that youd be attending school at. Maybe NYU and CLS and other schools might offer online schooling but then it will have a bunch of visa issues and will be a tuition grab if you just take online courses without coming to the US. So dont fear but be aware of whats happening in the news and what goals you have. If your goal is to work in the US post graduation you should consider carefully whether it ll be realistic or even possible. My friends in the US are worried about losing ther jobs right now. Some schools may try to act like everythijg will be normal careerwise post graduation but being unrealistically optimistic about career chances might ruin someones life. Take care everyone[/quote]

Thanks for this update. Puts everything into perspective.

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newyear
Thanks for the update. I fear this too. I think it's ok for those who get a full scholarship as there is nothing much to lose in that case. But if we are to leave our present jobs, then there is much to think, if this leads some economies into a recession.
Thanks for the update. I fear this too. I think it's ok for those who get a full scholarship as there is nothing much to lose in that case. But if we are to leave our present jobs, then there is much to think, if this leads some economies into a recession.
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NEJ18
I'm a little surprised by the tone of the conversation here. I think it is important to remain level-headed and pragmatic. The LLMs start mid-August, which is 5 months away. The job market we would compete on would therefore be relevant to us in almost a year and half, which is in quite a long period of time.

I understand the worries of the ones leaving jobs to pursue an LLM, and I encourage you to weigh in all parameters relevant to your specific situation, however I believe this thinking is a little alarmist for the time being as this situation is fairly new. The outbreak will most likely be contained by then, and even if it is not the case (which I highly doubt), the world will have adapted and the economy will go back up regardless. It has to. The world will not stop. People in China are already going back to work this week. In France where I am from, we are quarantined, but 1000 people have already been cured and successful clinical testing is being carried out at the moment.

Worst case scenario - If anything, everyone will be affected worldwide, LLM or not. This is a global crisis and I'm pretty sure the U.S. will be the first to pick its economy back up. Legal jobs are certainly not the most endagered ones at this time when compared to people who literally have no choice but to stop working and cannot work from home in their field. There is very little chance that universities will resort to online classes for the 2020-2021 academic year, as they are well aware that these diplomas will hold little to no value. I think the only students truly affected at the moment are the ones currently in an LLM. When it comes to the deposit, I believe that if attendance becomes impossible (VISA issues for example) schools will issue a specific policy.

I personally will commit to one of the universities I have been admitted to and secure my spot (with the very limited risk of losing it) rather than risk missing the opportunity of an LLM when the situation (very likely) goes back to normal.

I understand this is a deeply personal decision though- I just hope nobody spreads any type of panic right now when the situation is changing everyday.

[Edited by NEJ18 on Mar 18, 2020]

I'm a little surprised by the tone of the conversation here. I think it is important to remain level-headed and pragmatic. The LLMs start mid-August, which is 5 months away. The job market we would compete on would therefore be relevant to us in almost a year and half, which is in quite a long period of time.

I understand the worries of the ones leaving jobs to pursue an LLM, and I encourage you to weigh in all parameters relevant to your specific situation, however I believe this thinking is a little alarmist for the time being as this situation is fairly new. The outbreak will most likely be contained by then, and even if it is not the case (which I highly doubt), the world will have adapted and the economy will go back up regardless. It has to. The world will not stop. People in China are already going back to work this week. In France where I am from, we are quarantined, but 1000 people have already been cured and successful clinical testing is being carried out at the moment.

Worst case scenario - If anything, everyone will be affected worldwide, LLM or not. This is a global crisis and I'm pretty sure the U.S. will be the first to pick its economy back up. Legal jobs are certainly not the most endagered ones at this time when compared to people who literally have no choice but to stop working and cannot work from home in their field. There is very little chance that universities will resort to online classes for the 2020-2021 academic year, as they are well aware that these diplomas will hold little to no value. I think the only students truly affected at the moment are the ones currently in an LLM. When it comes to the deposit, I believe that if attendance becomes impossible (VISA issues for example) schools will issue a specific policy.

I personally will commit to one of the universities I have been admitted to and secure my spot (with the very limited risk of losing it) rather than risk missing the opportunity of an LLM when the situation (very likely) goes back to normal.

I understand this is a deeply personal decision though- I just hope nobody spreads any type of panic right now when the situation is changing everyday.
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Gunit93
I disagree with NEJ. That's the kind of unrealistic hope that will ruin people's lives. It's not panic. It's reality. You don't seem level-headed. All the news and experts are stating the U.S. economy is going to be worse than 2007 financial crisis, and you're encouraging people to go. Your encouragement is unethical. Many experts are saying that this coming recession will be worse than the Great Depression. People have been laid off at a U.S. firm today, and they say it's just the beginning. How can LLMs compete with JDs in the coming U.S. recession?? Worst case scenario - online schooling, visa issues, huge debt, no job prospect, lost income opportunity for a year, expensive Boston / NYC living, quarantine in a big city and having to stay home with a curfew. Best case scenario - school will resume normally but LLM job prospects will still be horrible
I disagree with NEJ. That's the kind of unrealistic hope that will ruin people's lives. It's not panic. It's reality. You don't seem level-headed. All the news and experts are stating the U.S. economy is going to be worse than 2007 financial crisis, and you're encouraging people to go. Your encouragement is unethical. Many experts are saying that this coming recession will be worse than the Great Depression. People have been laid off at a U.S. firm today, and they say it's just the beginning. How can LLMs compete with JDs in the coming U.S. recession?? Worst case scenario - online schooling, visa issues, huge debt, no job prospect, lost income opportunity for a year, expensive Boston / NYC living, quarantine in a big city and having to stay home with a curfew. Best case scenario - school will resume normally but LLM job prospects will still be horrible
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Syd2030
I really appreciate this level-headedness and positivity NEJ18. For my part, I'm Australian and work in a large law firm. I'm working from home indefinitely and everything feels extremely uncertain.
Essentially, I am going to make enquiries about anticipated deferral policies with the schools I have shortlisted and pay my deposit in April, hoping for the best. I'd definitely strongly reevaluate attending the LLM if in July it was still looking to be all online.

I'm hoping to speak to the partners I work for in the next week about the situation with the aim of getting a one year leave of absence (LOA) if all goes to plan with being able to leave. It's quite common at my firm... and will give me some peace of mind.

I feel sad for all of us, and the current LLMs who have been sent home early... but I feel more awful for all the people who have less options than we do right now
I really appreciate this level-headedness and positivity NEJ18. For my part, I'm Australian and work in a large law firm. I'm working from home indefinitely and everything feels extremely uncertain.
Essentially, I am going to make enquiries about anticipated deferral policies with the schools I have shortlisted and pay my deposit in April, hoping for the best. I'd definitely strongly reevaluate attending the LLM if in July it was still looking to be all online.

I'm hoping to speak to the partners I work for in the next week about the situation with the aim of getting a one year leave of absence (LOA) if all goes to plan with being able to leave. It's quite common at my firm... and will give me some peace of mind.

I feel sad for all of us, and the current LLMs who have been sent home early... but I feel more awful for all the people who have less options than we do right now
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Ships
The way I see it- there are two categories:

LLM graduates who want to go back to their home country- easy decision because you would have anyway returned home so the US market recession should not impact your decision. Unless you suspect that when you return, the US degree does not hold value. You will be starting at the same level when you quit your job, Here's the thing would you miss a chance of education in some of the best universities to (i) polish your skill and (ii) build a network. You are not going to be in a worse position.

For LLM graduates who want to stay back in the US- This gets trickier. In the best of times itself, LLM students have to hustle to get a job. When this economy is facing a recession, it gets tougher. For the positive people, no we are facing a recession as someone who is privy to the outlook of the top US banks and Venture Capital firms. Investments are going to slow and it's a bleak outlook. You know when a country starts doling out universal basic income to its citizens, how bad the situation is. In the worst of times, you need hustle and luck.
It is an individual's decision but come with your eyes wide open and assess the situation. US is heading towards a recession no doubt about it.
The way I see it- there are two categories:

LLM graduates who want to go back to their home country- easy decision because you would have anyway returned home so the US market recession should not impact your decision. Unless you suspect that when you return, the US degree does not hold value. You will be starting at the same level when you quit your job, Here's the thing would you miss a chance of education in some of the best universities to (i) polish your skill and (ii) build a network. You are not going to be in a worse position.

For LLM graduates who want to stay back in the US- This gets trickier. In the best of times itself, LLM students have to hustle to get a job. When this economy is facing a recession, it gets tougher. For the positive people, no we are facing a recession as someone who is privy to the outlook of the top US banks and Venture Capital firms. Investments are going to slow and it's a bleak outlook. You know when a country starts doling out universal basic income to its citizens, how bad the situation is. In the worst of times, you need hustle and luck.
It is an individual's decision but come with your eyes wide open and assess the situation. US is heading towards a recession no doubt about it.
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edx
Thanks for the above posts. Would love to hear similar assessments on pursuing an LLM from Oxbridge in 2020-21.
Thanks for the above posts. Would love to hear similar assessments on pursuing an LLM from Oxbridge in 2020-21.
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Ha7am9
Thanks for the above posts. Would love to hear similar assessments on pursuing an LLM from Oxbridge in 2020-21.


I would also like to know people’s views on this!
[quote]Thanks for the above posts. Would love to hear similar assessments on pursuing an LLM from Oxbridge in 2020-21. [/quote]

I would also like to know people’s views on this!
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Swjs
Its far too early to tell. We don't know what the long term effect of Covid 19 will be, and I don't think we have enough information to make an educated guess. As more information comes to light we will have a better picture - I suspect by the end of April we will have a much better idea of what is likely to happen.

LLM programmes do not start for 5 months (at the earliest - October for Oxbridge) and most people won't be applying for jobs until mid-2021 - 15-18 months away. Who knows what the market looks like then, or what impact, if any Covid 19 will continue to have. As much as I hate to say it, I think we all just need to sit tight for a bit, see which way the wind blows, and then pull the pin when we have some idea of what is going on.

In the meantime, the best strategy is to be flexible. Don't burn bridges or quit jobs, and don't withdraw applications. Hell, this might be the best year to do an LLM, given that the job market may be affected in the next twelve months, or it could mean that you finish up an LLM at the worst possible time. The biggest problem we face is that, for most LLM programmes, we have to make a commitment and pay a deposit by 1 April 2020, before we are really going to know the long term impacts. For what it is worth I am intending to make that payment, and then see what happens - I would rather sacrifice $1,000 then lose my place in a programme for 2020/2021.
Its far too early to tell. We don't know what the long term effect of Covid 19 will be, and I don't think we have enough information to make an educated guess. As more information comes to light we will have a better picture - I suspect by the end of April we will have a much better idea of what is likely to happen.

LLM programmes do not start for 5 months (at the earliest - October for Oxbridge) and most people won't be applying for jobs until mid-2021 - 15-18 months away. Who knows what the market looks like then, or what impact, if any Covid 19 will continue to have. As much as I hate to say it, I think we all just need to sit tight for a bit, see which way the wind blows, and then pull the pin when we have some idea of what is going on.

In the meantime, the best strategy is to be flexible. Don't burn bridges or quit jobs, and don't withdraw applications. Hell, this might be the best year to do an LLM, given that the job market may be affected in the next twelve months, or it could mean that you finish up an LLM at the worst possible time. The biggest problem we face is that, for most LLM programmes, we have to make a commitment and pay a deposit by 1 April 2020, before we are really going to know the long term impacts. For what it is worth I am intending to make that payment, and then see what happens - I would rather sacrifice $1,000 then lose my place in a programme for 2020/2021.
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Hey all

a friend of mine who applied for MsC in Taxation at Oxford received an email which said the following:

"We just wanted to provide you with an update on the current situation regarding COVID-19.

We currently hope that it will be possible to continue activity as normal next academic year. However, the situation is evolving very rapidly, and we are actively pursuing contingency plans for online delivery. We will seek to communicate these contingency plans as soon as possible."
Hey all

a friend of mine who applied for MsC in Taxation at Oxford received an email which said the following:

"We just wanted to provide you with an update on the current situation regarding COVID-19.

We currently hope that it will be possible to continue activity as normal next academic year. However, the situation is evolving very rapidly, and we are actively pursuing contingency plans for online delivery. We will seek to communicate these contingency plans as soon as possible."
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Hi,

With the spread of virus and uncertainty we definitely dont want online courses.

I think we should together ask our respective Universities to postpone the start of the course may be first quarter of 2021 if possible, worst case scenario.
Hi,

With the spread of virus and uncertainty we definitely dont want online courses.

I think we should together ask our respective Universities to postpone the start of the course may be first quarter of 2021 if possible, worst case scenario.



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