Comparative/International Law Only


Brainy Smu...
Greetings curious reader,

I am seeking information from applicants whose undergoing or undergone a specialised LLM in comparative/international law. I am not here to justify rather what uni ought to be considered the best. However, suggesting, what programme offers the best quantitative, not qualitative, analysis upon comparative/international law. I have been doing my own research upon post-graduate programmes soliciting a LLM in comparative/international law such as:

Leiden, Vienna, Copenhagen, NUS, Kent, Columbia/NYU, Chicago/Northwestern, UIUC, Stanford, Canturbury, Oslo, IE, IHEID, Utrecht, City (HK), Lund, Edinburgh, Cambridge, Ghent, Sussex, UCT, Indiana (IU), Indiana (Bloomington) ANU/Sydney, Iowa, Bangor, Helsinki, Trinity, Essex, UCL, QMUL, Aberystwyth, LSE, Nottingham, Swansea, Leicester, Michigan, SOAS, NUI, Peace, UBA, Heidelberg, McGill, CUPL, Tehran, Turin,Tel Aviv, Penn, Temple, Texas, UHLC, St. Mary's, UCLA/USC, Chapman, USD, Washington (UW), Tufts, Northeastern, LSU, Tulane, Notre Dame, IIT, Loyola (Chicago), GGU, John Marshall (Chicago), Miami, UF, Stetson, American (DC), John Hopkins, Howard, ASU, Samford. ISDE, EUI, IUCTurin, IMLI, SEEU, Riga, CEU, Maribor, Mannheim, American (Cairo), UNSW, FLS, Glasgow, Aberdeen, Dundee, Strathclyde, IIU (Malaysia), Macau, Ramkhamhaeng, Assumption, IIU (Islamabad), Khazar, BFSU, Peking, Jinan, Delhi, Osmania, Punjabi and NUJS.

If this helps anybody in their search for comparative/international law taught unis. No worries. However, any information or suggestions without using a ranking scale will be appreciated.

Kind regards.
Greetings curious reader,

I am seeking information from applicants whose undergoing or undergone a specialised LLM in comparative/international law. I am not here to justify rather what uni ought to be considered the best. However, suggesting, what programme offers the best quantitative, not qualitative, analysis upon comparative/international law. I have been doing my own research upon post-graduate programmes soliciting a LLM in comparative/international law such as:

Leiden, Vienna, Copenhagen, NUS, Kent, Columbia/NYU, Chicago/Northwestern, UIUC, Stanford, Canturbury, Oslo, IE, IHEID, Utrecht, City (HK), Lund, Edinburgh, Cambridge, Ghent, Sussex, UCT, Indiana (IU), Indiana (Bloomington) ANU/Sydney, Iowa, Bangor, Helsinki, Trinity, Essex, UCL, QMUL, Aberystwyth, LSE, Nottingham, Swansea, Leicester, Michigan, SOAS, NUI, Peace, UBA, Heidelberg, McGill, CUPL, Tehran, Turin,Tel Aviv, Penn, Temple, Texas, UHLC, St. Mary's, UCLA/USC, Chapman, USD, Washington (UW), Tufts, Northeastern, LSU, Tulane, Notre Dame, IIT, Loyola (Chicago), GGU, John Marshall (Chicago), Miami, UF, Stetson, American (DC), John Hopkins, Howard, ASU, Samford. ISDE, EUI, IUCTurin, IMLI, SEEU, Riga, CEU, Maribor, Mannheim, American (Cairo), UNSW, FLS, Glasgow, Aberdeen, Dundee, Strathclyde, IIU (Malaysia), Macau, Ramkhamhaeng, Assumption, IIU (Islamabad), Khazar, BFSU, Peking, Jinan, Delhi, Osmania, Punjabi and NUJS.

If this helps anybody in their search for comparative/international law taught unis. No worries. However, any information or suggestions without using a ranking scale will be appreciated.

Kind regards.
quote
924CC
Your post is indeed most interesting. I'll try to add something and to provide a tentative answer, but keep in mind my status is that of an average applicant.

I hold the belief that, even in a field such as int'l law, the brand might have its value. Quite frankly, I do not believe that going to Turin, Lund or Leiden to pursue an LLM would be the best choice, regardless of the amount of coursework related to international law I am not perfectly clear about what you mean by "quantitative analysis": you might also want to consider that I am not a native speaker in relying on this reply.

My dissertation supervisor once suggested that I kept in mind the value of a certain "brand" when electing to apply for an LLM program or another. It is not a matter of rankings as in "Yale leads in this year's US News ranking" but rather something different. Studying in a law school with a certain reputation always helps, while spending a year in Lund where I have no reason to doubt that you could probably and by all means focus on excellent research and take advantage of the scholarship of some great professors probably would not.

The aforementioned dissertation supervisor made this statement extremely clear acting as a referee for my applications, as he refused to write references for school that weren't of his liking. This might as well be too harsh a reaction, but it does portray an accurate rendition of what he believed a fruitful experience should be. And, since he is an extremely prominent international lawyer, I had no interest whatsoever in annoying him.

I am from mainland Europe and I am all for the UK. Cambridge has always been regarded as *the* place to go if you want to pursue the study of PIL, while UCL seems another great option.

In my opinion, what you should be doing is try to understand where do you want to go after graduate study in law. For example, I already hold a postgraduate degree and I could have gone straight into a PhD program in my own Country and theoretically in any other EU Country, but good luck with that... but I loathed the idea, needed a sea change and wish to get into a PhD program elsewhere afterwards. Anyways, I want to do research and could not care less about practicing law as an attorney.

What about you? Do you want to practice law in a firm (I doubt it if you are into PIL, but who knows)? Do you want to be admitted to the bar in the US? Do you want to try working for the UN? In most cases, what will serve you best will be going to a school with a reputation, which might be perceived in a different way from different prospective employers. In some cases, rankings reflect a school's reputation, but in most they won't.

I hope this helps a bit in your quest for the perfect LLM!
Your post is indeed most interesting. I'll try to add something and to provide a tentative answer, but keep in mind my status is that of an average applicant.

I hold the belief that, even in a field such as int'l law, the brand might have its value. Quite frankly, I do not believe that going to Turin, Lund or Leiden to pursue an LLM would be the best choice, regardless of the amount of coursework related to international law – I am not perfectly clear about what you mean by "quantitative analysis": you might also want to consider that I am not a native speaker in relying on this reply.

My dissertation supervisor once suggested that I kept in mind the value of a certain "brand" when electing to apply for an LLM program or another. It is not a matter of rankings – as in "Yale leads in this year's US News ranking" – but rather something different. Studying in a law school with a certain reputation always helps, while spending a year in Lund – where I have no reason to doubt that you could probably and by all means focus on excellent research and take advantage of the scholarship of some great professors – probably would not.

The aforementioned dissertation supervisor made this statement extremely clear acting as a referee for my applications, as he refused to write references for school that weren't of his liking. This might as well be too harsh a reaction, but it does portray an accurate rendition of what he believed a fruitful experience should be. And, since he is an extremely prominent international lawyer, I had no interest whatsoever in annoying him.

I am from mainland Europe and I am all for the UK. Cambridge has always been regarded as *the* place to go if you want to pursue the study of PIL, while UCL seems another great option.

In my opinion, what you should be doing is try to understand where do you want to go after graduate study in law. For example, I already hold a postgraduate degree and I could have gone straight into a PhD program in my own Country – and theoretically in any other EU Country, but good luck with that... – but I loathed the idea, needed a sea change and wish to get into a PhD program elsewhere afterwards. Anyways, I want to do research and could not care less about practicing law as an attorney.

What about you? Do you want to practice law in a firm (I doubt it if you are into PIL, but who knows)? Do you want to be admitted to the bar in the US? Do you want to try working for the UN? In most cases, what will serve you best will be going to a school with a reputation, which might be perceived in a different way from different prospective employers. In some cases, rankings reflect a school's reputation, but in most they won't.

I hope this helps a bit in your quest for the perfect LLM!
quote
Brainy Smu...
Your post is indeed most interesting. I'll try to add something and to provide a tentative answer, but keep in mind my status is that of an average applicant.

I hold the belief that, even in a field such as int'l law, the brand might have its value. Quite frankly, I do not believe that going to Turin, Lund or Leiden to pursue an LLM would be the best choice, regardless of the amount of coursework related to international law I am not perfectly clear about what you mean by "quantitative analysis": you might also want to consider that I am not a native speaker in relying on this reply.

My dissertation supervisor once suggested that I kept in mind the value of a certain "brand" when electing to apply for an LLM program or another. It is not a matter of rankings as in "Yale leads in this year's US News ranking" but rather something different. Studying in a law school with a certain reputation always helps, while spending a year in Lund where I have no reason to doubt that you could probably and by all means focus on excellent research and take advantage of the scholarship of some great professors probably would not.

The aforementioned dissertation supervisor made this statement extremely clear acting as a referee for my applications, as he refused to write references for school that weren't of his liking. This might as well be too harsh a reaction, but it does portray an accurate rendition of what he believed a fruitful experience should be. And, since he is an extremely prominent international lawyer, I had no interest whatsoever in annoying him.

I am from mainland Europe and I am all for the UK. Cambridge has always been regarded as *the* place to go if you want to pursue the study of PIL, while UCL seems another great option.

In my opinion, what you should be doing is try to understand where do you want to go after graduate study in law. For example, I already hold a postgraduate degree and I could have gone straight into a PhD program in my own Country and theoretically in any other EU Country, but good luck with that... but I loathed the idea, needed a sea change and wish to get into a PhD program elsewhere afterwards. Anyways, I want to do research and could not care less about practicing law as an attorney.

What about you? Do you want to practice law in a firm (I doubt it if you are into PIL, but who knows)? Do you want to be admitted to the bar in the US? Do you want to try working for the UN? In most cases, what will serve you best will be going to a school with a reputation, which might be perceived in a different way from different prospective employers. In some cases, rankings reflect a school's reputation, but in most they won't.

I hope this helps a bit in your quest for the perfect LLM!



I recollect to the subjective evidence concerning a brand. However, the brand holds no bearing upon substantive analysis being taught at uni. It can be believed that lecturers from prestigious unis have been conferred their degree from the same prestigious uni where the lecturers gives lectures. The uni where an applicant can be conferred their specialised LLM only carries a sentimental value. Thereby remains a subjective construct, of why, the brand name on top of the LLM remains applicable.

IL/PIL (International law/ Public international law) remains the entitled interest of the post. Nonetheless seeking a perfect fit concerning IL/PIL taught programmes that can be scrutinised. My stance on a ranking scale remains arbitrary. The prestigious unis lack sufficient evidence of being prestigious, therefore, subjectively, bestowing sentimental properties onto their programme. On the contrary, whatever uni an applicant applies to, the applicant will read the same IL statutes that are relatively taught at all unis with an IL programme.

What do I mean by quantitative? I seek the breadth of substance. Or, an expansive approach over a glorified approach. From what you stated, I should apply to either UCL or Cambridge in this light. I will keep them both noted.

Turning the page. IL/PIL is widely known as a broad [field] of study. Many practicing lawyers believe it lacks substance, but precedents, within the scope of law (i.e.. is IL, law?). Since globalisation is evident. (Keenly regarding the usage of this website) IL remains unavoidable and attractive.

Despite the EU undergoing an economic meltdown. EU unis, such as, Lund, Leiden and Turin will [remain] evident to IL scholars. The EU will continue to profit by fishing for applicants from abroad who caught onto the subjective variable called reputation. Because sometimes, it is best to market a unis' brand during the peek of an economic meltdown just to keep the brand afloat. International applicants will spend between 50-150% more than domestic applicants for relatively the same education they would have received in their own respective country.

However my plans are open.
<blockquote>Your post is indeed most interesting. I'll try to add something and to provide a tentative answer, but keep in mind my status is that of an average applicant.

I hold the belief that, even in a field such as int'l law, the brand might have its value. Quite frankly, I do not believe that going to Turin, Lund or Leiden to pursue an LLM would be the best choice, regardless of the amount of coursework related to international law – I am not perfectly clear about what you mean by "quantitative analysis": you might also want to consider that I am not a native speaker in relying on this reply.

My dissertation supervisor once suggested that I kept in mind the value of a certain "brand" when electing to apply for an LLM program or another. It is not a matter of rankings – as in "Yale leads in this year's US News ranking" – but rather something different. Studying in a law school with a certain reputation always helps, while spending a year in Lund – where I have no reason to doubt that you could probably and by all means focus on excellent research and take advantage of the scholarship of some great professors – probably would not.

The aforementioned dissertation supervisor made this statement extremely clear acting as a referee for my applications, as he refused to write references for school that weren't of his liking. This might as well be too harsh a reaction, but it does portray an accurate rendition of what he believed a fruitful experience should be. And, since he is an extremely prominent international lawyer, I had no interest whatsoever in annoying him.

I am from mainland Europe and I am all for the UK. Cambridge has always been regarded as *the* place to go if you want to pursue the study of PIL, while UCL seems another great option.

In my opinion, what you should be doing is try to understand where do you want to go after graduate study in law. For example, I already hold a postgraduate degree and I could have gone straight into a PhD program in my own Country – and theoretically in any other EU Country, but good luck with that... – but I loathed the idea, needed a sea change and wish to get into a PhD program elsewhere afterwards. Anyways, I want to do research and could not care less about practicing law as an attorney.

What about you? Do you want to practice law in a firm (I doubt it if you are into PIL, but who knows)? Do you want to be admitted to the bar in the US? Do you want to try working for the UN? In most cases, what will serve you best will be going to a school with a reputation, which might be perceived in a different way from different prospective employers. In some cases, rankings reflect a school's reputation, but in most they won't.

I hope this helps a bit in your quest for the perfect LLM!</blockquote>


I recollect to the subjective evidence concerning a brand. However, the brand holds no bearing upon substantive analysis being taught at uni. It can be believed that lecturers from prestigious unis have been conferred their degree from the same prestigious uni where the lecturers gives lectures. The uni where an applicant can be conferred their specialised LLM only carries a sentimental value. Thereby remains a subjective construct, of why, the brand name on top of the LLM remains applicable.

IL/PIL (International law/ Public international law) remains the entitled interest of the post. Nonetheless seeking a perfect fit concerning IL/PIL taught programmes that can be scrutinised. My stance on a ranking scale remains arbitrary. The prestigious unis lack sufficient evidence of being prestigious, therefore, subjectively, bestowing sentimental properties onto their programme. On the contrary, whatever uni an applicant applies to, the applicant will read the same IL statutes that are relatively taught at all unis with an IL programme.

What do I mean by quantitative? I seek the breadth of substance. Or, an expansive approach over a glorified approach. From what you stated, I should apply to either UCL or Cambridge in this light. I will keep them both noted.

Turning the page. IL/PIL is widely known as a broad [field] of study. Many practicing lawyers believe it lacks substance, but precedents, within the scope of law (i.e.. is IL, law?). Since globalisation is evident. (Keenly regarding the usage of this website) IL remains unavoidable and attractive.

Despite the EU undergoing an economic meltdown. EU unis, such as, Lund, Leiden and Turin will [remain] evident to IL scholars. The EU will continue to profit by fishing for applicants from abroad who caught onto the subjective variable called reputation. Because sometimes, it is best to market a unis' brand during the peek of an economic meltdown just to keep the brand afloat. International applicants will spend between 50-150% more than domestic applicants for relatively the same education they would have received in their own respective country.

However my plans are open.
quote
Brainy Smu...
Nothing.
Nothing.
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

Ghent, Belgium 76 Followers 50 Discussions
Leiden, Netherlands 528 Followers 456 Discussions
Copenhagen, Denmark 77 Followers 19 Discussions
Singapore 243 Followers 218 Discussions
Fukuoka, Japan 45 Followers 31 Discussions
New York City, New York 1243 Followers 976 Discussions
New York City, New York 1860 Followers 1528 Discussions
Chicago, Illinois 509 Followers 308 Discussions
Chicago, Illinois 433 Followers 486 Discussions
Champaign, Illinois 40 Followers 68 Discussions
Stanford, California 697 Followers 382 Discussions
Christchurch, New Zealand 14 Followers 4 Discussions
Oslo, Norway 184 Followers 85 Discussions
Full Profile
Madrid, Spain 84 Followers 30 Discussions
Utrecht, Netherlands 135 Followers 143 Discussions
Hong Kong, Hong Kong (PRC) 17 Followers 13 Discussions
Lund, Sweden 114 Followers 81 Discussions
Edinburgh, United Kingdom 366 Followers 462 Discussions
Oxford, United Kingdom 740 Followers 785 Discussions
Cambridge, United Kingdom 682 Followers 706 Discussions
Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium 11 Followers 5 Discussions
Rondebosch, South Africa 69 Followers 27 Discussions
Canberra, Australia 30 Followers 43 Discussions
Sydney, Australia 157 Followers 107 Discussions
Helsinki, Finland 68 Followers 23 Discussions
Dublin, Ireland 101 Followers 79 Discussions
Colchester, United Kingdom 100 Followers 182 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 522 Followers 866 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 816 Followers 810 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 653 Followers 873 Discussions
Nottingham, United Kingdom 108 Followers 271 Discussions
Leicester, United Kingdom 27 Followers 47 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 70 Followers 168 Discussions
San José, Costa Rica 26 Followers 6 Discussions
Buenos Aires, Argentina 3 Followers 1 Discussion
Santiago de Chile, Chile 27 Followers 9 Discussions
Shenzhen, China 21 Followers 23 Discussions
Tehran, Iran 5 Followers 1 Discussion
Turin, Italy 31 Followers 8 Discussions
Tel Aviv, Israel 13 Followers 2 Discussions

Hot Discussions