Why NOT to study in Holland


LMR
It is always wonderful to hear about such great experiences in the Netherlands. However, it would seem to me that dismissing all other experiences and critical notes regarding the self-proclaimed Dutch tolerance as irrelevant just in order to fanatically defend the Dutch lacks respect.
Then again, I'm not sure that my very humbles remarks are legitimate and follow the required procedure of "stating the law, describing the law and applying the law".


I've just noticed that you have described my words as "fanatical". Not only do I find this utterly reprehensible, as a lawyer, you should know better than to apply fictitious insults to people who disagree with you, since you should have some knowledge of the concept of evidence.

I posted because, as a female, there are many countries in the world where female students will experience a much less happy student experience than in The Netherlands, and because my shared experiences might be helpful to them. It is not a country where, as a woman, you are harassed a lot, when compared to other countries.

Whether or not you personally have suffered disappointments in various areas of life does not weaken the importance of the experiences of others, nor entitle you to describe them as fanatical.

In response to the OP's issue regarding overseas students being required to pay more for university accommodation, I thought it was made obvious in the initial correspondence that it is because overseas students' utility bills are included in the price, for obvious reasons with regards to temporary residents. It is also a very standard practice in the UK with private landlords in similar scenarios.

If you think that the UK will provide a more tolerant university environment to students who dismiss others' views in such an offensive manner, then you are deluded. Neither does the UK provide Masters degrees to students for simply turning up a few times - UK universities, similar to prestigious Dutch universities, generally fail students of any nationality who simply don't produce a high enough standard of work to warrant a pass. I mark Masters papers in the UK as part of my job as an academic, and it is sometimes surprising to read what is presented, particularly when you have hundreds of other papers providing the standard required with which to compare it. To summarise, some students simply need to put in more effort and study more in order to produce a higher standard of work. There is little point in producing lawyers who do not have the skill to work on their own initiative or who do not have the ability to learn and to adapt to the legal environment in question, for reasons of future employability.
<blockquote>It is always wonderful to hear about such great experiences in the Netherlands. However, it would seem to me that dismissing all other experiences and critical notes regarding the self-proclaimed Dutch tolerance as irrelevant just in order to fanatically defend the Dutch lacks respect.
Then again, I'm not sure that my very humbles remarks are legitimate and follow the required procedure of "stating the law, describing the law and applying the law". </blockquote>

I've just noticed that you have described my words as "fanatical". Not only do I find this utterly reprehensible, as a lawyer, you should know better than to apply fictitious insults to people who disagree with you, since you should have some knowledge of the concept of evidence.

I posted because, as a female, there are many countries in the world where female students will experience a much less happy student experience than in The Netherlands, and because my shared experiences might be helpful to them. It is not a country where, as a woman, you are harassed a lot, when compared to other countries.

Whether or not you personally have suffered disappointments in various areas of life does not weaken the importance of the experiences of others, nor entitle you to describe them as fanatical.

In response to the OP's issue regarding overseas students being required to pay more for university accommodation, I thought it was made obvious in the initial correspondence that it is because overseas students' utility bills are included in the price, for obvious reasons with regards to temporary residents. It is also a very standard practice in the UK with private landlords in similar scenarios.

If you think that the UK will provide a more tolerant university environment to students who dismiss others' views in such an offensive manner, then you are deluded. Neither does the UK provide Masters degrees to students for simply turning up a few times - UK universities, similar to prestigious Dutch universities, generally fail students of any nationality who simply don't produce a high enough standard of work to warrant a pass. I mark Masters papers in the UK as part of my job as an academic, and it is sometimes surprising to read what is presented, particularly when you have hundreds of other papers providing the standard required with which to compare it. To summarise, some students simply need to put in more effort and study more in order to produce a higher standard of work. There is little point in producing lawyers who do not have the skill to work on their own initiative or who do not have the ability to learn and to adapt to the legal environment in question, for reasons of future employability.
I >

That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...

well it is a small town, no big deal. and there is Efteling, theme park that people come to visit, from all ovee the world. Breda is near by and it's beautiful, Eindhoven is also close and from there you can get good deals if you want to travel, low cost airplane ticket, wizzair is flying from there..Amsterdam is also not far away , i mean everything in the netherlands is just an hour or two by train..


Cool, thanks for letting me know.
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>I >

That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...</blockquote>
well it is a small town, no big deal. and there is Efteling, theme park that people come to visit, from all ovee the world. Breda is near by and it's beautiful, Eindhoven is also close and from there you can get good deals if you want to travel, low cost airplane ticket, wizzair is flying from there..Amsterdam is also not far away , i mean everything in the netherlands is just an hour or two by train..</blockquote>

Cool, thanks for letting me know.

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