Why NOT to study in Holland


chopedsuey
If they had a choice, Groningen people native to that region would love to kill you, eat you up and use your skin as a coat - l am NOT kidding they are just awful.

You are not welcome, you can't fit in, you are, alien to them. Its like living on an island and everybody has this weird island mentality.

Having gone to Israel many times, l would say that if you go to orthodox areas, in Jerusalem - these people are the same, they have the same weird mentality and are just not nice, if you live there, be ready for racism every day.
If they had a choice, Groningen people native to that region would love to kill you, eat you up and use your skin as a coat - l am NOT kidding they are just awful.

You are not welcome, you can't fit in, you are, alien to them. Its like living on an island and everybody has this weird island mentality.

Having gone to Israel many times, l would say that if you go to orthodox areas, in Jerusalem - these people are the same, they have the same weird mentality and are just not nice, if you live there, be ready for racism every day.
chopedsuey
Groningen, is not a town to go to. Avoid the town, if you can live in a caravan, in a caravan park outside the city, l recommend going to school - but that town is just unwelcome.

I know from a lot of Dutch friends whom are still in school (some are progressing to LLM degrees now), that in 2007 after l left, that some Groninger kids decided to park a car underneath the international student flat and set it alight, causing smoke damage, all the 300 international students were evacuated and had no place to go, until like 4 months later - so my advise, don't live in that town. They are evil.
Groningen, is not a town to go to. Avoid the town, if you can live in a caravan, in a caravan park outside the city, l recommend going to school - but that town is just unwelcome.

I know from a lot of Dutch friends whom are still in school (some are progressing to LLM degrees now), that in 2007 after l left, that some Groninger kids decided to park a car underneath the international student flat and set it alight, causing smoke damage, all the 300 international students were evacuated and had no place to go, until like 4 months later - so my advise, don't live in that town. They are evil.
frank2014
OMG this posts ruin all my impression of NL and my dreams about LAW programs of NL. What should I do Now, go to UK? Who can save me.......
OMG this posts ruin all my impression of NL and my dreams about LAW programs of NL. What should I do Now, go to UK? Who can save me.......
Adam89
As always it depends on who you are. If you're caucasian, then you will probably enjoy Holland because they will welcome you and the quality of university is quite good. But if you're, let's say, brown and, worse, Muslim, you might feel "uncomfortable" after a while. They have quite "unsettling" traditions for a country which praises itself as being "developped": http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/jakewallissimons/100192915/the-racist-outrage-of-christmas-in-holland/
As always it depends on who you are. If you're caucasian, then you will probably enjoy Holland because they will welcome you and the quality of university is quite good. But if you're, let's say, brown and, worse, Muslim, you might feel "uncomfortable" after a while. They have quite "unsettling" traditions for a country which praises itself as being "developped": http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/jakewallissimons/100192915/the-racist-outrage-of-christmas-in-holland/
Sami_81
It's interesting, I've been reading through this post and am sort of baffled by peoples' experiences in the Netherlands. As an American Muslim who once did an undergraduate exchange program in Utrecht - I really enjoyed the country (which is one of the reasons I'm considering an LLM there now!)

Some posters here are right in some ways - there is xenophobia in some parts of the country, and even in the politics. I remember I once had a heated discussion with a Dutch man in a cafe who was convinced that since Poland had joined the EU, millions of Poles were going to flood the country and take everybody's job. (turns out that didn't happen, but the fact that our conversation took place over beer on a Tuesday morning made me think that his job was at risk anyway.)

But I digress. This conversation made me upset at the time, but since graduating I've been to other places in Europe where there is a substantive, overt form of xenophobia (I work in an international NGO) and must say that having a debate with an upset drunk Dutch man while living in Utrecht for that time pales in comparison to other things I've seen. Whether you believe it or not, there's going to be xenophobia everywhere you go (even in the UK, as some posters have suggested as a good alternative to studying in the Netherlands.)

While in the Netherlands, I traveled throughout the country and was always treated with the upmost respect - despite my brown skin and looks that are most certainly not Dutch-like. I never felt unwelcome in a shop or a cafe, as another poster has suggested. Never felt physically threatened, etc. I did hear things that affected me because they were xenophobic, but honestly, I've heard the same or worse in the US. At some point you just have to not let it affect you.

Having lived outside of my home country for much of my adult life, including places that are actually openly hostile to people from abroad, I've found that if you obey a couple of core rules you'll generally be fine:

- If you live outside of a city center, you probably want to start learning the language. English will be fine for school in the Netherlands, especially since you're probably socializing with students, but going outside of city centers, my experience is that people are actually more sensitive to the fact that you don't speak the language than the color of your skin.

- Be humble: You're not in your home country. Maybe you don't know the cultural rules and expectations. You have to be accepting of new things and other beliefs, even though they might not make sense to you. It sucks that some people are xenophobic, but there's no sense in confronting that, because it's not going to get you anywhere. Don't argue with people and just walk away.

- And for Pete's sake visit the country if you are considering going to school there! You'll get a better understanding of the Netherlands if you go there than reading these discussion forums. :)
It's interesting, I've been reading through this post and am sort of baffled by peoples' experiences in the Netherlands. As an American Muslim who once did an undergraduate exchange program in Utrecht - I really enjoyed the country (which is one of the reasons I'm considering an LLM there now!)

Some posters here are right in some ways - there is xenophobia in some parts of the country, and even in the politics. I remember I once had a heated discussion with a Dutch man in a cafe who was convinced that since Poland had joined the EU, millions of Poles were going to flood the country and take everybody's job. (turns out that didn't happen, but the fact that our conversation took place over beer on a Tuesday morning made me think that his job was at risk anyway.)

But I digress. This conversation made me upset at the time, but since graduating I've been to other places in Europe where there is a substantive, overt form of xenophobia (I work in an international NGO) and must say that having a debate with an upset drunk Dutch man while living in Utrecht for that time pales in comparison to other things I've seen. Whether you believe it or not, there's going to be xenophobia everywhere you go (even in the UK, as some posters have suggested as a good alternative to studying in the Netherlands.)

While in the Netherlands, I traveled throughout the country and was always treated with the upmost respect - despite my brown skin and looks that are most certainly not Dutch-like. I never felt unwelcome in a shop or a cafe, as another poster has suggested. Never felt physically threatened, etc. I did hear things that affected me because they were xenophobic, but honestly, I've heard the same or worse in the US. At some point you just have to not let it affect you.

Having lived outside of my home country for much of my adult life, including places that are actually openly hostile to people from abroad, I've found that if you obey a couple of core rules you'll generally be fine:

- If you live outside of a city center, you probably want to start learning the language. English will be fine for school in the Netherlands, especially since you're probably socializing with students, but going outside of city centers, my experience is that people are actually more sensitive to the fact that you don't speak the language than the color of your skin.

- Be humble: You're not in your home country. Maybe you don't know the cultural rules and expectations. You have to be accepting of new things and other beliefs, even though they might not make sense to you. It sucks that some people are xenophobic, but there's no sense in confronting that, because it's not going to get you anywhere. Don't argue with people and just walk away.

- And for Pete's sake visit the country if you are considering going to school there! You'll get a better understanding of the Netherlands if you go there than reading these discussion forums. :)
I am very disappointed by the attitude in general of the Dutch people. First of all, the Dutch students are always privileged. The grades of the international students are always cut whereas the Dutch students receive the highest grades.
Further, you can immediately feel the difference in the attitude, if you come from, for instance, Africa, or a country in Eastern Europe, or other developing region.
I am deeply sorry that I chose the Netherlands for studying, although I have been a quite successful student here. It was a huge mistake. That is because the Netherlands is quite an unfriendly country, even though students actually come to study here, and not to "steal jobs", or "work for less money than the Dutch do", as most Dutch people think and say.
Also, the agency of the university where I studied, takes much higher rent prices from international students, in comparison with what Dutch students pay for it which is an obvious form of discrimination.
Dutch people, who originally come from other countries, such as Morocco, are looked at in a different way, I have heard plenty of them complaining they are treated on a discriminatory basis and it is hard for them to get decent jobs.That`s it.
Please, do not invest your money for studying in a country like that-it`s not worth it!
It was quite a disappointment, that is why I would not advise foreign students to come in a country like that.


I have been studying in the Netherlands for a year, and I liked it there very much. The people are kind and friendly, the university (Tilburg University) is modern and very nice...I can't imagine someone saying about Dutch people not being friendly..try and compare them to the French, and you will see the difference (they are not even comparable).. Whoever has an opportunity to go study in the Netherlands I would strongly encouraged them to do so!
<blockquote>I am very disappointed by the attitude in general of the Dutch people. First of all, the Dutch students are always privileged. The grades of the international students are always cut whereas the Dutch students receive the highest grades.
Further, you can immediately feel the difference in the attitude, if you come from, for instance, Africa, or a country in Eastern Europe, or other developing region.
I am deeply sorry that I chose the Netherlands for studying, although I have been a quite successful student here. It was a huge mistake. That is because the Netherlands is quite an unfriendly country, even though students actually come to study here, and not to "steal jobs", or "work for less money than the Dutch do", as most Dutch people think and say.
Also, the agency of the university where I studied, takes much higher rent prices from international students, in comparison with what Dutch students pay for it which is an obvious form of discrimination.
Dutch people, who originally come from other countries, such as Morocco, are looked at in a different way, I have heard plenty of them complaining they are treated on a discriminatory basis and it is hard for them to get decent jobs.That`s it.
Please, do not invest your money for studying in a country like that-it`s not worth it!
It was quite a disappointment, that is why I would not advise foreign students to come in a country like that.
</blockquote>

I have been studying in the Netherlands for a year, and I liked it there very much. The people are kind and friendly, the university (Tilburg University) is modern and very nice...I can't imagine someone saying about Dutch people not being friendly..try and compare them to the French, and you will see the difference (they are not even comparable).. Whoever has an opportunity to go study in the Netherlands I would strongly encouraged them to do so!
LMR
I honestly am horrified that this comes up first when I search for "LLM in Holland". I've studied twice there, as part of the Erasmus undergraduate programme in Leiden, and at Utrecht. Obviously there are cultural differences to my home country - that was part of the appeal of studying abroad!

I cannot understand people saying the Dutch are unfriendly. One of the reasons I went there is because I made a childhood friend with a Dutch girl I met on holiday and then our families became friends and met up over the years. She is one of my longest standing friends. Likewise I have another good friend who happened to be Dutch that I met through my sport. Not to mention all the Dutch friends I made when studying there - and Dutch men ask you out on proper dates and behave well!

I don't "look Dutch" at all - I am small and dark. I would say there are some aspects of Dutch culture that annoy me, but not many, and that is to be expected when you are away from home. What I do love is that as a lone female, you are expected NOT to be hassled. I have to say the only times I was hassled in Holland was by non-Dutch. I honestly found the Dutch very tolerant in terms of what they put up with, and as a foreigner who wouldn't be accused of racism, I was less prepared to put up with it. One incident sticks in my mind - I was waiting at the Housing Office and there was only me and then another man (who was not Dutch) came in and sat opposite me. He sat with his legs wide apart and his hand resting on his genitals. I put up with it for a while then I thought "You know, I have had enough of this, this is very rude, I am going to say something". So I did, in Dutch. He then claimed he didn't understand and asked me to "speak English". Which I did. He then claimed he didn't know what I was talking about. Right. And I'm sure I'm not the only woman in Holland who finds those little whispered comments that seem to follow you around really offensive when you are out shopping or parking your bike or whatever - always from racial minorities.

I always tried to fit in when I was in the Netherlands and be quite Dutch. They are very tolerant so its not difficult. I cannot think of many countries where I would get so many invitations to join the natives socially - I was invited along to Minerva nights out in Leiden (me and an Italian friend once tried to hide in a cupboard in a room we heard a Augustinas initiation ceremony was being held, but they sussed us out), many nights out, balls, trips away, etc.. I made sure I did sports and joined societies and clubs. I do wonder what my experiences would have been in the home countries of those criticising the Dutch...

As for the marks - well we were getting an additional percentage added onto our marks because in Leiden because English was our second language. We were Scottish! So after the first assessment, they changed that policy for us but didn't take away our extra marks - their mistake!

I have to say that judging from some of the grammar and argument construction above, the writers are always going to struggle to get higher marks in law. The level of argument and discussion just doesn't seem to be there. I would suggest that has more to do with disappointing marks than any issue of nationality. At Master level study of Law, the basic format of stating the legal issue, describing the law and then applying the law should already be well established, as should the lack of need for spoon-feeding and blaming others for your inability to obtain high marks.
I honestly am horrified that this comes up first when I search for "LLM in Holland". I've studied twice there, as part of the Erasmus undergraduate programme in Leiden, and at Utrecht. Obviously there are cultural differences to my home country - that was part of the appeal of studying abroad!

I cannot understand people saying the Dutch are unfriendly. One of the reasons I went there is because I made a childhood friend with a Dutch girl I met on holiday and then our families became friends and met up over the years. She is one of my longest standing friends. Likewise I have another good friend who happened to be Dutch that I met through my sport. Not to mention all the Dutch friends I made when studying there - and Dutch men ask you out on proper dates and behave well!

I don't "look Dutch" at all - I am small and dark. I would say there are some aspects of Dutch culture that annoy me, but not many, and that is to be expected when you are away from home. What I do love is that as a lone female, you are expected NOT to be hassled. I have to say the only times I was hassled in Holland was by non-Dutch. I honestly found the Dutch very tolerant in terms of what they put up with, and as a foreigner who wouldn't be accused of racism, I was less prepared to put up with it. One incident sticks in my mind - I was waiting at the Housing Office and there was only me and then another man (who was not Dutch) came in and sat opposite me. He sat with his legs wide apart and his hand resting on his genitals. I put up with it for a while then I thought "You know, I have had enough of this, this is very rude, I am going to say something". So I did, in Dutch. He then claimed he didn't understand and asked me to "speak English". Which I did. He then claimed he didn't know what I was talking about. Right. And I'm sure I'm not the only woman in Holland who finds those little whispered comments that seem to follow you around really offensive when you are out shopping or parking your bike or whatever - always from racial minorities.

I always tried to fit in when I was in the Netherlands and be quite Dutch. They are very tolerant so its not difficult. I cannot think of many countries where I would get so many invitations to join the natives socially - I was invited along to Minerva nights out in Leiden (me and an Italian friend once tried to hide in a cupboard in a room we heard a Augustinas initiation ceremony was being held, but they sussed us out), many nights out, balls, trips away, etc.. I made sure I did sports and joined societies and clubs. I do wonder what my experiences would have been in the home countries of those criticising the Dutch...

As for the marks - well we were getting an additional percentage added onto our marks because in Leiden because English was our second language. We were Scottish! So after the first assessment, they changed that policy for us but didn't take away our extra marks - their mistake!

I have to say that judging from some of the grammar and argument construction above, the writers are always going to struggle to get higher marks in law. The level of argument and discussion just doesn't seem to be there. I would suggest that has more to do with disappointing marks than any issue of nationality. At Master level study of Law, the basic format of stating the legal issue, describing the law and then applying the law should already be well established, as should the lack of need for spoon-feeding and blaming others for your inability to obtain high marks.
Adam89
It is always wonderful to hear about such great experiences in the Netherlands. However, it would seem to me that dismissing all other experiences and critical notes regarding the self-proclaimed Dutch tolerance as irrelevant just in order to fanatically defend the Dutch lacks respect.
Then again, I'm not sure that my very humbles remarks are legitimate and follow the required procedure of "stating the law, describing the law and applying the law".
Oh and, not only am I Dutch (so I have seen and heard more than an occasional visitor) and I graduated suma cum laude for all my degree......
It is always wonderful to hear about such great experiences in the Netherlands. However, it would seem to me that dismissing all other experiences and critical notes regarding the self-proclaimed Dutch tolerance as irrelevant just in order to fanatically defend the Dutch lacks respect.
Then again, I'm not sure that my very humbles remarks are legitimate and follow the required procedure of "stating the law, describing the law and applying the law".
Oh and, not only am I Dutch (so I have seen and heard more than an occasional visitor) and I graduated suma cum laude for all my degree......
linny
I am now facing in a dilemma on whether to do my LLM in UK or Leiden. I am an Asian and the threads of all the fellow mates here did give me a grave concern. Has the situation improved? And also, Leiden has a great QS ranking....
I am now facing in a dilemma on whether to do my LLM in UK or Leiden. I am an Asian and the threads of all the fellow mates here did give me a grave concern. Has the situation improved? And also, Leiden has a great QS ranking....
Adam89
I am now facing in a dilemma on whether to do my LLM in UK or Leiden. I am an Asian and the threads of all the fellow mates here did give me a grave concern. Has the situation improved? And also, Leiden has a great QS ranking....


Leiden's ranking is good. I don't know which UK university you intended to go to initially but I would argue that generally speaking UK universities are the best in Europe and better known/valued worldwide. Obviously, you also have to take into account the differences in fees. So, again, it depends....
<blockquote>I am now facing in a dilemma on whether to do my LLM in UK or Leiden. I am an Asian and the threads of all the fellow mates here did give me a grave concern. Has the situation improved? And also, Leiden has a great QS ranking.... </blockquote>

Leiden's ranking is good. I don't know which UK university you intended to go to initially but I would argue that generally speaking UK universities are the best in Europe and better known/valued worldwide. Obviously, you also have to take into account the differences in fees. So, again, it depends....
linny
I am now facing in a dilemma on whether to do my LLM in UK or Leiden. I am an Asian and the threads of all the fellow mates here did give me a grave concern. Has the situation improved? And also, Leiden has a great QS ranking....


Leiden's ranking is good. I don't know which UK university you intended to go to initially but I would argue that generally speaking UK universities are the best in Europe and better known/valued worldwide. Obviously, you also have to take into account the differences in fees. So, again, it depends....



Dear Adam89,

Thank you very much for your prompt reply. Put financial implications aside (assumed that I am sponsored, between Birmingham and Leiden, which is more prestige? And more comfortable for an Asian (who does not speak dutch)?
<blockquote><blockquote>I am now facing in a dilemma on whether to do my LLM in UK or Leiden. I am an Asian and the threads of all the fellow mates here did give me a grave concern. Has the situation improved? And also, Leiden has a great QS ranking.... </blockquote>

Leiden's ranking is good. I don't know which UK university you intended to go to initially but I would argue that generally speaking UK universities are the best in Europe and better known/valued worldwide. Obviously, you also have to take into account the differences in fees. So, again, it depends....</blockquote>


Dear Adam89,

Thank you very much for your prompt reply. Put financial implications aside (assumed that I am sponsored, between Birmingham and Leiden, which is more prestige? And more comfortable for an Asian (who does not speak dutch)?
Wheretogo_
Birmingham is a solid and very respect law school in the UK. While Leiden is also good I think you would benefit more from a UK law school experience together with studying some English law subjects.
Birmingham is a solid and very respect law school in the UK. While Leiden is also good I think you would benefit more from a UK law school experience together with studying some English law subjects.
linny
Birmingham is a solid and very respect law school in the UK. While Leiden is also good I think you would benefit more from a UK law school experience together with studying some English law subjects.


Thank you very much! I come from a south east asia country which is a commonwealth state. Whilst studying in UK is the most common option for the local people here, my view is previously swayed as Netherlands (The Hague) seems to offer great opportunities of landing a job in international organisations (though I have also heard about how tough it is to get enrolled etc). It also has a great reputation in European law subjects.

I guess i have pretty much decided to opt for Birmingham, hopefully with no regret...
<blockquote>Birmingham is a solid and very respect law school in the UK. While Leiden is also good I think you would benefit more from a UK law school experience together with studying some English law subjects.</blockquote>

Thank you very much! I come from a south east asia country which is a commonwealth state. Whilst studying in UK is the most common option for the local people here, my view is previously swayed as Netherlands (The Hague) seems to offer great opportunities of landing a job in international organisations (though I have also heard about how tough it is to get enrolled etc). It also has a great reputation in European law subjects.

I guess i have pretty much decided to opt for Birmingham, hopefully with no regret...
I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!
I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!
Adam89
I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!


As always and everywhere it depends on your individual case, that is on who you are and where you come from. The Netherlands is no exception, despite its self-promotion. Also, if you are only passing by for a few months you may not be aware at all of the socio-political context. For the rest, the university where you end up plays a very important and distinctive role.
<blockquote>I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!</blockquote>

As always and everywhere it depends on your individual case, that is on who you are and where you come from. The Netherlands is no exception, despite its self-promotion. Also, if you are only passing by for a few months you may not be aware at all of the socio-political context. For the rest, the university where you end up plays a very important and distinctive role.
I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!

My time in Tilburg was the best time I ever had as a student. Someone asked about activities - there are bunch of activities and it's really an ideal place for international students. They have groups on facebook for every program, erasmus mundus exchange students and everything, and every two or three weeks there is some kind of social event. everyone is kind and helpful, library is working until 24:00..the weather there is a drawback but it is roughly the same all over the Netherlands. Sunny days are extraordinarily rare, and if you get some sun there, make a good use of it! Sun is the only thing that I really missed there (except fo my boyfriend :D ). Long story short, I don't think you can be really disappointed in Tilburg especially if you are from outside Europe (Iam from Europe and I liked it VERY much!)
<blockquote>I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!</blockquote>
My time in Tilburg was the best time I ever had as a student. Someone asked about activities - there are bunch of activities and it's really an ideal place for international students. They have groups on facebook for every program, erasmus mundus exchange students and everything, and every two or three weeks there is some kind of social event. everyone is kind and helpful, library is working until 24:00..the weather there is a drawback but it is roughly the same all over the Netherlands. Sunny days are extraordinarily rare, and if you get some sun there, make a good use of it! Sun is the only thing that I really missed there (except fo my boyfriend :D ). Long story short, I don't think you can be really disappointed in Tilburg especially if you are from outside Europe (Iam from Europe and I liked it VERY much!)
I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!

My time in Tilburg was the best time I ever had as a student. Someone asked about activities - there are bunch of activities and it's really an ideal place for international students. They have groups on facebook for every program, erasmus mundus exchange students and everything, and every two or three weeks there is some kind of social event. everyone is kind and helpful, library is working until 24:00..the weather there is a drawback but it is roughly the same all over the Netherlands. Sunny days are extraordinarily rare, and if you get some sun there, make a good use of it! Sun is the only thing that I really missed there (except fo my boyfriend :D ). Long story short, I don't think you can be really disappointed in Tilburg especially if you are from outside Europe (Iam from Europe and I liked it VERY much!)


That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...
<blockquote><blockquote>I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!</blockquote>
My time in Tilburg was the best time I ever had as a student. Someone asked about activities - there are bunch of activities and it's really an ideal place for international students. They have groups on facebook for every program, erasmus mundus exchange students and everything, and every two or three weeks there is some kind of social event. everyone is kind and helpful, library is working until 24:00..the weather there is a drawback but it is roughly the same all over the Netherlands. Sunny days are extraordinarily rare, and if you get some sun there, make a good use of it! Sun is the only thing that I really missed there (except fo my boyfriend :D ). Long story short, I don't think you can be really disappointed in Tilburg especially if you are from outside Europe (Iam from Europe and I liked it VERY much!)</blockquote>

That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...
Adam89
I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!

My time in Tilburg was the best time I ever had as a student. Someone asked about activities - there are bunch of activities and it's really an ideal place for international students. They have groups on facebook for every program, erasmus mundus exchange students and everything, and every two or three weeks there is some kind of social event. everyone is kind and helpful, library is working until 24:00..the weather there is a drawback but it is roughly the same all over the Netherlands. Sunny days are extraordinarily rare, and if you get some sun there, make a good use of it! Sun is the only thing that I really missed there (except fo my boyfriend :D ). Long story short, I don't think you can be really disappointed in Tilburg especially if you are from outside Europe (Iam from Europe and I liked it VERY much!)


That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...


I would never recommend someone to study in Tilburg, especially not law...... If you want to study law in the Netherlands then the best options (both from a national and an international perspectives) are: Leiden, Amsterdam, Utrecht, Groningen, Maastricht, Rotterdam
Oh and yes, Tilburg is really not worth seeing as a city....
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!</blockquote>
My time in Tilburg was the best time I ever had as a student. Someone asked about activities - there are bunch of activities and it's really an ideal place for international students. They have groups on facebook for every program, erasmus mundus exchange students and everything, and every two or three weeks there is some kind of social event. everyone is kind and helpful, library is working until 24:00..the weather there is a drawback but it is roughly the same all over the Netherlands. Sunny days are extraordinarily rare, and if you get some sun there, make a good use of it! Sun is the only thing that I really missed there (except fo my boyfriend :D ). Long story short, I don't think you can be really disappointed in Tilburg especially if you are from outside Europe (Iam from Europe and I liked it VERY much!)</blockquote>

That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...</blockquote>

I would never recommend someone to study in Tilburg, especially not law...... If you want to study law in the Netherlands then the best options (both from a national and an international perspectives) are: Leiden, Amsterdam, Utrecht, Groningen, Maastricht, Rotterdam
Oh and yes, Tilburg is really not worth seeing as a city....
I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!

My time in Tilburg was the best time I ever had as a student. Someone asked about activities - there are bunch of activities and it's really an ideal place for international students. They have groups on facebook for every program, erasmus mundus exchange students and everything, and every two or three weeks there is some kind of social event. everyone is kind and helpful, library is working until 24:00..the weather there is a drawback but it is roughly the same all over the Netherlands. Sunny days are extraordinarily rare, and if you get some sun there, make a good use of it! Sun is the only thing that I really missed there (except fo my boyfriend :D ). Long story short, I don't think you can be really disappointed in Tilburg especially if you are from outside Europe (Iam from Europe and I liked it VERY much!)


That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...


I would never recommend someone to study in Tilburg, especially not law...... If you want to study law in the Netherlands then the best options (both from a national and an international perspectives) are: Leiden, Amsterdam, Utrecht, Groningen, Maastricht, Rotterdam
Oh and yes, Tilburg is really not worth seeing as a city....


That's odd, I have heard very good things about it and very bad things about Utrecht and Rotterdam...
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>I have applied to study at Maastricht and Tilburg, but having read this am not sure I want to go even if I do get in, is it really that bad?!</blockquote>
My time in Tilburg was the best time I ever had as a student. Someone asked about activities - there are bunch of activities and it's really an ideal place for international students. They have groups on facebook for every program, erasmus mundus exchange students and everything, and every two or three weeks there is some kind of social event. everyone is kind and helpful, library is working until 24:00..the weather there is a drawback but it is roughly the same all over the Netherlands. Sunny days are extraordinarily rare, and if you get some sun there, make a good use of it! Sun is the only thing that I really missed there (except fo my boyfriend :D ). Long story short, I don't think you can be really disappointed in Tilburg especially if you are from outside Europe (Iam from Europe and I liked it VERY much!)</blockquote>

That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...</blockquote>

I would never recommend someone to study in Tilburg, especially not law...... If you want to study law in the Netherlands then the best options (both from a national and an international perspectives) are: Leiden, Amsterdam, Utrecht, Groningen, Maastricht, Rotterdam
Oh and yes, Tilburg is really not worth seeing as a city....</blockquote>

That's odd, I have heard very good things about it and very bad things about Utrecht and Rotterdam...
I >

That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...

well it is a small town, no big deal. and there is Efteling, theme park that people come to visit, from all ovee the world. Breda is near by and it's beautiful, Eindhoven is also close and from there you can get good deals if you want to travel, low cost airplane ticket, wizzair is flying from there..Amsterdam is also not far away , i mean everything in the netherlands is just an hour or two by train..
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>I >

That's great, what's the city like though? I heard it was the ugliest in the netherlands...</blockquote>
well it is a small town, no big deal. and there is Efteling, theme park that people come to visit, from all ovee the world. Breda is near by and it's beautiful, Eindhoven is also close and from there you can get good deals if you want to travel, low cost airplane ticket, wizzair is flying from there..Amsterdam is also not far away , i mean everything in the netherlands is just an hour or two by train..

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