UW Tax LLM


Does anyone know anything about the requirements for admission. Obviously there are no mandatory cut-offs? But let's talk minimums. I'm possibly in the lower half of my schools class. I don't want to be outed on this board so I'll just say my school is ranked 20-ish.

As has been mentioned, good work in tax courses helps. I haven't taken tax yet but I took a tax course in undergrad. But really, I don't think there's any reason to believe I would do any better in a tax course than my others courses.
Does anyone know anything about the requirements for admission. Obviously there are no mandatory cut-offs? But let's talk minimums. I'm possibly in the lower half of my schools class. I don't want to be outed on this board so I'll just say my school is ranked 20-ish.

As has been mentioned, good work in tax courses helps. I haven't taken tax yet but I took a tax course in undergrad. But really, I don't think there's any reason to believe I would do any better in a tax course than my others courses.
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OoiRingo
You should know why you want the LLM before you spend the time, effort, and money to get it. You will be much better off if you practice law first to find out what you want to do with your career instead of just racking up degrees.
You should know why you want the LLM before you spend the time, effort, and money to get it. You will be much better off if you practice law first to find out what you want to do with your career instead of just racking up degrees.
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Peasefrog
Any word back from anyone who has applied to UW for Tax? My application materials were received in mid-Feb...

sigh...waiting is the worst!

I guess I'm impatient. I'm waiting on other apps, but this one's what I'm stewing about. ;-)
Any word back from anyone who has applied to UW for Tax? My application materials were received in mid-Feb...

sigh...waiting is the worst!

I guess I'm impatient. I'm waiting on other apps, but this one's what I'm stewing about. ;-)
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bdc
Peasefrog,

What are your stats? Are you international or domestic?
Peasefrog,

What are your stats? Are you international or domestic?
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Peasefrog
Hi bdc...

I went to a top tier school (on the lower end), graduated top 15%, took 15 hours of tax classes as a jd. Oh yeah! Domestic.

I've heard back from USD, which is awesome, but still waiting on UW...and waiting to hear about scholarships to finance this beast!

How bout you? On the other thread you'd said you applied to Miami and UW...anywhere else? I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you! (and me! ;-) )
Hi bdc...

I went to a top tier school (on the lower end), graduated top 15%, took 15 hours of tax classes as a jd. Oh yeah! Domestic.

I've heard back from USD, which is awesome, but still waiting on UW...and waiting to hear about scholarships to finance this beast!

How bout you? On the other thread you'd said you applied to Miami and UW...anywhere else? I'm keeping my fingers crossed for you! (and me! ;-) )
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bdc
Hey Peasefrog,

I applied to UW, USD and Miami- estate planning

my stats are not stellar to say the least. Tier two middle of the road but have a certificate in estate planning. I am from the seattle area so maybe that will help. I have a friend in the EP program at miami and she has worse stats than me so fingers crossed.

Congrats on USD- I live in southern california right now and its a great program for down here for sure. I am domestic as well.

Good luck, maybe some good news soon. You are in at one so all is good...the first one is the hardest.
Hey Peasefrog,

I applied to UW, USD and Miami- estate planning

my stats are not stellar to say the least. Tier two middle of the road but have a certificate in estate planning. I am from the seattle area so maybe that will help. I have a friend in the EP program at miami and she has worse stats than me so fingers crossed.

Congrats on USD- I live in southern california right now and its a great program for down here for sure. I am domestic as well.

Good luck, maybe some good news soon. You are in at one so all is good...the first one is the hardest.
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Peasefrog
Ha! Maybe we need to combine these threads. From what I hear from others youre definitely in at Miami, and that certificate in Estate Planning will really help a lot!

USD will probably be pretty quick, I think. And it is a good program! I'm keeping my fingers crossed for both of us. Keep me posted!
Ha! Maybe we need to combine these threads. From what I hear from others youre definitely in at Miami, and that certificate in Estate Planning will really help a lot!

USD will probably be pretty quick, I think. And it is a good program! I'm keeping my fingers crossed for both of us. Keep me posted!
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bdc
I just found out today that Im in at Miami. So one down two to go. Im pretty happy about it. Fingers still crossed for UW. With Miami and UW I am not sure which one I would pick. Miami has a more concentrated program and is more respected, UW is in Tax and in an area where I grew up in and may want to start my career. Thoughts?

Yeah we are both in pretty good programs, good luck on the others....just UW and USD that you applied right?
I just found out today that Im in at Miami. So one down two to go. Im pretty happy about it. Fingers still crossed for UW. With Miami and UW I am not sure which one I would pick. Miami has a more concentrated program and is more respected, UW is in Tax and in an area where I grew up in and may want to start my career. Thoughts?

Yeah we are both in pretty good programs, good luck on the others....just UW and USD that you applied right?
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SMW
If you want to live in Seattle, the UW LLM is the way to go. Think of all the UW alum around here.

I'm in the program right now. Its great.
If you want to live in Seattle, the UW LLM is the way to go. Think of all the UW alum around here.

I'm in the program right now. Its great.
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bdc
You say the program is great, can you tell me about the job prospects, career services, and have you secured a job? What are the starting salaries coming out of the program? How many of your classmates already have secured employment?

Thank you in advance. I just got accepeted to UW and am trying to figure out whether or not to go there or Miami estate planning llm.
You say the program is great, can you tell me about the job prospects, career services, and have you secured a job? What are the starting salaries coming out of the program? How many of your classmates already have secured employment?

Thank you in advance. I just got accepeted to UW and am trying to figure out whether or not to go there or Miami estate planning llm.
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OoiRingo
If you're in the top 15% of a top 100 school and you did well in your tax course work, there's no question that you'll get into UW.

The professors at UW are excellent, and the program is well run. The courses tend to take a more pragmatic approach and focus on issues tax attorneys face in a tax practice. I feel I'm getting my money's worth.

However, the job market in Seattle is a lot like the job market in the rest of the country - poor. Law firms are contracting and there is a lot of talent on the market. Also, Seattle tends to be a tight-knit community. The UW LLM will certainly help if you want to practice here, but if you don't already have some connection to this region, you might have difficulty finding a job. Seattle is a very competitive legal market because there are 2 very good law schools in the city (Seattle U & UW) and 5 law schools in Washington and Oregon. A deep talent pool plus a contraction in the legal market is not a good combination for those graduating from law school or an LLM.

To answer your questions specifically:
I don't know what the starting salaries are, but I would guess $50 to $80K for those who find jobs. Firms don't need to pay because there is so much talent on the market.

I don't know anyone who has secured employment while in the program. The only people I know who have jobs, are those that practiced law first before entering the program.

But note that this isn't a commentary on UW's LLM program; it's just the result of the worst recession since the depression. I think law and LLM grads in general are having a very difficult time finding a job. Hell, a lot of the 3Ls that thought they had jobs lined up are losing their offers or are having their start-dates pushed back up to a year.

The estate planning curriculum at UW is incredible. Dwight Drake speaks nationally on estate and business planning issues, and his courses focus on what you need to know to be a good attorney and estate planner. Also, if you know your estate planning, then you know that the treatise "Price on Contemporary Estate Planning" is the best. It is co-authored by Sam Donaldson, who is one of the most engaging and entertaining professors I've ever had.

I suggest you review the UW Tax LLM blog. This is where the school posts job postings and general information. As you will see, there aren't many job postings.
http://uwgraduatetaxprogram.blogspot.com/

You also need to review legal blogs such as www.abovethelaw.com and www.lawshucks.com to get an idea of what's happening in the legal market.
If you're in the top 15% of a top 100 school and you did well in your tax course work, there's no question that you'll get into UW.

The professors at UW are excellent, and the program is well run. The courses tend to take a more pragmatic approach and focus on issues tax attorneys face in a tax practice. I feel I'm getting my money's worth.

However, the job market in Seattle is a lot like the job market in the rest of the country - poor. Law firms are contracting and there is a lot of talent on the market. Also, Seattle tends to be a tight-knit community. The UW LLM will certainly help if you want to practice here, but if you don't already have some connection to this region, you might have difficulty finding a job. Seattle is a very competitive legal market because there are 2 very good law schools in the city (Seattle U & UW) and 5 law schools in Washington and Oregon. A deep talent pool plus a contraction in the legal market is not a good combination for those graduating from law school or an LLM.

To answer your questions specifically:
I don't know what the starting salaries are, but I would guess $50 to $80K for those who find jobs. Firms don't need to pay because there is so much talent on the market.

I don't know anyone who has secured employment while in the program. The only people I know who have jobs, are those that practiced law first before entering the program.

But note that this isn't a commentary on UW's LLM program; it's just the result of the worst recession since the depression. I think law and LLM grads in general are having a very difficult time finding a job. Hell, a lot of the 3Ls that thought they had jobs lined up are losing their offers or are having their start-dates pushed back up to a year.

The estate planning curriculum at UW is incredible. Dwight Drake speaks nationally on estate and business planning issues, and his courses focus on what you need to know to be a good attorney and estate planner. Also, if you know your estate planning, then you know that the treatise "Price on Contemporary Estate Planning" is the best. It is co-authored by Sam Donaldson, who is one of the most engaging and entertaining professors I've ever had.

I suggest you review the UW Tax LLM blog. This is where the school posts job postings and general information. As you will see, there aren't many job postings.
http://uwgraduatetaxprogram.blogspot.com/

You also need to review legal blogs such as www.abovethelaw.com and www.lawshucks.com to get an idea of what's happening in the legal market.

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bdc
Thanks for the insight Ringo, very helpful. While I would look forward to the great education, the most important point of adding yet another year of school is to get a job. For that reason I have decided to go to Miami for an estate planning llm. Im sure the education will be great too but that seattle market seems too tough to chance right about now.
Thanks for the insight Ringo, very helpful. While I would look forward to the great education, the most important point of adding yet another year of school is to get a job. For that reason I have decided to go to Miami for an estate planning llm. Im sure the education will be great too but that seattle market seems too tough to chance right about now.
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Jumping in here a little late.

I am a NC resident, graduate from an evening part time program in May. NC Bar in July. I am originally from Miami, and am considering taking the FL Bar in Feb. 2010, depending on job development here. I primarily want to practice family law, but worked briefly as a clerk for an estate planning attorney and so am considering doing some estate planning, to ensure that I am more well rounded.

I hadn't thought of doing an LLM before (only thought they were for Tax, and that isn't an interest of mine). But I am looking into it now as another back-up plan (one of many percolating).

When is the application process, usually? How long are the full-time programs (or part time if need be)? Stats to get in?

Would love some guidance.

Thanks! :-)
Jumping in here a little late.

I am a NC resident, graduate from an evening part time program in May. NC Bar in July. I am originally from Miami, and am considering taking the FL Bar in Feb. 2010, depending on job development here. I primarily want to practice family law, but worked briefly as a clerk for an estate planning attorney and so am considering doing some estate planning, to ensure that I am more well rounded.

I hadn't thought of doing an LLM before (only thought they were for Tax, and that isn't an interest of mine). But I am looking into it now as another back-up plan (one of many percolating).

When is the application process, usually? How long are the full-time programs (or part time if need be)? Stats to get in?

Would love some guidance.

Thanks! :-)
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truthtelle...
The full-time profs teaching in the UW Tax LLM program are very good. The adjunct profs (and there are many) are typically also very good with a few exceptions.

Regarding the UW Tax LLM - beware - before 2009 there was no career counselor designated to assist LLM students in finding jobs. The class of 2008 had no assistance finding a job and many remain unemployed. As of 2009, there is a part-time career counselor working for the tax LLM program. Inquire as to how many of the 2009 class have received employment offers before deciding to enter the program if you are not already employed.
The full-time profs teaching in the UW Tax LLM program are very good. The adjunct profs (and there are many) are typically also very good with a few exceptions.

Regarding the UW Tax LLM - beware - before 2009 there was no career counselor designated to assist LLM students in finding jobs. The class of 2008 had no assistance finding a job and many remain unemployed. As of 2009, there is a part-time career counselor working for the tax LLM program. Inquire as to how many of the 2009 class have received employment offers before deciding to enter the program if you are not already employed.
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OoiRingo
LegalEagle2009 says: but worked briefly as a clerk for an estate planning attorney and so am considering doing some estate planning, to ensure that I am more well rounded.

I hadn't thought of doing an LLM before (only thought they were for Tax, and that isn't an interest of mine)


What did you learn from that estate planning attorney if you didn't learn that 99% of estate planning is helping clients avoid income, estate, gift, and generation skipping taxes?

As for your questions, every LLM program has different requirements, so I suggest you choose the type of LLM you would like to pursue and review the information provided by the school that offers that LLM.
<blockquote>LegalEagle2009 says: but worked briefly as a clerk for an estate planning attorney and so am considering doing some estate planning, to ensure that I am more well rounded.

I hadn't thought of doing an LLM before (only thought they were for Tax, and that isn't an interest of mine)</blockquote>

What did you learn from that estate planning attorney if you didn't learn that 99% of estate planning is helping clients avoid income, estate, gift, and generation skipping taxes?

As for your questions, every LLM program has different requirements, so I suggest you choose the type of LLM you would like to pursue and review the information provided by the school that offers that LLM.
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katoda
So far I have been accepted to UW and SMU (with a scholarship). I am still awaiting to hear back from USD, Loyola, and UF (I think that one is a long shot). I am having a difficult time deciding on whether to accept SMU, they have set an accept/decline deadline which is fast approaching...any insight?
So far I have been accepted to UW and SMU (with a scholarship). I am still awaiting to hear back from USD, Loyola, and UF (I think that one is a long shot). I am having a difficult time deciding on whether to accept SMU, they have set an accept/decline deadline which is fast approaching...any insight?
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bdc
So which one did you decide on?
So which one did you decide on?
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