Harvard Admission Decisions


Awojc

If Harvard's LLM admissions were strictly for international students, then they wouldn't have separate criteria for American JDs indicating what they are seeking from such applicants. I don't believe that 159 of 160 students are international, but I also don't believe that the percentage of American LLM candidates is as high as 40%. Anyone with ACTUAL knowledge?


Someone just provided actual knowledge. You are entitled to disagree with it. Last year HLS admitted 6 candidates from my country (in Africa) alone. If the class is just 160 this makes it likely that up to 159 of the current class could really be foreign.

<blockquote>If Harvard's LLM admissions were strictly for international students, then they wouldn't have separate criteria for American JDs indicating what they are seeking from such applicants. I don't believe that 159 of 160 students are international, but I also don't believe that the percentage of American LLM candidates is as high as 40%. Anyone with ACTUAL knowledge?</blockquote>

Someone just provided actual knowledge. You are entitled to disagree with it. Last year HLS admitted 6 candidates from my country (in Africa) alone. If the class is just 160 this makes it likely that up to 159 of the current class could really be foreign.
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supranote1

Have you applied for the LLM in 2010-2011? I believe that the program is tailored primarily toward international students, but I do feel that 1 candidate from the United States is a bit small. It's hard to know, too, how many American applicants there are, but if Harvard is setting aside only 1 seat for an American student, that sound a bit Bakke to me.

Have you applied for the LLM in 2010-2011? I believe that the program is tailored primarily toward international students, but I do feel that 1 candidate from the United States is a bit small. It's hard to know, too, how many American applicants there are, but if Harvard is setting aside only 1 seat for an American student, that sound a bit Bakke to me.
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Awojc

Have you applied for the LLM in 2010-2011? I believe that the program is tailored primarily toward international students, but I do feel that 1 candidate from the United States is a bit small. It's hard to know, too, how many American applicants there are, but if Harvard is setting aside only 1 seat for an American student, that sound a bit Bakke to me.


Yes. I have applied. I also think it is unlikely that only 1 guy from US should be admitted. But, it is possible. And, sounds like music to my ears anyway.

<blockquote>Have you applied for the LLM in 2010-2011? I believe that the program is tailored primarily toward international students, but I do feel that 1 candidate from the United States is a bit small. It's hard to know, too, how many American applicants there are, but if Harvard is setting aside only 1 seat for an American student, that sound a bit Bakke to me.</blockquote>

Yes. I have applied. I also think it is unlikely that only 1 guy from US should be admitted. But, it is possible. And, sounds like music to my ears anyway.
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supranote1

Can you tell me if your application status has gone from "received" to "complete" yet?

Can you tell me if your application status has gone from "received" to "complete" yet?
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Awojc

No it hasn't. Like i noted earlier on this Board, it is a general or near-general issue.

No it hasn't. Like i noted earlier on this Board, it is a general or near-general issue.
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supranote1

I am new to the boards and have not combed many of the previous postings. Although I'm sorry your response is duplicative, I appreciate it at this time nonetheless.

I am new to the boards and have not combed many of the previous postings. Although I'm sorry your response is duplicative, I appreciate it at this time nonetheless.
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GSAR

Let me correct my previous statement. There are actually 03 (three) American students in the 2010 class at HLS. I went to look at the graduate program "yearbook." Anyway, it is still a low number...

Sorry for the inconvenience.

Let me correct my previous statement. There are actually 03 (three) American students in the 2010 class at HLS. I went to look at the graduate program "yearbook." Anyway, it is still a low number...

Sorry for the inconvenience.
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supranote1

Where is the "yearbook"? Is it accessible somewhere online? Do you know from which schools the three individuals earned their JDs?

Where is the "yearbook"? Is it accessible somewhere online? Do you know from which schools the three individuals earned their JDs?
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GSAR

The book I have is not available online, sorry. The hold Jds at: Northeastern University, Marquette University, and North Carolina Central University.

The book I have is not available online, sorry. The hold Jds at: Northeastern University, Marquette University, and North Carolina Central University.
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supranote1

Thank you for sharing. Those are interesting law schools, I'm actually surprised. I wonder what the chances are for someone from a tier 1 law school....

Thank you for sharing. Those are interesting law schools, I'm actually surprised. I wonder what the chances are for someone from a tier 1 law school....
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Awojc

American JD holders are less aggresive than international students about the LLM. The JD, I understand, is a very prestigious degree. Most JD holders go on to earn a decent living without any need for an LLM. Except, of course for those planning to go into academics.

American JD holders are less aggresive than international students about the LLM. The JD, I understand, is a very prestigious degree. Most JD holders go on to earn a decent living without any need for an LLM. Except, of course for those planning to go into academics.
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supranote1

That is true that fewer American students pursue the LLM, though tax LLMs are popular programs for Americans with JDs. I am curious about the 3 American JDs for the Class of 2010, especially since I attended a "higher ranked" institution. It makes me wonder whether my credentials, which I believe make me extremely qualified, may be viewed as too much for what the program is intended to offer. The second-guessing is frustrating! Two more months....

That is true that fewer American students pursue the LLM, though tax LLMs are popular programs for Americans with JDs. I am curious about the 3 American JDs for the Class of 2010, especially since I attended a "higher ranked" institution. It makes me wonder whether my credentials, which I believe make me extremely qualified, may be viewed as too much for what the program is intended to offer. The second-guessing is frustrating! Two more months....
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togatoga=c...

I hear you supra. It's a long time. This is a bit off topic, but I happen to know that they have already sent out acceptance letters to those who are doing the JD in Harvard next year. One of my friends made it in. He is extremely talented and extremely qualified. Looks like the LLM students are the final applicants to hear...

I hear you supra. It's a long time. This is a bit off topic, but I happen to know that they have already sent out acceptance letters to those who are doing the JD in Harvard next year. One of my friends made it in. He is extremely talented and extremely qualified. Looks like the LLM students are the final applicants to hear...
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stk

If Harvard's LLM admissions were strictly for international students, then they wouldn't have separate criteria for American JDs indicating what they are seeking from such applicants. I don't believe that 159 of 160 students are international, but I also don't believe that the percentage of American LLM candidates is as high as 40%. Anyone with ACTUAL knowledge?


Hi guys,
I attended the LL.M. program of Columbia last year and I passed the NY Bar Exam this July; as I had friends at Harvard as well, I dare say that I have actual knowledge. US JDs almost never apply for an LL.M. (with the exception of a Tax LL.M.); there is no need for them to do so as they know where they will be working after graduation since their 2nd year at law school. Also, if they want to get involved in academia, there is no need for them to get a PhD (although of course that is considered advantageous) like in Europe. So, the number of US JDs attending LL.M. programs is extremely small; at Columbia we had only 3 and I am sure at Harvard the number was not that bigger. However, even if there are not many US students, you'll attend the same classes as the JDs do and be graded with the same curve they do.

<blockquote>If Harvard's LLM admissions were strictly for international students, then they wouldn't have separate criteria for American JDs indicating what they are seeking from such applicants. I don't believe that 159 of 160 students are international, but I also don't believe that the percentage of American LLM candidates is as high as 40%. Anyone with ACTUAL knowledge?</blockquote>

Hi guys,
I attended the LL.M. program of Columbia last year and I passed the NY Bar Exam this July; as I had friends at Harvard as well, I dare say that I have actual knowledge. US JDs almost never apply for an LL.M. (with the exception of a Tax LL.M.); there is no need for them to do so as they know where they will be working after graduation since their 2nd year at law school. Also, if they want to get involved in academia, there is no need for them to get a PhD (although of course that is considered advantageous) like in Europe. So, the number of US JDs attending LL.M. programs is extremely small; at Columbia we had only 3 and I am sure at Harvard the number was not that bigger. However, even if there are not many US students, you'll attend the same classes as the JDs do and be graded with the same curve they do.
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Awojc

If Harvard's LLM admissions were strictly for international students, then they wouldn't have separate criteria for American JDs indicating what they are seeking from such applicants. I don't believe that 159 of 160 students are international, but I also don't believe that the percentage of American LLM candidates is as high as 40%. Anyone with ACTUAL knowledge?


Hi guys,
I attended the LL.M. program of Columbia last year and I passed the NY Bar Exam this July; as I had friends at Harvard as well, I dare say that I have actual knowledge. US JDs almost never apply for an LL.M. (with the exception of a Tax LL.M.); there is no need for them to do so as they know where they will be working after graduation since their 2nd year at law school. Also, if they want to get involved in academia, there is no need for them to get a PhD (although of course that is considered advantageous) like in Europe. So, the number of US JDs attending LL.M. programs is extremely small; at Columbia we had only 3 and I am sure at Harvard the number was not that bigger. However, even if there are not many US students, you'll attend the same classes as the JDs do and be graded with the same curve they do.


Yea. About what i tend to hate in US LLMs. You attend the same classes and are graded the same way as undergrads. Unlike at Oxbridge where the masters programme is highly specialized, and tailored for serious advanced learning.

<blockquote><blockquote>If Harvard's LLM admissions were strictly for international students, then they wouldn't have separate criteria for American JDs indicating what they are seeking from such applicants. I don't believe that 159 of 160 students are international, but I also don't believe that the percentage of American LLM candidates is as high as 40%. Anyone with ACTUAL knowledge?</blockquote>

Hi guys,
I attended the LL.M. program of Columbia last year and I passed the NY Bar Exam this July; as I had friends at Harvard as well, I dare say that I have actual knowledge. US JDs almost never apply for an LL.M. (with the exception of a Tax LL.M.); there is no need for them to do so as they know where they will be working after graduation since their 2nd year at law school. Also, if they want to get involved in academia, there is no need for them to get a PhD (although of course that is considered advantageous) like in Europe. So, the number of US JDs attending LL.M. programs is extremely small; at Columbia we had only 3 and I am sure at Harvard the number was not that bigger. However, even if there are not many US students, you'll attend the same classes as the JDs do and be graded with the same curve they do.</blockquote>

Yea. About what i tend to hate in US LLMs. You attend the same classes and are graded the same way as undergrads. Unlike at Oxbridge where the masters programme is highly specialized, and tailored for serious advanced learning.
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stk

I would have to disagree on this one. The JDs have already gotten a bachelor degree and in the top law schools they may even have a master or a PhD degree before attending law school; also, most of them have serious work experience. Even though I was accepted to both Oxford and Cambridge I preferred attending Columbia as I would have the opportunity to attend more courses (8 instead of 4 at Oxbridge); also, in my opinion the LL.M. in the US is much more intensive as you attend classes 2-3 times a week for each course instead of 1 time per week for each course. But, this is just my personal view and everyone knows what's best for himself.

I would have to disagree on this one. The JDs have already gotten a bachelor degree and in the top law schools they may even have a master or a PhD degree before attending law school; also, most of them have serious work experience. Even though I was accepted to both Oxford and Cambridge I preferred attending Columbia as I would have the opportunity to attend more courses (8 instead of 4 at Oxbridge); also, in my opinion the LL.M. in the US is much more intensive as you attend classes 2-3 times a week for each course instead of 1 time per week for each course. But, this is just my personal view and everyone knows what's best for himself.
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medam

I was admitted last year at Harvards LL.M. program and I received all the information related to the course, including the list of admitted students (not all of them accepted the offer).

There were 21 Americans accepted, I just checked again.

I got a deferral and will join the class this year. If I can help you with any information do not hesitate to contact me.

By the way, all the admissions will be sent the same day (mid march). Do not expect Harvard to announce the date.

Regards!

I was admitted last year at Harvard’s LL.M. program and I received all the information related to the course, including the list of admitted students (not all of them accepted the offer).

There were 21 Americans accepted, I just checked again.

I got a deferral and will join the class this year. If I can help you with any information do not hesitate to contact me.

By the way, all the admissions will be sent the same day (mid march). Do not expect Harvard to announce the date.

Regards!
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jsd

There are actually 03 (three) American students in the 2010 class at HLS. I went to look at the graduate program "yearbook." Anyway, it is still a low number...


I was admitted last year at Harvards LL.M. program and I received all the information related to the course, including the list of admitted students (not all of them accepted the offer).

There were 21 Americans accepted, I just checked again.


21 versus 3 Americans in 2010 - that is quite a difference.

<blockquote> There are actually 03 (three) American students in the 2010 class at HLS. I went to look at the graduate program "yearbook." Anyway, it is still a low number...
</blockquote>

<blockquote>I was admitted last year at Harvard’s LL.M. program and I received all the information related to the course, including the list of admitted students (not all of them accepted the offer).

There were 21 Americans accepted, I just checked again.
</blockquote>

21 versus 3 Americans in 2010 - that is quite a difference.
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supranote1

It seems that 21 were admitted but 3 matriculated. One poster seems to have deferred, thus suggesting that of the 21, 4 ultimately chose to affirmatively attend (whether in 2009 or 2010). I wonder what prompted the other 17 to decline their acceptances. Either way, one can speculate forever....

It seems that 21 were admitted but 3 matriculated. One poster seems to have deferred, thus suggesting that of the 21, 4 ultimately chose to affirmatively attend (whether in 2009 or 2010). I wonder what prompted the other 17 to decline their acceptances. Either way, one can speculate forever....
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niubility

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