Chicago 2016-2017


Hi everyone! Let me pipe in another student of the LLM class of 2016 at UofC, clinging to our labels. I disagree that class size is something that does not have an impact. It changes everything! We have become great friends, with lawyers from all over the world, which makes the experience so much more intense. I dont believe that is possible in many of the larger programs. This has nothing to do with a desire to be exclusive, but with a distinct character of education at the school. The small class size as well as the small size of the law school overall allows for a lot more participation by every student. We discuss constantly and openly in class and among our friends. The same goes for communication with the faculty: small size means an entirely different level of engagement between faculty and students.
Speaking of which the two judges you named just happened to be two of the most influential legal scholars, and their scholarship lives in every single class. It is not simply a label the school decorates itself with. It IS the law school. The faculty are invested in their respective subject and in conveying it in the classroom as well as outside of class, in a way I have never experienced before.
Obviously, everyone has to make their own decision. This applies to the location (Chicago trumps NYC in every regard, and I am saying this in February!), as well as to what you are looking for in your LL.M. All of us here deliberately chose UofC over other schools, and I can safely assume we would do it all over again!
Hi everyone! Let me pipe in – another student of the LLM class of 2016 at UofC, “clinging” to our “labels”. I disagree that class size is something that does not have an impact. It changes everything! We have become great friends, with lawyers from all over the world, which makes the experience so much more intense. I don’t believe that is possible in many of the larger programs. This has nothing to do with a desire to be “exclusive”, but with a distinct character of education at the school. The small class size as well as the small size of the law school overall allows for a lot more participation by every student. We discuss constantly and openly in class and among our friends. The same goes for communication with the faculty: small size means an entirely different level of engagement between faculty and students.
Speaking of which – the two judges you named just happened to be two of the most influential legal scholars, and their scholarship lives in every single class. It is not simply a label the school decorates itself with. It IS the law school. The faculty are invested in their respective subject and in conveying it in the classroom as well as outside of class, in a way I have never experienced before.
Obviously, everyone has to make their own decision. This applies to the location (Chicago trumps NYC in every regard, and I am saying this in February!), as well as to what you are looking for in your LL.M. All of us here deliberately chose UofC over other schools, and I can safely assume we would do it all over again!
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imnc
I dont believe that is possible in many of the larger programs. This has nothing to do with a desire to be exclusive, but with a distinct character of education at the school. The small class size as well as the small size of the law school overall allows for a lot more participation by every student. We discuss constantly and openly in class and among our friends. The same goes for communication with the faculty: small size means an entirely different level of engagement between faculty and students.


While I admire your zealousness in standing up to defend your choice, the reasons you quote are poor.

UC has a student teacher ratio of 8.4:1. Despite the larger class size of Columbia the ratio is 6.3:1. The 'better communication' argument is therefore flawed. It is not as if each class is a combined class where being one of 70 gives better attention than one in 260.

the two judges you named just happened to be two of the most influential legal scholars, and their scholarship lives in every single class. It is not simply a label the school decorates itself with. It IS the law school.


While they are both much cited judges and scholars in the same domain, it is somewhat foolish to build a law school around two people - it makes the school one-dimensional and reduces the attraction to students with other interets except this narrow one. It's a pity that Chicago cannot look beyond these two. Nonetheless if law and economics is a must-have, even at the cost of some prestige i guess UC is the place to go.


The faculty are invested in their respective subject and in conveying it in the classroom as well as outside of class, in a way I have never experienced before. Obviously, everyone has to make their own decision.


This applies to pretty much any of the top 25 law schools in america.

This applies to the location (Chicago trumps NYC in every regard, and I am saying this in February!)


Location is the fashionable fallback reason and I consider it a non-issue in selection of law school unless it is located in a warzone or antarctica. But if at all location must play a role I think it is safe to say New York (or maybe D.C.) are the best locations out there.

All of us here deliberately chose UofC over other schools


Depends which law schools you are referring to. Like I referred to earlier, the majority of Chicago acceptances do not take up Chicago. I don't pretend Columbia is the No. 1 destination either .. I am sure most with a Harvard offer would have taken up HLS. But let's not fool ourselves here.
<blockquote> I don’t believe that is possible in many of the larger programs. This has nothing to do with a desire to be “exclusive”, but with a distinct character of education at the school. The small class size as well as the small size of the law school overall allows for a lot more participation by every student. We discuss constantly and openly in class and among our friends. The same goes for communication with the faculty: small size means an entirely different level of engagement between faculty and students. </blockquote>

While I admire your zealousness in standing up to defend your choice, the reasons you quote are poor.

UC has a student teacher ratio of 8.4:1. Despite the larger class size of Columbia the ratio is 6.3:1. The 'better communication' argument is therefore flawed. It is not as if each class is a combined class where being one of 70 gives better attention than one in 260.

<blockquote>the two judges you named just happened to be two of the most influential legal scholars, and their scholarship lives in every single class. It is not simply a label the school decorates itself with. It IS the law school. </blockquote>

While they are both much cited judges and scholars in the same domain, it is somewhat foolish to build a law school around two people - it makes the school one-dimensional and reduces the attraction to students with other interets except this narrow one. It's a pity that Chicago cannot look beyond these two. Nonetheless if law and economics is a must-have, even at the cost of some prestige i guess UC is the place to go.


<blockquote> The faculty are invested in their respective subject and in conveying it in the classroom as well as outside of class, in a way I have never experienced before. Obviously, everyone has to make their own decision.</blockquote>

This applies to pretty much any of the top 25 law schools in america.

<blockquote> This applies to the location (Chicago trumps NYC in every regard, and I am saying this in February!)</blockquote>

Location is the fashionable fallback reason and I consider it a non-issue in selection of law school unless it is located in a warzone or antarctica. But if at all location must play a role I think it is safe to say New York (or maybe D.C.) are the best locations out there.

<blockquote> All of us here deliberately chose UofC over other schools</blockquote>

Depends which law schools you are referring to. Like I referred to earlier, the majority of Chicago acceptances do not take up Chicago. I don't pretend Columbia is the No. 1 destination either .. I am sure most with a Harvard offer would have taken up HLS. But let's not fool ourselves here.
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scarecrow
One thing I know for sure, and which has not really been mentioned at all in this thread, is that the calibre of a school's student body is just as important as other factors (e.g. faculty, "prestige").

On that basis, I would never in a million years go to Columbia if imnc is in any way representative of the sort of people who go there. Not only does (s)he sound like, to be blunt, an ass; but his/her arguments are riddled with sweeping generalisations, dressing up anecdotes as hard evidence, and presenting the use of statistics (s)he has obviously made up (e.g. "90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere"). If Columbia, one of the highest ranked universities in the US, accepts that sort of garbage then I think I should probably reconsider whether an LLM in America is worth the hype...
One thing I know for sure, and which has not really been mentioned at all in this thread, is that the calibre of a school's student body is just as important as other factors (e.g. faculty, "prestige").

On that basis, I would never in a million years go to Columbia if imnc is in any way representative of the sort of people who go there. Not only does (s)he sound like, to be blunt, an ass; but his/her arguments are riddled with sweeping generalisations, dressing up anecdotes as hard evidence, and presenting the use of statistics (s)he has obviously made up (e.g. "90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere"). If Columbia, one of the highest ranked universities in the US, accepts that sort of garbage then I think I should probably reconsider whether an LLM in America is worth the hype...
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dyc
I don't want to argue whether Chicago is a better choice over Columbia or other higher or lower ranked schools, since I believe everyone will be happy with their choices after careful consideration of which school will be the best for them. Also, I don't feel comfortable bashing other schools since I'm only attending Chicago's program and clearly won't have first hand information of other schools. And I certainly don't want to make up or guess some stats that has no basis.

But I do want to share some unique experiences here(well at least I didn't have it in my first law school, I don't know if other American Law Schools have it or not, again, I don't want to act like I've attended every school and provide some false info.)

1. The interaction with faculties-- We can easily have lunch or coffee with professors, and the law school pays for it! And also, almost all professors have open-door policy, that means you can go to them whenever you want.

2. Interaction with classmates-- Well, I believe everyone can make a lot of friends in each school. But I really feel that 70 people is a great number that is big enough for us to have friends from so many different countries but small enough to prevent some from only hanging out with people from their own countries. Its hard to stress enough how intimate our whole class are.
Also, law school provides sufficient funds for us to hold National Dinner for the whole class.

3. Lunch talks This is awesome. Free lunch literally every school day!! And of course, along with great talks from lawyers, judges, professors, non-profitsetc from all kinds of different fields!

4. The sense of community LLMs are really deemed as a part of the law school community with the JDs. Most LLMs have good JD friends and actively participate in law school organizations and events like Law School Musicaletc. And the law school also divide us into groups with JDs and provide us $1000/year in order to facilitate our interactions with local students.

5. The City Chicago is really an amazing city. Though I also love NY and Cali, I would have made the same choice again.

I can go on and on the whole day if I have the time haha. But I can really tell you, Chicago will be a great choice!

imnc mentioned most people who got admitted to UC will rather choose Columbia, NYU, Georgetown, Michigan on the east coast or UCB on the west coast . I can tell you that almost everyone in our class has offers from those schools and still came here. That doesnt mean I think those schools are worse than UC, but rather UC are a lot of peoples top choice. And I can tell you the yielding rate is much higher than your guess, though I can't share the stats here.

imnc really amazed me by how desperate he/she wants to bash on UC that he/she said we have poor faculty in con law and corporate law. Geoffrey Stone, David Strauss just to name a few. UC also divides con law into 5 courses, so students can have in depth understanding for each part of the constitutional law(Governments structure, freedom of speechetc). And as to corporate and other business law, UC has Baird, Fischel, Hendersonetc.

Lastly, I just want to remind people on this forum that everyone can say anything on the internet and most people only attend one LLM program. It seems very weird to me how a person that never attends or even visits Chicago can have so many negative things to say about it.

P.S. Everyone I know that is in a LLM program is having a great time, no matter which school theyre in. Just pick the one that is right for you and base your decision on reliable information. UC has created a Facebook group for admitted students, asking questions there can be answered by people who actually are admitted and in UChicagos program:) Good luck to everyone.

Cheers,
David
UChicago LLM Class of 2016
I don't want to argue whether Chicago is a better choice over Columbia or other higher or lower ranked schools, since I believe everyone will be happy with their choices after careful consideration of which school will be the best for them. Also, I don't feel comfortable bashing other schools since I'm only attending Chicago's program and clearly won't have first hand information of other schools. And I certainly don't want to make up or guess some stats that has no basis.

But I do want to share some unique experiences here(well at least I didn't have it in my first law school, I don't know if other American Law Schools have it or not, again, I don't want to act like I've attended every school and provide some false info.)

1. The interaction with faculties-- We can easily have lunch or coffee with professors, and the law school pays for it! And also, almost all professors have “open-door” policy, that means you can go to them whenever you want.

2. Interaction with classmates-- Well, I believe everyone can make a lot of friends in each school. But I really feel that 70 people is a great number that is big enough for us to have friends from so many different countries but small enough to prevent some from only hanging out with people from their own countries. It’s hard to stress enough how intimate our whole class are.
Also, law school provides sufficient funds for us to hold “National Dinner” for the whole class.

3. Lunch talks— This is awesome. Free lunch literally every school day!! And of course, along with great talks from lawyers, judges, professors, non-profits…etc from all kinds of different fields!

4. The sense of community— LLMs are “really” deemed as a part of the law school community with the JDs. Most LLMs have good JD friends and actively participate in law school organizations and events like Law School Musical…etc. And the law school also divide us into groups with JDs and provide us $1000/year in order to facilitate our interactions with local students.

5. The City— Chicago is really an amazing city. Though I also love NY and Cali, I would have made the same choice again.

I can go on and on the whole day if I have the time haha. But I can really tell you, Chicago will be a great choice!

imnc mentioned most people who got admitted to UC will rather choose Columbia, NYU, Georgetown, Michigan on the east coast or UCB on the west coast . I can tell you that almost everyone in our class has offers from those schools and still came here. That doesn’t mean I think those schools are “worse” than UC, but rather UC are a lot of people’s top choice. And I can tell you the yielding rate is much higher than your guess, though I can't share the stats here.

imnc really amazed me by how desperate he/she wants to bash on UC that he/she said we have poor faculty in con law and corporate law. Geoffrey Stone, David Strauss… just to name a few. UC also divides con law into 5 courses, so students can have in depth understanding for each part of the constitutional law(Government’s structure, freedom of speech…etc). And as to corporate and other business law, UC has Baird, Fischel, Henderson…etc.

Lastly, I just want to remind people on this forum that everyone can say anything on the internet and most people only attend one LLM program. It seems very weird to me how a person that never attends or even visits Chicago can have so many negative things to say about it.

P.S. Everyone I know that is in a LLM program is having a great time, no matter which school they’re in. Just pick the one that is right for you and base your decision on reliable information. UC has created a Facebook group for admitted students, asking questions there can be answered by people who actually are admitted and in UChicago’s program:) Good luck to everyone.

Cheers,
David
UChicago LLM Class of 2016
quote
imnc
but his/her arguments are riddled with sweeping generalisations, dressing up anecdotes as hard evidence, and presenting the use of statistics (s)he has obviously made up (e.g. "90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere").


That is a simple fact. I am sorry it hurts your feelings and I wish there was a nicer way I could sugercoat it for you. It's ultimately better to know these things in advance instead of going someplace with stars in your eyes and then finding out the truth about how choices are made.

All I can say is: Welcome to the real world. If you are offended so easily by ground realities stay at home. Don't attend an LLM program (or any other program). Nobody will be there to hold your hand and give you candy.

Going by your whining I think you should stay away from US law schools in general.
<blockquote> but his/her arguments are riddled with sweeping generalisations, dressing up anecdotes as hard evidence, and presenting the use of statistics (s)he has obviously made up (e.g. "90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere"). </blockquote>

That is a simple fact. I am sorry it hurts your feelings and I wish there was a nicer way I could sugercoat it for you. It's ultimately better to know these things in advance instead of going someplace with stars in your eyes and then finding out the truth about how choices are made.

All I can say is: Welcome to the real world. If you are offended so easily by ground realities stay at home. Don't attend an LLM program (or any other program). Nobody will be there to hold your hand and give you candy.

Going by your whining I think you should stay away from US law schools in general.
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imnc
David,

You sound very naive. Do you think Chicago is unique in offering free lunches and free food to its law students. Actually, I would feel insulted if that is the basis on which someone is expected to make a decision. Anyway, here are some things that may surprise you:

1. All the top law schools right down to GWU and maybe more pay for students to lunch with faculty. It's all factored into the tuition cost. Faculty at all these schools are accessible to students and available to chat freely. I have never cone across a law school where this was not the case.

2. All law schools give money to student clubs to hold events where food and drinks are served for many 'National Dinners' and other dinners and lunches as well. This money is also recovered from your tuition.

3. Lunch talks are the norm at top tier schools. Apart from CLS I have visited Yale and Harvard and every day at noon all these schools organize a bunch of talks where lunch is served.

4. Interaction with JDs. I cannot speak for Chicago but I would be surprised if they were showed much care for LLM students. There is someone on this board currently from Stanford who's experience with JD students there matches my own.

5. Choice of city - This should never be a factor for selection of law school. The only exception being that students who are looking for jobs in the US will find it easier if their law school is close to NY (which is pretty much where the few available jobs are). The much advertised LLM Job Fair is a joke and the only people who make it are those who cold call firms or have contacts. In both those cases effort in the form of visiting or emailing firms is required which is easier if you are close to NYC.My friends from Harvard even pick their Spring semester courses in a way to leave a working day free for travel to NY.

That said, if you had to pick a city it would undoubtedly be New York or D.C.

6. A word on yields - I have a senior who did his LLM last year from Chicago and have some idea as to the yields which are the poorest among law schools pretending to be the elite.

Finally I am sorry you and others from Chicago feel this is a negative comment. I am ready to debate the reasonableness of my views in a fair manner and I think CLS has plenty of its own faults which I have no problem accepting if someone were to point those out.
David,

You sound very naive. Do you think Chicago is unique in offering free lunches and free food to its law students. Actually, I would feel insulted if that is the basis on which someone is expected to make a decision. Anyway, here are some things that may surprise you:

1. All the top law schools right down to GWU and maybe more pay for students to lunch with faculty. It's all factored into the tuition cost. Faculty at all these schools are accessible to students and available to chat freely. I have never cone across a law school where this was not the case.

2. All law schools give money to student clubs to hold events where food and drinks are served for many 'National Dinners' and other dinners and lunches as well. This money is also recovered from your tuition.

3. Lunch talks are the norm at top tier schools. Apart from CLS I have visited Yale and Harvard and every day at noon all these schools organize a bunch of talks where lunch is served.

4. Interaction with JDs. I cannot speak for Chicago but I would be surprised if they were showed much care for LLM students. There is someone on this board currently from Stanford who's experience with JD students there matches my own.

5. Choice of city - This should never be a factor for selection of law school. The only exception being that students who are looking for jobs in the US will find it easier if their law school is close to NY (which is pretty much where the few available jobs are). The much advertised LLM Job Fair is a joke and the only people who make it are those who cold call firms or have contacts. In both those cases effort in the form of visiting or emailing firms is required which is easier if you are close to NYC.My friends from Harvard even pick their Spring semester courses in a way to leave a working day free for travel to NY.

That said, if you had to pick a city it would undoubtedly be New York or D.C.

6. A word on yields - I have a senior who did his LLM last year from Chicago and have some idea as to the yields which are the poorest among law schools pretending to be the elite.

Finally I am sorry you and others from Chicago feel this is a negative comment. I am ready to debate the reasonableness of my views in a fair manner and I think CLS has plenty of its own faults which I have no problem accepting if someone were to point those out.
quote
dyc
Well I have no time or intention to keep arguing with you. This will be my last post here. I just want to point out again that anyone can say anything on the internet, please base your decision on reliable information. In Chicago's case, we have a Facebook page for newly admitted students and will also provide you with contacts of current students.

Quouting imnc:

"I have a senior who did his LLM last year from Chicago and have some idea as to the yields which are the poorest among law schools pretending to be the elite."
"My friends from Harvard
"LLM Job Fair is a joke and the only people who make it are those who cold call firms or have contacts."
"90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere"
"at Chicago, they have 2-3 really good courses as you mention but their constitutional law faculty is (like CLS) poor and their corporate law faculty (unlike CLS) is also bad."

I really find it weird that a student from Columbia has the time to scatter so many wrong information just to make Chicago look bad. Im not upset at all for any negative comment on Chicago. But I do get upset with lies and made-up bullshit. And Im willing to come and say something here because I really have a great time here in Chicago, and I dont want anyone to miss the chance come here because of some false info on the internet. And the fact that imnc keeps saying he/she is telling the truth doesn't make his/her wrong information really become true...

1.The yielding rate is much much more higher than you guess. I know this from chatting with our dean. No LLM program discloses this data, thats why I dont feel appropriate to disclose anything on this forum. But in any case, using a made-up number to bash on a school is not a decent move.

2. Chicago students who participated in the job fair got 7 interviews in average(this is in one of Dean Badgers emails). And a lot of my classmates, including myself, have got callbacks from firms. Some others already have a job offer through contacts before job fair. I would assume students in Harvard have similar or better outcomes.
Im really starting to wonder are you really in Columbia? Or, are you in the U.S. at all? YHS, Chicago, Columbia, Virginia and Michigan have their job fair together at Columbia, which is smaller(the size of participating students) than the one that NYU holds.

3. Regarding faculties. I find it ridiculous that Chicago would need someone to defend their professors. Ive already said something in my previous post, and I dont intend to say anymore. If you only know about Judge Posner among all these great faculties, maybe you should do more research before you call them poor.

I never said those factors should be the only factors when making a decision. Like I said, I dont have any first hand info about other law schools. If they do have the things I mentioned, its great to know that everyone can enjoy the same experience. But again, Chicago really is strong in a lot of aspects in choosing a LLM program(courses, faculties, the city, community, prestigeetc). I advise people to find someone from each school youre considering and chat with them in order to make a decision base on truthful info. At least thats what I did last year and it turned out very well for me.

Good luck to everyone!
Well I have no time or intention to keep arguing with you. This will be my last post here. I just want to point out again that anyone can say anything on the internet, please base your decision on reliable information. In Chicago's case, we have a Facebook page for newly admitted students and will also provide you with contacts of current students.

Quouting imnc:

"I have a senior who did his LLM last year from Chicago and have some idea as to the yields which are the poorest among law schools pretending to be the elite."
"My friends from Harvard“
"LLM Job Fair is a joke and the only people who make it are those who cold call firms or have contacts."
"90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere"
"at Chicago, they have 2-3 really good courses as you mention but their constitutional law faculty is (like CLS) poor and their corporate law faculty (unlike CLS) is also bad."

I really find it weird that a student from Columbia has the time to scatter so many wrong information just to make Chicago look bad. I’m not upset at all for any negative comment on Chicago. But I do get upset with lies and made-up bullshit. And I’m willing to come and say something here because I really have a great time here in Chicago, and I don’t want anyone to miss the chance come here because of some false info on the internet. And the fact that imnc keeps saying he/she is telling the truth doesn't make his/her wrong information really become true...

1.The yielding rate is much much more higher than you guess. I know this from chatting with our dean. No LLM program discloses this data, that’s why I don’t feel appropriate to disclose anything on this forum. But in any case, using a made-up number to bash on a school is not a decent move.

2. Chicago students who participated in the job fair got 7 interviews in average(this is in one of Dean Badger’s emails). And a lot of my classmates, including myself, have got callbacks from firms. Some others already have a job offer through contacts before job fair. I would assume students in Harvard have similar or better outcomes.
I’m really starting to wonder are you really in Columbia? Or, are you in the U.S. at all? YHS, Chicago, Columbia, Virginia and Michigan have their job fair together at Columbia, which is smaller(the size of participating students) than the one that NYU holds.

3. Regarding faculties. I find it ridiculous that Chicago would need someone to defend their professors. I’ve already said something in my previous post, and I don’t intend to say anymore. If you only know about Judge Posner among all these great faculties, maybe you should do more research… before you call them “poor”.

I never said those factors should be the only factors when making a decision. Like I said, I don’t have any first hand info about other law schools. If they do have the things I mentioned, it’s great to know that everyone can enjoy the same experience. But again, Chicago really is strong in a lot of aspects in choosing a LLM program(courses, faculties, the city, community, prestige…etc). I advise people to find someone from each school you’re considering and chat with them in order to make a decision base on truthful info. At least that’s what I did last year and it turned out very well for me.

Good luck to everyone!
quote
Imnc, when you add adjectives and qualifications to your arguments, they lose all their value. I dont know if you learned that in your school or working, but its true. I can tell you from my experience as Associate in the best Law Firm in Arbitration (where you have to argue constantly) in Perú. I just want to add something, since aparently i was not so clear in this. Fortunatelly I already have a job in New York, also in one of the best Law Firms in Arbitration, this time in the world. So if you think that people looking for a Job should live in NYC or close to there, you are totally wrong. So far, we are 3 persons from U.Chicago in the same Law Firm in NYC, and there is also people from Berkeley and other school/cities so far away from NYC. I came to Chicago even against the advice of one of the best International Arbitration Lawyers in USA, who told me that to get a job in Arbitration I should go to Columbia (due to thier Arbitratiom Program). But fortunatelly here I am, with a Job in NYC and not in his Law Firm, just to be clear. So that argument is totally speculatuve, as many other you mentioned. In any case, as David mentioned, guys, base your decisions in real data and research, not mere speculations. This will be my las post as well. Good luck to everyone.
Imnc, when you add adjectives and qualifications to your arguments, they lose all their value. I dont know if you learned that in your school or working, but its true. I can tell you from my experience as Associate in the best Law Firm in Arbitration (where you have to argue constantly) in Perú. I just want to add something, since aparently i was not so clear in this. Fortunatelly I already have a job in New York, also in one of the best Law Firms in Arbitration, this time in the world. So if you think that people looking for a Job should live in NYC or close to there, you are totally wrong. So far, we are 3 persons from U.Chicago in the same Law Firm in NYC, and there is also people from Berkeley and other school/cities so far away from NYC. I came to Chicago even against the advice of one of the best International Arbitration Lawyers in USA, who told me that to get a job in Arbitration I should go to Columbia (due to thier Arbitratiom Program). But fortunatelly here I am, with a Job in NYC and not in his Law Firm, just to be clear. So that argument is totally speculatuve, as many other you mentioned. In any case, as David mentioned, guys, base your decisions in real data and research, not mere speculations. This will be my las post as well. Good luck to everyone.
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scarecrow
Thank your David and pmoribregante for your well reasoned and informative posts. You have done your law school proud.

This will also be my last post as I see little point in having a discussion with someone (imnc) who is clearly on a mission to justify their own life choices by trolling internet forums. I would recommend anyone who reads this thread to ignore imnc's ranting and instead obtain their information from more credible sources. You may ultimately decide that Chicago is not the school for you, but at least you will have based your decision on credible material.
Thank your David and pmoribregante for your well reasoned and informative posts. You have done your law school proud.

This will also be my last post as I see little point in having a discussion with someone (imnc) who is clearly on a mission to justify their own life choices by trolling internet forums. I would recommend anyone who reads this thread to ignore imnc's ranting and instead obtain their information from more credible sources. You may ultimately decide that Chicago is not the school for you, but at least you will have based your decision on credible material.
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imnc
dyc

I can only recommend you once again read the stuff you posted earlier before my response. Like Dean Badger's email with the temptations of wine with Judge Posner (which I found a ridiculous gimmick, maybe HLS will next offer parasailing with Tribe) all you could write about for 10-12 inches were free food, pocket money for students and interactions with JD, along with some opinion about Chicago, and you expect these to be substantive reasons for people making a choice. I wonder whether you're a front for UC's admissions staff.

In your latest rant today all you can cite as solid evidence of yield is a conversation with your dean..who has an interest in the matter and may or may not have kept you fully informed about the statistics.

UC may or may not be worth it for an LLM but you sure are a horrible lawyer and poor advocate.
dyc

I can only recommend you once again read the stuff you posted earlier before my response. Like Dean Badger's email with the temptations of wine with Judge Posner (which I found a ridiculous gimmick, maybe HLS will next offer parasailing with Tribe) all you could write about for 10-12 inches were free food, pocket money for students and interactions with JD, along with some opinion about Chicago, and you expect these to be substantive reasons for people making a choice. I wonder whether you're a front for UC's admissions staff.

In your latest rant today all you can cite as solid evidence of yield is a conversation with your dean..who has an interest in the matter and may or may not have kept you fully informed about the statistics.

UC may or may not be worth it for an LLM but you sure are a horrible lawyer and poor advocate.
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BorLLM
dyc

I can only recommend you once again read the stuff you posted earlier before my response. Like Dean Badger's email with the temptations of wine with Judge Posner (which I found a ridiculous gimmick, maybe HLS will next offer parasailing with Tribe) all you could write about for 10-12 inches were free food, pocket money for students and interactions with JD, along with some opinion about Chicago, and you expect these to be substantive reasons for people making a choice. I wonder whether you're a front for UC's admissions staff.

In your latest rant today all you can cite as solid evidence of yield is a conversation with your dean..who has an interest in the matter and may or may not have kept you fully informed about the statistics.

UC may or may not be worth it for an LLM but you sure are a horrible lawyer and poor advocate.


I must admit that I am quite fascinated by your devotion to your "cause" imnc. It seems like this is something you, for some obscure reason, care deeply for.

I noticed that you in your post criticize dyc's use of the dean as a source. However, simultaneously, you don't seem to cite any source at all for you claim that "90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere"?

Can you please in a short, non-argumentative and non-toxic, post, guide me/ us to the source of this claim?
<blockquote>dyc

I can only recommend you once again read the stuff you posted earlier before my response. Like Dean Badger's email with the temptations of wine with Judge Posner (which I found a ridiculous gimmick, maybe HLS will next offer parasailing with Tribe) all you could write about for 10-12 inches were free food, pocket money for students and interactions with JD, along with some opinion about Chicago, and you expect these to be substantive reasons for people making a choice. I wonder whether you're a front for UC's admissions staff.

In your latest rant today all you can cite as solid evidence of yield is a conversation with your dean..who has an interest in the matter and may or may not have kept you fully informed about the statistics.

UC may or may not be worth it for an LLM but you sure are a horrible lawyer and poor advocate.</blockquote>

I must admit that I am quite fascinated by your devotion to your "cause" imnc. It seems like this is something you, for some obscure reason, care deeply for.

I noticed that you in your post criticize dyc's use of the dean as a source. However, simultaneously, you don't seem to cite any source at all for you claim that "90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere"?

Can you please in a short, non-argumentative and non-toxic, post, guide me/ us to the source of this claim?
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LLM-2015
Hi.

I am a student of the llm class at UChicago. I was wait listed - and I know for certain that Dean Badger is very transparent in his emails and he provides you specific numbers of the wait listed candidates and how many usually are accepted (trend in past years) from the standby pool.

Try you read the attachment in the email he may have sent - and you will have more information. Hope this helps.

@ pmoribregante - thanks!

Is it possible in any way for you to confirm how many offers UChicago makes to fill the 70 seats & how many it puts on the WL?
Hi.

I am a student of the llm class at UChicago. I was wait listed - and I know for certain that Dean Badger is very transparent in his emails and he provides you specific numbers of the wait listed candidates and how many usually are accepted (trend in past years) from the standby pool.

Try you read the attachment in the email he may have sent - and you will have more information. Hope this helps.

<blockquote>@ pmoribregante - thanks!

Is it possible in any way for you to confirm how many offers UChicago makes to fill the 70 seats & how many it puts on the WL?</blockquote>
quote
imnc
I must admit that I am quite fascinated by your devotion to your "cause" imnc. It seems like this is something you, for some obscure reason, care deeply for.

I noticed that you in your post criticize dyc's use of the dean as a source. However, simultaneously, you don't seem to cite any source at all for you claim that "90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere"?


Sure. My 'cause' is to dispel the stupid reasons cited by law schools and alumni for encouraging others to follow their path. I understand how important it can be for self-justification. I have nothing personal against UC (I had an offer from them with part waiver) but it seems all the wrong reasons are being mentioned in support of its selection.

About my sources...I was only replying to what the dyc said about my sources which I have already said is based on my conversations with my classmates here at CLS and also my two close friends at HLS. You are free to accept this or not and take the word of a dean of the law school in question who likely has their own reasons for giving out a statistic. (I would not accept any statistic of this sort from the CLS dean without a large pinch of salt).
<blockquote>I must admit that I am quite fascinated by your devotion to your "cause" imnc. It seems like this is something you, for some obscure reason, care deeply for.

I noticed that you in your post criticize dyc's use of the dean as a source. However, simultaneously, you don't seem to cite any source at all for you claim that "90% of those with confirmed offers from Chicago will go elsewhere"? </blockquote>

Sure. My 'cause' is to dispel the stupid reasons cited by law schools and alumni for encouraging others to follow their path. I understand how important it can be for self-justification. I have nothing personal against UC (I had an offer from them with part waiver) but it seems all the wrong reasons are being mentioned in support of its selection.

About my sources...I was only replying to what the dyc said about my sources which I have already said is based on my conversations with my classmates here at CLS and also my two close friends at HLS. You are free to accept this or not and take the word of a dean of the law school in question who likely has their own reasons for giving out a statistic. (I would not accept any statistic of this sort from the CLS dean without a large pinch of salt).

quote
imnc
To all the current UC students who are posting here, I realise my posts may sound offensive but that is not my intention. So I apologize if i came across as rude. I only reflect my genuine beliefs and the perceptions which I have, founded on my experiences and my discussions with my colleagues, friends not just at CLS but at other law schools. Just to clarify I am not defending CLS although that was my choice (over HLS, for complex reasons). I am always happy to point out the problems of CLS as well but that can be done on the CLS thread.
To all the current UC students who are posting here, I realise my posts may sound offensive but that is not my intention. So I apologize if i came across as rude. I only reflect my genuine beliefs and the perceptions which I have, founded on my experiences and my discussions with my colleagues, friends not just at CLS but at other law schools. Just to clarify I am not defending CLS although that was my choice (over HLS, for complex reasons). I am always happy to point out the problems of CLS as well but that can be done on the CLS thread.
quote
llm2017
To all the current UC students who are posting here, I realise my posts may sound offensive but that is not my intention. So I apologize if i came across as rude. I only reflect my genuine beliefs and the perceptions which I have, founded on my experiences and my discussions with my colleagues, friends not just at CLS but at other law schools. Just to clarify I am not defending CLS although that was my choice (over HLS, for complex reasons). I am always happy to point out the problems of CLS as well but that can be done on the CLS thread.


Hi

I am currently researching LLM programs with a view to aplying for a course starting in 2017. I was really interested in Chicago, as my understanding is that it is very strong in economics (I want to study antitrust law) but I see that you think Columbia is better (I am also interest in that university).

Could u please provide me with more information? Who are the people you have spoken to who have said Columbia is better than Chicago? Are they fellow students of yours?

I saw on another thread that location is important. Do you think I should go for Georgetwon because it is close to the FTC?

I am from Singapore, top 5% of my class. Do you think I would have good chance of getting into Columbia?
<blockquote>To all the current UC students who are posting here, I realise my posts may sound offensive but that is not my intention. So I apologize if i came across as rude. I only reflect my genuine beliefs and the perceptions which I have, founded on my experiences and my discussions with my colleagues, friends not just at CLS but at other law schools. Just to clarify I am not defending CLS although that was my choice (over HLS, for complex reasons). I am always happy to point out the problems of CLS as well but that can be done on the CLS thread. </blockquote>

Hi

I am currently researching LLM programs with a view to aplying for a course starting in 2017. I was really interested in Chicago, as my understanding is that it is very strong in economics (I want to study antitrust law) but I see that you think Columbia is better (I am also interest in that university).

Could u please provide me with more information? Who are the people you have spoken to who have said Columbia is better than Chicago? Are they fellow students of yours?

I saw on another thread that location is important. Do you think I should go for Georgetwon because it is close to the FTC?

I am from Singapore, top 5% of my class. Do you think I would have good chance of getting into Columbia?
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Guys, if you are still thinking about it and you value the rankings.... besides Harvard and Standford, UChicago is one of the few Universities of the USA in the top 10 universities around the world. Think about it :) http://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/world-university-rankings/2015#sorting=rank+region=+country=+faculty=+stars=false+search=
Guys, if you are still thinking about it and you value the rankings.... besides Harvard and Standford, UChicago is one of the few Universities of the USA in the top 10 universities around the world. Think about it :) http://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/world-university-rankings/2015#sorting=rank+region=+country=+faculty=+stars=false+search=
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