Chicago 2016-2017


MikaWQ
Got the email from Richard that I am under standby group. Congratulations to those who get an offer!


Good news for you too...the standby group in Chicago must be the group with the most optimistic chances, after the wait list for Cambridge.


Why is that? I am under the impression that waitlist in Chicago basically denotes rej...
<blockquote><blockquote>Got the email from Richard that I am under standby group. Congratulations to those who get an offer!</blockquote>

Good news for you too...the standby group in Chicago must be the group with the most optimistic chances, after the wait list for Cambridge. </blockquote>

Why is that? I am under the impression that waitlist in Chicago basically denotes rej...
quote
woyaofan
Haha.. That'd make two of us (at least).. Indeed, a very small intake & thus I'm not very optimistic but it is the first school I'll be hearing from as well..

I hear Chicago decisions can be unorthodox where those accepted at YHS sometimes don't make the cut.. Not sure if that is the case..


The result indeed has confused me very much. It seems that they emphasize heavily on working experience, especially in terms of the years an applicant has spent in law firm when applying. For my country, what I have heard is that people who have worked for four or more years but with less attractive credentials are admitted while those with three years or less were mostly rejected or waitlisted despite their solid backgrounds. It seems very weird, especially considering the Chicago's reputation for favoring legal scholars.
<blockquote>Haha.. That'd make two of us (at least).. Indeed, a very small intake & thus I'm not very optimistic but it is the first school I'll be hearing from as well..

I hear Chicago decisions can be unorthodox where those accepted at YHS sometimes don't make the cut.. Not sure if that is the case.. </blockquote>

The result indeed has confused me very much. It seems that they emphasize heavily on working experience, especially in terms of the years an applicant has spent in law firm when applying. For my country, what I have heard is that people who have worked for four or more years but with less attractive credentials are admitted while those with three years or less were mostly rejected or waitlisted despite their solid backgrounds. It seems very weird, especially considering the Chicago's reputation for favoring legal scholars.
quote
AleksLLM
I was denied admission yesterday, I applied to Tax concentration. Congratulations to those who are accepted.
I was denied admission yesterday, I applied to Tax concentration. Congratulations to those who are accepted.
quote
Jlybnn
I am also out :( It is my final year, and I assume that they really care about experience. Congrats to those who got their offers.
I am also out :( It is my final year, and I assume that they really care about experience. Congrats to those who got their offers.
quote
Lynn07
I thought that schools such as Columbia place the most emphasis on work experience? My friend and I are both in our last year of undergraduate studies in the UK and we both got offers for Chicago!
I thought that schools such as Columbia place the most emphasis on work experience? My friend and I are both in our last year of undergraduate studies in the UK and we both got offers for Chicago!
quote
Here is what we say about this on the Chicago LLM webpage:

We say in our application materials that admission decisions take into account a candidates academic and professional background. In situations where we are considering applicants who are currently in school or are recent graduates, there understandably may not be much of a professional career to consider. Our faculty often say that they appreciate the perspective that experienced lawyers can bring to the discussions in their classes. As a consequence, our Graduate Studies Committee tends to favor candidates who have been working for a while before they come to Chicago. This factor will be balanced with our desire to have a variety of countries represented in the class. For example, there are certain countries in Europe where most of our applicants do not have extensive work experience so that becomes less important to us. As a general proposition, it is fair to say that the Graduate Studies Committee prefers experienced applicants from a country if they are available in the applicant pool.

Richard Badger
Here is what we say about this on the Chicago LLM webpage:

We say in our application materials that admission decisions take into account a candidate’s academic and professional background. In situations where we are considering applicants who are currently in school or are recent graduates, there understandably may not be much of a professional career to consider. Our faculty often say that they appreciate the perspective that experienced lawyers can bring to the discussions in their classes. As a consequence, our Graduate Studies Committee tends to favor candidates who have been working for a while before they come to Chicago. This factor will be balanced with our desire to have a variety of countries represented in the class. For example, there are certain countries in Europe where most of our applicants do not have extensive work experience so that becomes less important to us. As a general proposition, it is fair to say that the Graduate Studies Committee prefers experienced applicants from a country if they are available in the applicant pool.

Richard Badger
quote
llm16
Got the letter! Congratulations to all those who got in! =D

TBH I am somewhat baffled with the decisions.. didn't fancy my chances alot but was hopeful.. & a colleague who I'm certain will be a very strong contender even at Harvard didn't make the cut.. I wonder if schools sometimes look over candidates they feel are likely to reject the offer?

@imnc - a friend of mine is waitlisted, but has no plans to wait.. common wisdom suggests that chances of acceptance are low & unpredictable, and a decision is likely to reach extremely late by default ruling out scholarship

=> I am curious - how many offers does a school make to fill 70 seats? Would Chicago have indeed made only 70 offers & put say 150 on waitlist?
Got the letter! Congratulations to all those who got in! =D

TBH I am somewhat baffled with the decisions.. didn't fancy my chances alot but was hopeful.. & a colleague who I'm certain will be a very strong contender even at Harvard didn't make the cut.. I wonder if schools sometimes look over candidates they feel are likely to reject the offer?

@imnc - a friend of mine is waitlisted, but has no plans to wait.. common wisdom suggests that chances of acceptance are low & unpredictable, and a decision is likely to reach extremely late by default ruling out scholarship

=> I am curious - how many offers does a school make to fill 70 seats? Would Chicago have indeed made only 70 offers & put say 150 on waitlist?
quote
imnc
Got the email from Richard that I am under standby group. Congratulations to those who get an offer!


Good news for you too...the standby group in Chicago must be the group with the most optimistic chances, after the wait list for Cambridge.


Why is that? I am under the impression that waitlist in Chicago basically denotes rej...


Because close to 90% of those with confirmed offers will leave for HYSC, some even for NYU. Or they might have given 3x offers in the knowledge that most will turn it down.

Anyway all this speculation about work experience is just a myth. All the top law schools give the impression they value work exp. but I personally am aware of exceptions in each of them where offers were made to applicants without any.
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>Got the email from Richard that I am under standby group. Congratulations to those who get an offer!</blockquote>

Good news for you too...the standby group in Chicago must be the group with the most optimistic chances, after the wait list for Cambridge. </blockquote>

Why is that? I am under the impression that waitlist in Chicago basically denotes rej...</blockquote>

Because close to 90% of those with confirmed offers will leave for HYSC, some even for NYU. Or they might have given 3x offers in the knowledge that most will turn it down.

Anyway all this speculation about work experience is just a myth. All the top law schools give the impression they value work exp. but I personally am aware of exceptions in each of them where offers were made to applicants without any.

quote
imnc

@imnc - a friend of mine is waitlisted, but has no plans to wait.. common wisdom suggests that chances of acceptance are low & unpredictable, and a decision is likely to reach extremely late by default ruling out scholarship

=> I am curious - how many offers does a school make to fill 70 seats? Would Chicago have indeed made only 70 offers & put say 150 on waitlist?


While logic suggests UChicago makes about 80 offers or so the truth is that most will end up getting offers from more prestigious places and turn it down...so it is possible, like Cambridge, that UC makes about 200 offers.

Personally I feel UC has no particularly reason to attract applicants who have a choice of the ivies or NYU, Georgetown, Michigan on the east coast or UCB,Stanford on the west coast. There is a large cult built around the Chicago school of economics but the law faculty itself has no special significance. The only presence of Judge Posner and Easterbrook on the circuit is not sufficient reason to go to Chicago. I think they do a good job with the hype around 'small class size' but almost everyone I know who had the chance to go to Chicago turned it down.
<blockquote>
@imnc - a friend of mine is waitlisted, but has no plans to wait.. common wisdom suggests that chances of acceptance are low & unpredictable, and a decision is likely to reach extremely late by default ruling out scholarship

=> I am curious - how many offers does a school make to fill 70 seats? Would Chicago have indeed made only 70 offers & put say 150 on waitlist?</blockquote>

While logic suggests UChicago makes about 80 offers or so the truth is that most will end up getting offers from more prestigious places and turn it down...so it is possible, like Cambridge, that UC makes about 200 offers.

Personally I feel UC has no particularly reason to attract applicants who have a choice of the ivies or NYU, Georgetown, Michigan on the east coast or UCB,Stanford on the west coast. There is a large cult built around the Chicago school of economics but the law faculty itself has no special significance. The only presence of Judge Posner and Easterbrook on the circuit is not sufficient reason to go to Chicago. I think they do a good job with the hype around 'small class size' but almost everyone I know who had the chance to go to Chicago turned it down.
quote
llm16
@imnc - Thanks, interesting points there.

After speaking to past year students & applicants, my vague gues-stimate is that UChicago makes around 280 offers & places 150 on WL. It would make sense to make offers to 4x students in the first instance rather than risk relying on WL students to confirm in April/ May.

I think its odd they don't willingly share number of offers made the same way they do for JD applications, especially when UChicago stresses on a transparent process.

Personally, I have an offer from CLS which I'm more inclined towards atm. Would you say making it to UC (ie, being amongst top 280 or so candidates) may be a reasonably good yardstick to blindly guess whether one will make it to HLS?
@imnc - Thanks, interesting points there.

After speaking to past year students & applicants, my vague gues-stimate is that UChicago makes around 280 offers & places 150 on WL. It would make sense to make offers to 4x students in the first instance rather than risk relying on WL students to confirm in April/ May.

I think its odd they don't willingly share number of offers made the same way they do for JD applications, especially when UChicago stresses on a transparent process.

Personally, I have an offer from CLS which I'm more inclined towards atm. Would you say making it to UC (ie, being amongst top 280 or so candidates) may be a reasonably good yardstick to blindly guess whether one will make it to HLS?
quote
Hi guys. Just one thing. While I was accepted in Columbia, NYU and Georgetown (just to mention some of the schools you mentioned in your post, including an "ivy"), i was waitlisted in U.Chicago. It shows you that sometimes entering an Ivy is easier than U.Chicago (btw, U.Chicago and Columbia are exactly in the same raking of Law Schools around the world). I was about to go Columbia (which I agree with you it could be more attractive than NYU or Georgetown), but fortunatelly in the second half of April I received the acceptance from U.Chicago. It was a difficult decision since, among other things, I received a good schoolarship from one of the other schools I was accepeted, but finally I decided to come U.Chicago. The only thing I can tell you guys, is that it was the best decision of my life! In terms for the Program: (i) The economic approach is in everwhere, not only in classes with Judges Posner and Easterbrook, but in all the classes; (ii) The amount of the Program (only 70 people, comparing with Columbia for instance that has 250 people) is the best. Not that small, not that big. I can certainly say that I am very close friend of at least 85% of my classmates, which I´m sure it could not happen in bigger Programs. Here the "network" things is reached with actual friendship and not witg fake things; (iii) The environment itself is amazing, the Campus is an actual Camps; the JD´s are great (not as I heard from other schools); etc. In terms of the city, at the begining I thought NYC was super atractive, actually the city of Chicago was not in my radar. However, once i moved here (also having been in NYC) I can say Chicago is one of the best city to live as an student. In my view is a small, clean and organized NYC. And even NYC people agrees with me on that. It´s an amazing city, there are many things to do. Do an appropriate research and you will understand me. Im sure this is the best experience of my lyfe by far. Even if I am going to work for a while in NYC, now I really don´t want to move out of Chicago. If you were rejected, obviously look at your other acceptances, but if you were wailisted, fight for getting the acceptance. It worths it. And if you were accepted, don´t think about it! Pablo Mori Bregante, from Peru. If you guys have some doubt don´t hesitate to write me: pmoribregante@uchicago.edu.


blockquote>

@imnc - a friend of mine is waitlisted, but has no plans to wait.. common wisdom suggests that chances of acceptance are low & unpredictable, and a decision is likely to reach extremely late by default ruling out scholarship

=> I am curious - how many offers does a school make to fill 70 seats? Would Chicago have indeed made only 70 offers & put say 150 on waitlist?


While logic suggests UChicago makes about 80 offers or so the truth is that most will end up getting offers from more prestigious places and turn it down...so it is possible, like Cambridge, that UC makes about 200 offers.

Personally I feel UC has no particularly reason to attract applicants who have a choice of the ivies or NYU, Georgetown, Michigan on the east coast or UCB,Stanford on the west coast. There is a large cult built around the Chicago school of economics but the law faculty itself has no special significance. The only presence of Judge Posner and Easterbrook on the circuit is not sufficient reason to go to Chicago. I think they do a good job with the hype around 'small class size' but almost everyone I know who had the chance to go to Chicago turned it down.
Hi guys. Just one thing. While I was accepted in Columbia, NYU and Georgetown (just to mention some of the schools you mentioned in your post, including an "ivy"), i was waitlisted in U.Chicago. It shows you that sometimes entering an Ivy is easier than U.Chicago (btw, U.Chicago and Columbia are exactly in the same raking of Law Schools around the world). I was about to go Columbia (which I agree with you it could be more attractive than NYU or Georgetown), but fortunatelly in the second half of April I received the acceptance from U.Chicago. It was a difficult decision since, among other things, I received a good schoolarship from one of the other schools I was accepeted, but finally I decided to come U.Chicago. The only thing I can tell you guys, is that it was the best decision of my life! In terms for the Program: (i) The economic approach is in everwhere, not only in classes with Judges Posner and Easterbrook, but in all the classes; (ii) The amount of the Program (only 70 people, comparing with Columbia for instance that has 250 people) is the best. Not that small, not that big. I can certainly say that I am very close friend of at least 85% of my classmates, which I´m sure it could not happen in bigger Programs. Here the "network" things is reached with actual friendship and not witg fake things; (iii) The environment itself is amazing, the Campus is an actual Camps; the JD´s are great (not as I heard from other schools); etc. In terms of the city, at the begining I thought NYC was super atractive, actually the city of Chicago was not in my radar. However, once i moved here (also having been in NYC) I can say Chicago is one of the best city to live as an student. In my view is a small, clean and organized NYC. And even NYC people agrees with me on that. It´s an amazing city, there are many things to do. Do an appropriate research and you will understand me. Im sure this is the best experience of my lyfe by far. Even if I am going to work for a while in NYC, now I really don´t want to move out of Chicago. If you were rejected, obviously look at your other acceptances, but if you were wailisted, fight for getting the acceptance. It worths it. And if you were accepted, don´t think about it! Pablo Mori Bregante, from Peru. If you guys have some doubt don´t hesitate to write me: pmoribregante@uchicago.edu.


blockquote><blockquote>
@imnc - a friend of mine is waitlisted, but has no plans to wait.. common wisdom suggests that chances of acceptance are low & unpredictable, and a decision is likely to reach extremely late by default ruling out scholarship

=> I am curious - how many offers does a school make to fill 70 seats? Would Chicago have indeed made only 70 offers & put say 150 on waitlist?</blockquote>

While logic suggests UChicago makes about 80 offers or so the truth is that most will end up getting offers from more prestigious places and turn it down...so it is possible, like Cambridge, that UC makes about 200 offers.

Personally I feel UC has no particularly reason to attract applicants who have a choice of the ivies or NYU, Georgetown, Michigan on the east coast or UCB,Stanford on the west coast. There is a large cult built around the Chicago school of economics but the law faculty itself has no special significance. The only presence of Judge Posner and Easterbrook on the circuit is not sufficient reason to go to Chicago. I think they do a good job with the hype around 'small class size' but almost everyone I know who had the chance to go to Chicago turned it down. </blockquote>
quote
llm16
@ pmoribregante - thanks!

Is it possible in any way for you to confirm how many offers UChicago makes to fill the 70 seats & how many it puts on the WL?
@ pmoribregante - thanks!

Is it possible in any way for you to confirm how many offers UChicago makes to fill the 70 seats & how many it puts on the WL?
quote
Hi. Not really. I´m not part of the Acceptance team, just an student. I don´t know neither how many offers the other schools send though. All the best.
Hi. Not really. I´m not part of the Acceptance team, just an student. I don´t know neither how many offers the other schools send though. All the best.
quote
imnc
As someone who was accepted at Harvard, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, NYU, UChicago and chose to go to Columbia thanks to the generous financial aid they gave, here are my replies to your very patriotic post.

i was waitlisted in U.Chicago. It shows you that sometimes entering an Ivy is easier than U.Chicago

That 'Sometimes' is about 1% of the time. I think it is fair to say that most acceptances from UnivChicago get accepted to the ivies. The fact that we have to look hard to find exceptions validates my point. Here there are at least 20 people I have personally met who also had offers by UChicago. I also frequently go to Harvard Law to meet a friend who is there this year in the LLM program and she says the same about HLS.

The amount of the Program (only 70 people, comparing with Columbia for instance that has 250 people) is the best

I agree that the columbia class size is too large. But beyond the perception of 'less exclusive' the larger class size does not make much difference in everyday life because there are a correspondingly large number of courses and LLMs get scattered throughout these. I have a small group of 20-30 friends and maybe a larger group of acquaintances and that's ok for me. The large class size is beneficial because alumni networks tend to be larger and present in every law firm / org in numbers so the odds of meeting an alumni are high if you are from Columbia or Harvard.

To go to Chicago for the exclusivity is a bad reason. If that was a big issue Chicago would be the No.1 in law schools.

The environment itself is amazing, the Campus is an actual Camps; the JD´s are great (not as I heard from other schools); etc. In terms of the city, at the begining I thought NYC was super atractive, actually the city of Chicago was not in my radar. However, once i moved here (also having been in NYC) I can say Chicago is one of the best city to live as an student. In my view is a small, clean and organized NYC. And even NYC people agrees with me on that.

At this level, all top law schools have great campuses and environments. I would have preferred a quieter town than New York but having said that New York is way ahead of Chicago in almost every respect - transport, crime, facilities, entertainment, climate and proximity to the jobs / UN. My personal belief is that nobody should choose a law school based on location but if they do CLS and NYU have the best location in the world.
As someone who was accepted at Harvard, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, NYU, UChicago and chose to go to Columbia thanks to the generous financial aid they gave, here are my replies to your very patriotic post.

<blockquote>i was waitlisted in U.Chicago. It shows you that sometimes entering an Ivy is easier than U.Chicago</blockquote>
That 'Sometimes' is about 1% of the time. I think it is fair to say that most acceptances from UnivChicago get accepted to the ivies. The fact that we have to look hard to find exceptions validates my point. Here there are at least 20 people I have personally met who also had offers by UChicago. I also frequently go to Harvard Law to meet a friend who is there this year in the LLM program and she says the same about HLS.

<blockquote> The amount of the Program (only 70 people, comparing with Columbia for instance that has 250 people) is the best</blockquote>
I agree that the columbia class size is too large. But beyond the perception of 'less exclusive' the larger class size does not make much difference in everyday life because there are a correspondingly large number of courses and LLMs get scattered throughout these. I have a small group of 20-30 friends and maybe a larger group of acquaintances and that's ok for me. The large class size is beneficial because alumni networks tend to be larger and present in every law firm / org in numbers so the odds of meeting an alumni are high if you are from Columbia or Harvard.

To go to Chicago for the exclusivity is a bad reason. If that was a big issue Chicago would be the No.1 in law schools.

<blockquote> The environment itself is amazing, the Campus is an actual Camps; the JD´s are great (not as I heard from other schools); etc. In terms of the city, at the begining I thought NYC was super atractive, actually the city of Chicago was not in my radar. However, once i moved here (also having been in NYC) I can say Chicago is one of the best city to live as an student. In my view is a small, clean and organized NYC. And even NYC people agrees with me on that. </blockquote>
At this level, all top law schools have great campuses and environments. I would have preferred a quieter town than New York but having said that New York is way ahead of Chicago in almost every respect - transport, crime, facilities, entertainment, climate and proximity to the jobs / UN. My personal belief is that nobody should choose a law school based on location but if they do CLS and NYU have the best location in the world.
quote
imnc
@imnc - Thanks, interesting points there.

After speaking to past year students & applicants, my vague gues-stimate is that UChicago makes around 280 offers & places 150 on WL. It would make sense to make offers to 4x students in the first instance rather than risk relying on WL students to confirm in April/ May.

I think its odd they don't willingly share number of offers made the same way they do for JD applications, especially when UChicago stresses on a transparent process.

Personally, I have an offer from CLS which I'm more inclined towards atm. Would you say making it to UC (ie, being amongst top 280 or so candidates) may be a reasonably good yardstick to blindly guess whether one will make it to HLS?


U Chicago has a disproportionate amount of prestige within the JD ranks, not so the LLM program. Disclosing the stats might show that the LLM program was not the most sought after. But I can tell you this. Last year when I applied, Chicago informed me that they had received 940 applications whereas HLS and CLS both received about 1800/1900 applications for the LLM program.

In general making it to CLS is a good indicator that your app is strong and you have a good chance at Harvard. A UC acceptance is not very helpful as many others would have got it.
<blockquote>@imnc - Thanks, interesting points there.

After speaking to past year students & applicants, my vague gues-stimate is that UChicago makes around 280 offers & places 150 on WL. It would make sense to make offers to 4x students in the first instance rather than risk relying on WL students to confirm in April/ May.

I think its odd they don't willingly share number of offers made the same way they do for JD applications, especially when UChicago stresses on a transparent process.

Personally, I have an offer from CLS which I'm more inclined towards atm. Would you say making it to UC (ie, being amongst top 280 or so candidates) may be a reasonably good yardstick to blindly guess whether one will make it to HLS?</blockquote>

U Chicago has a disproportionate amount of prestige within the JD ranks, not so the LLM program. Disclosing the stats might show that the LLM program was not the most sought after. But I can tell you this. Last year when I applied, Chicago informed me that they had received 940 applications whereas HLS and CLS both received about 1800/1900 applications for the LLM program.

In general making it to CLS is a good indicator that your app is strong and you have a good chance at Harvard. A UC acceptance is not very helpful as many others would have got it.
quote

U Chicago has a disproportionate amount of prestige within the JD ranks, not so the LLM program. Disclosing the stats might show that the LLM program was not the most sought after. But I can tell you this. Last year when I applied, Chicago informed me that they had received 940 applications whereas HLS and CLS both received about 1800/1900 applications for the LLM program.

In general making it to CLS is a good indicator that your app is strong and you have a good chance at Harvard. A UC acceptance is not very helpful as many others would have got it.


How can you make the conclusion that an offer from CLS gives you better chances to get to HLS? Every committee has their own understanding of an ideal candidate from a particular country; it is not only (I would say, almost never) about your grades and work in an ILF.

After all, even taking your stats, you may easily infer that UoC has competition of 12.5 persons/place (class of 75 LLMs), HLS - 12 persons/place (class of 150 LLMs) and CLS - 7.6 persons/place (class of 250 LLMs). So, statistically speaking, it is harder to get to the UoC than anywhere else.

I am not aware of the number of applicants to the NYU, but, considering the class of 400 LLMs, I am sure that the numbers are even lower than for CLS. So, my point is that your acceptance to any of these places says nothing on your chances to get anywhere else.
<blockquote>
U Chicago has a disproportionate amount of prestige within the JD ranks, not so the LLM program. Disclosing the stats might show that the LLM program was not the most sought after. But I can tell you this. Last year when I applied, Chicago informed me that they had received 940 applications whereas HLS and CLS both received about 1800/1900 applications for the LLM program.

In general making it to CLS is a good indicator that your app is strong and you have a good chance at Harvard. A UC acceptance is not very helpful as many others would have got it. </blockquote>

How can you make the conclusion that an offer from CLS gives you better chances to get to HLS? Every committee has their own understanding of an ideal candidate from a particular country; it is not only (I would say, almost never) about your grades and work in an ILF.

After all, even taking your stats, you may easily infer that UoC has competition of 12.5 persons/place (class of 75 LLMs), HLS - 12 persons/place (class of 150 LLMs) and CLS - 7.6 persons/place (class of 250 LLMs). So, statistically speaking, it is harder to get to the UoC than anywhere else.

I am not aware of the number of applicants to the NYU, but, considering the class of 400 LLMs, I am sure that the numbers are even lower than for CLS. So, my point is that your acceptance to any of these places says nothing on your chances to get anywhere else.
quote
llm16
@Chuck_and_Geck - thanks. Yes, you do have a point.

However, this is where I have an issue with the schools for not themselves providing adequate information which they could (and should, since they do so for JDs).

Picture this:

- UChicago may actually be making offers to 280 or 300 students to fill those 70 seats (because acceptance rate of UC offers, by all indicators, seems to be quite low).

Thus, acceptance rate of applicants 'could' then be as high as 30%!

- HLS, despite more seats (150 or so), may be making offers to only 225 students (because candidates may be less likely to reject the offers).

Thus, acceptance rate 'could' be as low as 15%..

TBH, I'm disappointed that schools want us to think they are more 'exclusive' by advertising a small class size, & calculating acceptance rates based on:
= [ intake ] / [ # of applicants ]

while it really should be:
= [ # of offers ] / [ # of applicants ]

What is worse is that they are aware of this hypocrisy, since they provide that information for JD admissions. My estimate is that UoC may be only slightly more selective than CLS, but may have a higher acceptance rate than HYS, and even UPenn, UCB, etc.
@Chuck_and_Geck - thanks. Yes, you do have a point.

However, this is where I have an issue with the schools for not themselves providing adequate information which they could (and should, since they do so for JDs).

Picture this:

- UChicago may actually be making offers to 280 or 300 students to fill those 70 seats (because acceptance rate of UC offers, by all indicators, seems to be quite low).

Thus, acceptance rate of applicants 'could' then be as high as 30%!

- HLS, despite more seats (150 or so), may be making offers to only 225 students (because candidates may be less likely to reject the offers).

Thus, acceptance rate 'could' be as low as 15%..

TBH, I'm disappointed that schools want us to think they are more 'exclusive' by advertising a small class size, & calculating acceptance rates based on:
= [ intake ] / [ # of applicants ]

while it really should be:
= [ # of offers ] / [ # of applicants ]

What is worse is that they are aware of this hypocrisy, since they provide that information for JD admissions. My estimate is that UoC may be only slightly more selective than CLS, but may have a higher acceptance rate than HYS, and even UPenn, UCB, etc.
quote
Agree, but so far this is just a speculation over figures, I wouldn't be obsessed with it.

Everyone needs to choose the Uni based on its academic / extra-curriculum preferences. As this is a UoC topic, I must say that the Uni is particularly strong in economic approach / antitrust (5 different classes in 2015/16) / Securities regulation (Henderson is one of the best in this field) / ConLaw (Geoffrey Stone!!) / Philosophy (Nussbaum!!). Basically, the offerings and schedules are available on their web-site. One may check and decide for himself whether she belongs to this place or not.

Good luck!
Agree, but so far this is just a speculation over figures, I wouldn't be obsessed with it.

Everyone needs to choose the Uni based on its academic / extra-curriculum preferences. As this is a UoC topic, I must say that the Uni is particularly strong in economic approach / antitrust (5 different classes in 2015/16) / Securities regulation (Henderson is one of the best in this field) / ConLaw (Geoffrey Stone!!) / Philosophy (Nussbaum!!). Basically, the offerings and schedules are available on their web-site. One may check and decide for himself whether she belongs to this place or not.

Good luck!
quote
llm16
Speculation is all there is while we wait for decisions from other schools! =)

Questioning the authenticity of the selective nature of the highest ranked law schools (especially when many of us will be incurring copious amount of debt to attend & making huge life-impacting decisions) is an extremely pertinent enquiry IMHO. There is every reason to believe that a law school which is harder to get admitted to attracts more prestige; and several schools enjoy that prestige basis the small class-sizes they maintain. This I increasingly believe is a misleading yet widely prevalent assumption, & I only express my disappointment at lack of full disclosure of # of offers.

Participants on this thread are those who have already willingly selected UoC as a probably school, including for reasons listed by you.

Good luck =)
Speculation is all there is while we wait for decisions from other schools! =)

Questioning the authenticity of the selective nature of the highest ranked law schools (especially when many of us will be incurring copious amount of debt to attend & making huge life-impacting decisions) is an extremely pertinent enquiry IMHO. There is every reason to believe that a law school which is harder to get admitted to attracts more prestige; and several schools enjoy that prestige basis the small class-sizes they maintain. This I increasingly believe is a misleading yet widely prevalent assumption, & I only express my disappointment at lack of full disclosure of # of offers.

Participants on this thread are those who have already willingly selected UoC as a probably school, including for reasons listed by you.

Good luck =)
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imnc
Let me clarify my earlier post.

All the top schools look for similar CVs. Top grades, good writing, referees, prior jobs, etc. Getting an offer from one is usually a sign that your chances are good at the rest, or at least better than a situation where you did not* getting that offer. Thus it can be concluded that someone who has offers from CLS + UChicgo stands a good chance of getting Harvard.

Speaking of the strengths of the law faculty at Chicago, they have 2-3 really good courses as you mention but their constitutional law faculty is (like CLS) poor and their corporate law faculty (unlike CLS) is also bad. I have no interest in constitutional law otherwise I would have gone to Harvard which has the best constitutional law faculty and the number of courses. Chicago (from my last year research) has less variety and depth of courses than Harvard, Yale and Columbia (and even NYU). Even if you are into anti-trust law or economics going to Chicago is a steep tradeoff in terms of prestige and location and other courses that you miss and I get the impression those in Chicago cling desperately to this 'small class' and 'economics' labels to feel good about themselves.
Let me clarify my earlier post.

All the top schools look for similar CVs. Top grades, good writing, referees, prior jobs, etc. Getting an offer from one is usually a sign that your chances are good at the rest, or at least better than a situation where you did not* getting that offer. Thus it can be concluded that someone who has offers from CLS + UChicgo stands a good chance of getting Harvard.

Speaking of the strengths of the law faculty at Chicago, they have 2-3 really good courses as you mention but their constitutional law faculty is (like CLS) poor and their corporate law faculty (unlike CLS) is also bad. I have no interest in constitutional law otherwise I would have gone to Harvard which has the best constitutional law faculty and the number of courses. Chicago (from my last year research) has less variety and depth of courses than Harvard, Yale and Columbia (and even NYU). Even if you are into anti-trust law or economics going to Chicago is a steep tradeoff in terms of prestige and location and other courses that you miss and I get the impression those in Chicago cling desperately to this 'small class' and 'economics' labels to feel good about themselves.
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