Chances of Admission at T14


DanT99
Hi, I was just wondering if I had any shot at getting into the school I applied for. I applied for every T14 from Chicago to Georgetown, excluding Columbia. I also applied to UCLA. I am graduating next year from University of Kent in England - middle ranked university with a decent law program, nothing amazing. I have had a strong 2:1 average in first and second year (65) and am on track to finish third year with a high 2:1 or First, 69-70. Leaving me with an overall average of about 67-68, high 2:1, which I think translates to about a 3.5-3.6 GPA. I have had some summer work experience at a law firm and I also did a year abroad studying in Japan at a top university there with my transcript in Japan grades as “superior” by LSAC. LSAC gave my Kent marks so far “Above Average”.

Do I have a chance at any of the T14?
Hi, I was just wondering if I had any shot at getting into the school I applied for. I applied for every T14 from Chicago to Georgetown, excluding Columbia. I also applied to UCLA. I am graduating next year from University of Kent in England - middle ranked university with a decent law program, nothing amazing. I have had a strong 2:1 average in first and second year (65) and am on track to finish third year with a high 2:1 or First, 69-70. Leaving me with an overall average of about 67-68, high 2:1, which I think translates to about a 3.5-3.6 GPA. I have had some summer work experience at a law firm and I also did a year abroad studying in Japan at a top university there with my transcript in Japan grades as “superior” by LSAC. LSAC gave my Kent marks so far “Above Average”.

Do I have a chance at any of the T14?
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#
Hi — I think so, but it will also depend of your nationality's applicant pool (See more explanations here: https://llm-guide.com/board/usa/fresh-law-grad-applying-for-t14-llm-223981#post-id-223982). One good way to compare yourself is to use this website's tracker and have a look on the previous years admission/rejection results.

In addition, you could also apply to few others T20 law schools (like USC Gould, etc.) in order to probably get some scholarship offers and use them as negotiation leverage.

[Edited by # on Dec 20, 2019]

Hi — I think so, but it will also depend of your nationality's applicant pool (See more explanations here: https://llm-guide.com/board/usa/fresh-law-grad-applying-for-t14-llm-223981#post-id-223982). One good way to compare yourself is to use this website's tracker and have a look on the previous years admission/rejection results.

In addition, you could also apply to few others T20 law schools (like USC Gould, etc.) in order to probably get some scholarship offers and use them as negotiation leverage.
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DanT99
I’m studying and living in England but I have Canadian nationality, are there a lot of Canadian or British students applying for US LLMs?
I’m studying and living in England but I have Canadian nationality, are there a lot of Canadian or British students applying for US LLMs?

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#
To my knowledge, the British and Canadian's applicant pools should be fairly small (maybe the smallest) because :
- As their legal studies are based on English common law they don't need to do an US LLM in order to sit the New York bar exam (See Rule §520.6(b)(1)(i)(b) Substantive requirements of the NY Court of Appeals, https://www.nybarexam.org/Rules/Rules.htm#520.6); and
- Many Canadian and British applicants do their studies in USA (like you in the UK) and so will probably do a JD instead of a LLM.

By the way, many law schools are looking for applicants with 2+ years of legal experience. However, because your group should not be very competitive this requirement should not be a blocking point.

Good luck!

[Edited by # on Dec 20, 2019]

To my knowledge, the British and Canadian's applicant pools should be fairly small (maybe the smallest) because :
- As their legal studies are based on English common law they don't need to do an US LLM in order to sit the New York bar exam (See [i][u]Rule §520.6(b)(1)(i)(b) Substantive requirements of the NY Court of Appeals[/u][/i], https://www.nybarexam.org/Rules/Rules.htm#520.6); and
- Many Canadian and British applicants do their studies in USA (like you in the UK) and so will probably do a JD instead of a LLM.

By the way, many law schools are looking for applicants with 2+ years of legal experience. However, because your group should not be very competitive this requirement should not be a blocking point.

Good luck!
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KL2019
I have similar doubts. I am applying to most T14s. I graduated from one the top universities in my country but with a rather mediocre GPA (2:2 equivalent). Nonetheless, i have over 5 years of experience in a big law firm and was ranked by Who'sWho Legal at a very young age (26). I have also half a dozen publications and have participated in moot competitions, as well as other academic activities, such as law journal editing and academic associations. My question is: could that be taken into consideration to counter my not-so-great grades?
I have similar doubts. I am applying to most T14s. I graduated from one the top universities in my country but with a rather mediocre GPA (2:2 equivalent). Nonetheless, i have over 5 years of experience in a big law firm and was ranked by Who'sWho Legal at a very young age (26). I have also half a dozen publications and have participated in moot competitions, as well as other academic activities, such as law journal editing and academic associations. My question is: could that be taken into consideration to counter my not-so-great grades?
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#
My question is: could that be taken into consideration to counter my not-so-great grades?
Definitely because it's an holistic review. It means that they will take everything into consideration.

So, if one of the requirements is below the expectations (i.e. low GPA, low TOEFL score, no work experience, etc.) it can be bypassed by the other requirements which are as of interest.

Therefore:
- 5y of work experience is a strong asset because most of the people usually have only between 0-2y.
- The big law experience is usually another good point for your application.
- The publication is another good asset, and US law schools love this kind of specific skill.
- About the Who'sWho Legal ranking, I don't know if it will help your application a lot, but at least it's still a plus.

[Edited by # on Dec 30, 2019]

[quote]My question is: could that be taken into consideration to counter my not-so-great grades?[/quote]Definitely because it's an holistic review. It means that they will take everything into consideration.

So, if one of the requirements is below the expectations (i.e. low GPA, low TOEFL score, no work experience, etc.) it can be bypassed by the other requirements which are as of interest.

Therefore:
- 5y of work experience is a strong asset because most of the people usually have only between 0-2y.
- The big law experience is usually another good point for your application.
- The publication is another good asset, and US law schools love this kind of specific skill.
- About the Who'sWho Legal ranking, I don't know if it will help your application a lot, but at least it's still a plus.
quote

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