Requirements of an LLM degree; a non-qualifying law degree?


Hey. I'm currently in my 3rd year of my LLB and wish to do my LLM, next year. The problem is that I am unable to attain a qualifying law degree, so will I still be able to do the LLM? Even if I attain a 2:2?

Also, I'm not seeking to do the LPC. I want to go in to teaching law, at either college or universities. Can someone offer me advice on what I need to do for this and whether an LLM will help me reach to this point, considering that I don't have a qualifying law degree?

Thanks!
Hey. I'm currently in my 3rd year of my LLB and wish to do my LLM, next year. The problem is that I am unable to attain a qualifying law degree, so will I still be able to do the LLM? Even if I attain a 2:2?

Also, I'm not seeking to do the LPC. I want to go in to teaching law, at either college or universities. Can someone offer me advice on what I need to do for this and whether an LLM will help me reach to this point, considering that I don't have a qualifying law degree?

Thanks!
quote
upnorth
Surely an LLB is a qualifying law degree?
Surely an LLB is a qualifying law degree?
quote
lmwoods
Whether or not you have a qualifying law degree depends on the subjects you pass while at university. An LLB need not then be a qualifying law degree. It is not necessary to have a qualifying law degree to undertake an LLM; some institutions allow applications from people without any law degree at all (depending on the nature of and LLM and/or the nature of the applicant's background and degree). Most masters degrees that I know of state that a 2,1 or equivalent is required rather than a 2,2 - though a lot of institutions look at borderline cases (exit velocity; particular strength in relevant subject extenuating circumstances). I think you would now have to be lucky to get an academic job with just an LLM; there has been a move to expecting applicants to have a PhD or LLM plus considerable work experience.
Whether or not you have a qualifying law degree depends on the subjects you pass while at university. An LLB need not then be a qualifying law degree. It is not necessary to have a qualifying law degree to undertake an LLM; some institutions allow applications from people without any law degree at all (depending on the nature of and LLM and/or the nature of the applicant's background and degree). Most masters degrees that I know of state that a 2,1 or equivalent is required rather than a 2,2 - though a lot of institutions look at borderline cases (exit velocity; particular strength in relevant subject extenuating circumstances). I think you would now have to be lucky to get an academic job with just an LLM; there has been a move to expecting applicants to have a PhD or LLM plus considerable work experience.
quote
S_Dimelow
I'd agree with what has been said so far and add the only alternative would be if you wanted to teach A level law at college. In a similar vain to the previous post, I'd be surprised if you could get an academic job without a PHD and PHD places would only (I would guess) go to candidates with 1st and distinction grades (or possibly high 2:1 and distinction I suppose). However, I guess college A level/GCSE teaching might be a bit more lenient and allow a 2:2/low 2:1 candidate to progress to PGCE level etc.
I'd agree with what has been said so far and add the only alternative would be if you wanted to teach A level law at college. In a similar vain to the previous post, I'd be surprised if you could get an academic job without a PHD and PHD places would only (I would guess) go to candidates with 1st and distinction grades (or possibly high 2:1 and distinction I suppose). However, I guess college A level/GCSE teaching might be a bit more lenient and allow a 2:2/low 2:1 candidate to progress to PGCE level etc.
quote

Reply to Post

Hot Discussions