LLM in Commercial Law or In International Trade Law. Is UK the best?


giovane86
Hello,

My cousin would like to apply for an LLM in commercial or international trade law. He is 22 years old and has just graduated from Law school here. As a matter of fact,my cousin is confused about the best place. He wants to study in USA and as far as I know UK is the best place to study that kind of LLM for several reasons. Uk is world's best place for the commercial and international trade law due to its rich history and many trade or commercial resolutions are held in London. Many choose the English law or the English courts as a choice of law or jurisdiction. UK is not a member of CISG 1980. American universities are better at business law. Business law is about Tax and fiscal matters. We need the real deal that DEAL with corporate and maritime . Your opinion matters, please help.
Hello,

My cousin would like to apply for an LLM in commercial or international trade law. He is 22 years old and has just graduated from Law school here. As a matter of fact,my cousin is confused about the best place. He wants to study in USA and as far as I know UK is the best place to study that kind of LLM for several reasons. Uk is world's best place for the commercial and international trade law due to its rich history and many trade or commercial resolutions are held in London. Many choose the English law or the English courts as a choice of law or jurisdiction. UK is not a member of CISG 1980. American universities are better at business law. Business law is about Tax and fiscal matters. We need the real deal that DEAL with corporate and maritime . Your opinion matters, please help.
quote
flori
Hello Giovane,

We need the real deal that DEAL with corporate and maritime . Your opinion matters, please help.


As far as maritime law is concerned, there are actually two real deals:
1. Maritime law with a strong focus on the American law: Forget about any options in the UK -> head straight for Tulane.
2. All other cases: UK (Southampton, Swansea - in alphabetical order)

However, this opinion is limited to maritime law LLM-programs only and is _not_ valid, if your cousin only plans to take maritime law as one module as a part of a more general commercial/ international trade law LLM.

(From my point of the view, a combination of both corporate and maritime law will make sense for only a small minority of the potential students, for the vast majority this combination will be a rather sub-optimal choice having very limited positive consequences regarding future employability.)

Bye
flori
Hello Giovane,

<blockquote>We need the real deal that DEAL with corporate and maritime . Your opinion matters, please help. </blockquote>

As far as maritime law is concerned, there are actually two real deals:
1. Maritime law with a strong focus on the American law: Forget about any options in the UK -> head straight for Tulane.
2. All other cases: UK (Southampton, Swansea - in alphabetical order)

However, this opinion is limited to maritime law LLM-programs only and is _not_ valid, if your cousin only plans to take maritime law as one module as a part of a more general commercial/ international trade law LLM.

(From my point of the view, a combination of both corporate and maritime law will make sense for only a small minority of the potential students, for the vast majority this combination will be a rather sub-optimal choice having very limited positive consequences regarding future employability.)

Bye
flori
quote
kosta
Hello Giovane,

We need the real deal that DEAL with corporate and maritime . Your opinion matters, please help.


As far as maritime law is concerned, there are actually two real deals:
1. Maritime law with a strong focus on the American law: Forget about any options in the UK -> head straight for Tulane.
2. All other cases: UK (Southampton, Swansea - in alphabetical order)

However, this opinion is limited to maritime law LLM-programs only and is _not_ valid, if your cousin only plans to take maritime law as one module as a part of a more general commercial/ international trade law LLM.

(From my point of the view, a combination of both corporate and maritime law will make sense for only a small minority of the potential students, for the vast majority this combination will be a rather sub-optimal choice having very limited positive consequences regarding future employability.)

Bye
flori

Tulane is good I agree but they only teach American law. English law is predominant though as the majority of the contracts are subject to English law. So it is good only if you want to stay in the US, where is very difficult though to find a job due to strict visa restrictions.
<blockquote>Hello Giovane,

<blockquote>We need the real deal that DEAL with corporate and maritime . Your opinion matters, please help. </blockquote>

As far as maritime law is concerned, there are actually two real deals:
1. Maritime law with a strong focus on the American law: Forget about any options in the UK -> head straight for Tulane.
2. All other cases: UK (Southampton, Swansea - in alphabetical order)

However, this opinion is limited to maritime law LLM-programs only and is _not_ valid, if your cousin only plans to take maritime law as one module as a part of a more general commercial/ international trade law LLM.

(From my point of the view, a combination of both corporate and maritime law will make sense for only a small minority of the potential students, for the vast majority this combination will be a rather sub-optimal choice having very limited positive consequences regarding future employability.)

Bye
flori
</blockquote>
Tulane is good I agree but they only teach American law. English law is predominant though as the majority of the contracts are subject to English law. So it is good only if you want to stay in the US, where is very difficult though to find a job due to strict visa restrictions.
quote
flori
Well, in the end nobody knows - I have serious doubts whether a Tulane graduate would encounter any serious problems to secure an adequate job. (The visa won't be a problem at all, once a prospective employer is seriously interested in an applicant and yes, prospective employers tend to be extremely interested in Tulane graduates-> this is all hearsay, though. Still, it includes direct hearsay from people who recruit Tulane graduates or graduates who got recruited...)
Well, in the end nobody knows - I have serious doubts whether a Tulane graduate would encounter any serious problems to secure an adequate job. (The visa won't be a problem at all, once a prospective employer is seriously interested in an applicant and yes, prospective employers tend to be extremely interested in Tulane graduates-> this is all hearsay, though. Still, it includes direct hearsay from people who recruit Tulane graduates or graduates who got recruited...)
quote
bmalkawi
Tulane Law School is known for its maritime law, research and faculty members. If you are interested in international trade my advice would be Arizona Law School or American University, Washington DC. Bashar H. Malkawi
Tulane Law School is known for its maritime law, research and faculty members. If you are interested in international trade my advice would be Arizona Law School or American University, Washington DC. Bashar H. Malkawi
quote
kosta
Hi guys

sorry but I completely disagree with Flori! First of all I work in practice and I can assure you that maritime is an international operation- USA is not party to 95 % of international agreements in the field so maritime education in the USA is going to be taught from a national spectrum not from an international prespective! Most of the maritime conventions (Hague, Hague Visby Rules, Salvage Convention, Limitation Conventions, and even Arrest Convention 1952) are based on English law and these are used in most jurisdictions throughout the world! Sorry, I do not want to be political but USA's most recent take on international trade and law is also not very encouraging!
Hi guys

sorry but I completely disagree with Flori! First of all I work in practice and I can assure you that maritime is an international operation- USA is not party to 95 % of international agreements in the field so maritime education in the USA is going to be taught from a national spectrum not from an international prespective! Most of the maritime conventions (Hague, Hague Visby Rules, Salvage Convention, Limitation Conventions, and even Arrest Convention 1952) are based on English law and these are used in most jurisdictions throughout the world! Sorry, I do not want to be political but USA's most recent take on international trade and law is also not very encouraging!
quote

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