LLM European Law without LLB?


dignity
Dear all,

I´d love to add an LLM in European Law to my Bachelor degree in European Studies. However I`ve been wondering, if you know about anyone who got admitted to a LLM without holding a LLB. If yes, at which university?

thanks in advance!
best regards
Dear all,

I´d love to add an LLM in European Law to my Bachelor degree in European Studies. However I`ve been wondering, if you know about anyone who got admitted to a LLM without holding a LLB. If yes, at which university?

thanks in advance!
best regards
quote
lmwoods
You'd have to check with the individual institutions, but I think that provided your grades are good and you have relevant experience then you would be considered nothwithstanding the fact that you don't have an LLB.
You'd have to check with the individual institutions, but I think that provided your grades are good and you have relevant experience then you would be considered nothwithstanding the fact that you don't have an LLB.
quote
littledoll
I agree with the above post. I am not 100% sure but I think that you can do an LLM at Maastricht University after taking an entrance test. Just check their homepage!
I agree with the above post. I am not 100% sure but I think that you can do an LLM at Maastricht University after taking an entrance test. Just check their homepage!
quote
york
This article describes some LLM programs that are open to non-lawyers:

http://www.llm-guide.com/article/213/llm-programs-for-non-law-graduates

Here are some of them:

- University of Nottingham
- Bucerius Law School
- University of Edinburgh
- UoL External Programme
- LSE
- UCL
- EMLE Program
This article describes some LLM programs that are open to non-lawyers:

http://www.llm-guide.com/article/213/llm-programs-for-non-law-graduates

Here are some of them:

- University of Nottingham
- Bucerius Law School
- University of Edinburgh
- UoL External Programme
- LSE
- UCL
- EMLE Program
quote
Edinburgh definitely allows LLM entrance without a prior LLB. The European law programme is one of the oldest LLM programmes at the law school there and it is home to the Europa Institute, the oldest dedicated research centre for European law. You should check it out.
http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/pg/taught/llmeuropeanlaw.aspx
Edinburgh definitely allows LLM entrance without a prior LLB. The European law programme is one of the oldest LLM programmes at the law school there and it is home to the Europa Institute, the oldest dedicated research centre for European law. You should check it out.
http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/pg/taught/llmeuropeanlaw.aspx
quote
I would personally counsel caution here. When I see LLM applications from students without a law degree I usually interrogate them as to how much law they have actually studied during their previous degrees.
European Union Law requires a significant understanding of technical legal issues, you cannot just get away with looking at broader political issues of 'governance'-you also have to be able to handle the single market acquis and cope with the delphic and extensive case law of the ECJ.
If you have not done much law in your European Studies degree one option would be to consider taking the Common Professional Examination otherwise known as the Graduate Diploma in Law, which involves studying the core subjects of the English LLB degree, before you take the LLM.
I have recommended this course to a number of students who applied to City in the past without law degrees who have gone on to successfully complete the LLM.

Professor Alan Riley
LLM Programme Director
City Law School
City University
Grays Inn Place
London
Electronic Mail: alan.riley.1@city.ac.uk
I would personally counsel caution here. When I see LLM applications from students without a law degree I usually interrogate them as to how much law they have actually studied during their previous degrees.
European Union Law requires a significant understanding of technical legal issues, you cannot just get away with looking at broader political issues of 'governance'-you also have to be able to handle the single market acquis and cope with the delphic and extensive case law of the ECJ.
If you have not done much law in your European Studies degree one option would be to consider taking the Common Professional Examination otherwise known as the Graduate Diploma in Law, which involves studying the core subjects of the English LLB degree, before you take the LLM.
I have recommended this course to a number of students who applied to City in the past without law degrees who have gone on to successfully complete the LLM.

Professor Alan Riley
LLM Programme Director
City Law School
City University
Grays Inn Place
London
Electronic Mail: alan.riley.1@city.ac.uk
quote
dignity
Thank you all so much for your replies!!!

With regard to your post, Professor Riley, I would like to ask, whether you consider 47 ects for (pure) law courses as more or less suffficient for applying for a LLM. In addition I have been working in the European Parliament as a researcher/advisor since 2008, thus I could also obtain some experiences with legal matters there.

I am thankful for your suggestion to take the Common Professional Examination. I`ll definitely consider this option.

Thank you very much again.

Best regards,

Dignity
Thank you all so much for your replies!!!

With regard to your post, Professor Riley, I would like to ask, whether you consider 47 ects for (pure) law courses as more or less suffficient for applying for a LLM. In addition I have been working in the European Parliament as a researcher/advisor since 2008, thus I could also obtain some experiences with legal matters there.

I am thankful for your suggestion to take the Common Professional Examination. I`ll definitely consider this option.

Thank you very much again.

Best regards,

Dignity
quote
Dear Dignity,
Email me for a more extensive response.

What I would say generally is this: Those who have not got a law degree have to be careful. It is possible to find yourself drowning on a LLM course unable to easily adjust the amount of work based around black letter law-no matter how much economic and politics are also integrated into the course. My view is that if you really want to become a lawyer then do a law degree or the one year conversion course and then do the LLM. If you don't want to be a lawyer then you really ought to look carefully at the nature of the Law Masters you are thinking of taking on-and also question how valuable it will be for you.

Professor Alan Riley
LLM Programme Director
City Law School
City University
Grays Inn
London
Electronic Mail: alan.riley.1@city.ac.uk
Dear Dignity,
Email me for a more extensive response.

What I would say generally is this: Those who have not got a law degree have to be careful. It is possible to find yourself drowning on a LLM course unable to easily adjust the amount of work based around black letter law-no matter how much economic and politics are also integrated into the course. My view is that if you really want to become a lawyer then do a law degree or the one year conversion course and then do the LLM. If you don't want to be a lawyer then you really ought to look carefully at the nature of the Law Masters you are thinking of taking on-and also question how valuable it will be for you.

Professor Alan Riley
LLM Programme Director
City Law School
City University
Grays Inn
London
Electronic Mail: alan.riley.1@city.ac.uk
quote
whatelse
Dear Dignity,

with a position in the European Parliament I believe you could do better than City University of London.

Poor lessons were taught all along the LLM course we attended at City and no job perspectives were given to the students once they completed the course.

It was very expensive and badly organised, but worst the lack of connections between work and courses.

For my experience they promised many internships, positions, but only nice words.

If you notice the director of LSE or Queen's Mary or King's college will never contact you with a private email. They don't need it as they don't hunt for $tudent$, it's students looking for them.
It's just a opposite scheme that tells you a lot where you should address your research.

Good luck for your future,

W.E.

(student)
Dear Dignity,

with a position in the European Parliament I believe you could do better than City University of London.

Poor lessons were taught all along the LLM course we attended at City and no job perspectives were given to the students once they completed the course.

It was very expensive and badly organised, but worst the lack of connections between work and courses.

For my experience they promised many internships, positions, but only nice words.

If you notice the director of LSE or Queen's Mary or King's college will never contact you with a private email. They don't need it as they don't hunt for $tudent$, it's students looking for them.
It's just a opposite scheme that tells you a lot where you should address your research.

Good luck for your future,

W.E.

(student)
quote
legalUK
W.E. - are you talking based on our own bad experience? If so, be objective! If LSE, Queen's Mary and King's College do not contact you with a private email that is their customer service.
I work in a top city law firm and the city law school has a very good reputation not only among students but in private practice. Many partners here did their law degree at the City. At the end of the day, it is entirely up to you how well you do in your career and studies!
W.E. - are you talking based on our own bad experience? If so, be objective! If LSE, Queen's Mary and King's College do not contact you with a private email that is their customer service.
I work in a top city law firm and the city law school has a very good reputation not only among students but in private practice. Many partners here did their law degree at the City. At the end of the day, it is entirely up to you how well you do in your career and studies!
quote
My dear whatelse
You fight against the City University. Well not every one can always be satisfied. I totally disagree with you. I can assure that City is a very goof uni, well organised, with lot of opportunities to distinguish.
I would definitely propose it. The best part is that you can have contact with the professors even after years you finish your LLM and get their opinion and help in subjects you want.
My dear whatelse
You fight against the City University. Well not every one can always be satisfied. I totally disagree with you. I can assure that City is a very goof uni, well organised, with lot of opportunities to distinguish.
I would definitely propose it. The best part is that you can have contact with the professors even after years you finish your LLM and get their opinion and help in subjects you want.
quote
whatelse
Ehheheh, it looks the mask has different faces..

Pls I am in contact with all the students who attended the LLM at City and less than 10% are currently employed in a law firm.. but probably if you got such a good positions you would like to show your CV on Linkdin.. or may be someone from City is wasting our time and space ?
Ehheheh, it looks the mask has different faces..

Pls I am in contact with all the students who attended the LLM at City and less than 10% are currently employed in a law firm.. but probably if you got such a good positions you would like to show your CV on Linkdin.. or may be someone from City is wasting our time and space ?
quote
ltalev
No masks here, What Else... Apart from YOU, that's it... I participate here with my real name - Lyubomir Talev. It is easy to check. Unlike you, I REALLY have been a student in the City Law School for the academic 2008/2009. It is totally NOT TRUE that the lessons or the organization had been poor. The professors are highly motivated, friendly and knowledgeable professionals who I have found most keen to help. As for the classes, there has been just one postponment - when the big snow fell last January and the entire country stopped working for a couple of days.

It is also NOT TRUE that they do not help you with internships - there have been four such internships in big law firms and some of the best students got them (perhaps you have simply not been one of them... if you have been student at all).

As for the jobs after the course, I can name many of my classmates who've such. Myself included - I do have a job where the knowledge gained in the City Law School is appreciated... And no - it is not in the Uni. You could check it by simply googling my name.

P.S. If you really claim that you have been studying in City last year, could you tell the number of the students of the LLM course? Otherwise I stand behibd my words that you are a FRAUD.
No masks here, What Else... Apart from YOU, that's it... I participate here with my real name - Lyubomir Talev. It is easy to check. Unlike you, I REALLY have been a student in the City Law School for the academic 2008/2009. It is totally NOT TRUE that the lessons or the organization had been poor. The professors are highly motivated, friendly and knowledgeable professionals who I have found most keen to help. As for the classes, there has been just one postponment - when the big snow fell last January and the entire country stopped working for a couple of days.

It is also NOT TRUE that they do not help you with internships - there have been four such internships in big law firms and some of the best students got them (perhaps you have simply not been one of them... if you have been student at all).

As for the jobs after the course, I can name many of my classmates who've such. Myself included - I do have a job where the knowledge gained in the City Law School is appreciated... And no - it is not in the Uni. You could check it by simply googling my name.

P.S. If you really claim that you have been studying in City last year, could you tell the number of the students of the LLM course? Otherwise I stand behibd my words that you are a FRAUD.
quote
VE
I would really have to answer as well, as I feel very offended by that kind of behaviour. I was also a LLM student 2008/09 and I enjoyed every moment. I also got an internship and also managed to keep my job. However, this was because of my performance. It is very sad and pathetic that you try to blame others for things you didnt manage to achieve.
Failure and success is part of everyone's life, however the way you choose to deal with them shows the person's quality.
I tried hard to get good marks and to achieve my goals. Your obvious incapability to handle your own choices with dignity is really annoying. I am very sorry.

P.S: and if you really are a student you also cant miss who I am.
I would really have to answer as well, as I feel very offended by that kind of behaviour. I was also a LLM student 2008/09 and I enjoyed every moment. I also got an internship and also managed to keep my job. However, this was because of my performance. It is very sad and pathetic that you try to blame others for things you didnt manage to achieve.
Failure and success is part of everyone's life, however the way you choose to deal with them shows the person's quality.
I tried hard to get good marks and to achieve my goals. Your obvious incapability to handle your own choices with dignity is really annoying. I am very sorry.

P.S: and if you really are a student you also cant miss who I am.
quote
onlyLLM
Dear Dignity,
Referring back to the main question requesting for guidance for LLM w/o LLB:
To add my two cents worth to the advice already offered, be clear in your objectives of why you are considering LLM and be aware of your own learning style. I wanted to do LLM (without LLB) on part-time basis to broaden my skill set and competencies as these complement my full-time work in the Commercial area. After some research similar to yours, I enrolled in the Citys LLM programme because a lot of the faculty are practising lawyers, and the programme is structured to allow study on a part-time basis. I find it is a good balance of class and self-study / research time and the faculty are quite approachable either by e-mail or during the many social events organised by the University. Several students have prior work experience and also contribute to discussions in the class and informal study groups (organised on own initiative). Further, there are several special events organised in the evenings where practising professionals / senior business managers come to speak and are also opportunities to network.

The assumption is that you are there to undertake advanced legal studies and the faculty are there to coach and guide you with this task. It has been a good learning experience so far and I have no serious regrets in enrolling with City. I would emphasise to not underestimate the demands in completing the programme successfully so you get most from it (especially for those without an LLB or equivalent such as the case with me).

Good luck with your search and success in your career.
Dear Dignity,
Referring back to the main question requesting for guidance for LLM w/o LLB:
To add my two cents worth to the advice already offered, be clear in your objectives of why you are considering LLM and be aware of your own learning style. I wanted to do LLM (without LLB) on part-time basis to broaden my skill set and competencies as these complement my full-time work in the Commercial area. After some research similar to yours, I enrolled in the City’s LLM programme because a lot of the faculty are practising lawyers, and the programme is structured to allow study on a part-time basis. I find it is a good balance of class and self-study / research time and the faculty are quite approachable either by e-mail or during the many social events organised by the University. Several students have prior work experience and also contribute to discussions in the class and informal study groups (organised on own initiative). Further, there are several special events organised in the evenings where practising professionals / senior business managers come to speak and are also opportunities to network.

The assumption is that you are there to undertake advanced legal studies and the faculty are there to coach and guide you with this task. It has been a good learning experience so far and I have no serious regrets in enrolling with City. I would emphasise to not underestimate the demands in completing the programme successfully so you get most from it (especially for those without an LLB or equivalent such as the case with me).

Good luck with your search and success in your career.
quote

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