Cambridge LLM 2017 - 2018 Applicants


aiges



We'd just be wasting their time. The decisions will be made eventually. Better to keep our mind off it.


Definitely. It is just that my nerves are shot ;-)

[quote]

We'd just be wasting their time. The decisions will be made eventually. Better to keep our mind off it.[/quote]

Definitely. It is just that my nerves are shot ;-)
quote



We'd just be wasting their time. The decisions will be made eventually. Better to keep our mind off it.


Definitely. It is just that my nerves are shot ;-)


Yeah we should probably just sit tight for another week. Sending loads of positive and happy thoughts to everyone! :)

Just a tiny question: what does it mean if you're being considered by the DC? Does that mean you've met the minimum requirements?

[Edited by entangledmusings on Feb 16, 2017]

[quote][quote]

We'd just be wasting their time. The decisions will be made eventually. Better to keep our mind off it.[/quote]

Definitely. It is just that my nerves are shot ;-)[/quote]

Yeah we should probably just sit tight for another week. Sending loads of positive and happy thoughts to everyone! :)

Just a tiny question: what does it mean if you're being considered by the DC? Does that mean you've met the minimum requirements?
quote
username_i...



We'd just be wasting their time. The decisions will be made eventually. Better to keep our mind off it.


Definitely. It is just that my nerves are shot ;-)


Yeah we should probably just sit tight for another week. Sending loads of positive and happy thoughts to everyone! :)

Just a tiny question: what does it mean if you're being considered by the DC? Does that mean you've met the minimum requirements?


Apparently, it means nothing. It simply means we are considered by the Faculty. You can talk to LegalLife, this is more or less his/her information.

[quote][quote][quote]

We'd just be wasting their time. The decisions will be made eventually. Better to keep our mind off it.[/quote]

Definitely. It is just that my nerves are shot ;-)[/quote]

Yeah we should probably just sit tight for another week. Sending loads of positive and happy thoughts to everyone! :)

Just a tiny question: what does it mean if you're being considered by the DC? Does that mean you've met the minimum requirements? [/quote]

Apparently, it means nothing. It simply means we are considered by the Faculty. You can talk to LegalLife, this is more or less his/her information.
quote
TheDsh

and BOGS!!!

Just kidding. But your heart did jump slightly.

On the bright side we're closer than we were two months ago.

and BOGS!!!

Just kidding. But your heart did jump slightly.

On the bright side we're closer than we were two months ago.
quote
britcanuck

I wonder if they start notifying the people who have been offered admission towards the end of February and wait until they have heard back from them to commence sending out the rejections in March? I'm getting antsy over the wait.

I wonder if they start notifying the people who have been offered admission towards the end of February and wait until they have heard back from them to commence sending out the rejections in March? I'm getting antsy over the wait.
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Vari57

I wonder if they start notifying the people who have been offered admission towards the end of February and wait until they have heard back from them to commence sending out the rejections in March? I'm getting antsy over the wait.


I must admit that I don't know the answer to this but based upon my reading of prior threads, it would seem to be the case that offers have been given out to people as late as mid-March, sometimes even late March.

Whether these individuals were only given an offer after others have declined, I obviously cannot say. It's an interesting theory though.

[Edited by Vari57 on Feb 17, 2017]

[quote]I wonder if they start notifying the people who have been offered admission towards the end of February and wait until they have heard back from them to commence sending out the rejections in March? I'm getting antsy over the wait.[/quote]

I must admit that I don't know the answer to this but based upon my reading of prior threads, it would seem to be the case that offers have been given out to people as late as mid-March, sometimes even late March.

Whether these individuals were only given an offer after others have declined, I obviously cannot say. It's an interesting theory though.
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britcanuck

I just checked previous threads from last year, and, it appears that a few people got BoGS'd that last week of February and people started getting rejected on the morning of March 1st. The people who were still anxiously awaiting a change in their DC status after March 1st got BoGS'd. Sigh...

I just checked previous threads from last year, and, it appears that a few people got BoGS'd that last week of February and people started getting rejected on the morning of March 1st. The people who were still anxiously awaiting a change in their DC status after March 1st got BoGS'd. Sigh...
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wjs2b

any updates???

any updates???
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LegalLife

If you want to know how competitive the LLM is, you just have to look at the Grad Admissions statistics.

In 2015/2016 alone, the LLM/MCL attracted 1,114 applications. 375 offers were made. At the end of it, 176 students confirmed attendance. 155 of those were for the LLM and 21 for the MCL.

[Edited by LegalLife on Feb 20, 2017]

If you want to know how competitive the LLM is, you just have to look at the Grad Admissions statistics.

In 2015/2016 alone, the LLM/MCL attracted 1,114 applications. 375 offers were made. At the end of it, 176 students confirmed attendance. 155 of those were for the LLM and 21 for the MCL.
quote

So it seems that we all have good chances

So it seems that we all have good chances
quote

So it seems that we all have good chances


Do we? (I apologise if I'm being overly pessimistic here!)

[quote]So it seems that we all have good chances[/quote]

Do we? (I apologise if I'm being overly pessimistic here!)
quote
username_i...

So it seems that we all have good chances


Do we? (I apologise if I'm being overly pessimistic here!)


Dunno but 1 in 3 is much better than my LLB was. That was roughly 1 in 6 or 7 (for offers, assuming 2 are made per 1 place).

[quote][quote]So it seems that we all have good chances[/quote]

Do we? (I apologise if I'm being overly pessimistic here!)[/quote]

Dunno but 1 in 3 is much better than my LLB was. That was roughly 1 in 6 or 7 (for offers, assuming 2 are made per 1 place).
quote
Vari57

So it seems that we all have good chances


Do we? (I apologise if I'm being overly pessimistic here!)


Dunno but 1 in 3 is much better than my LLB was. That was roughly 1 in 6 or 7 (for offers, assuming 2 are made per 1 place).


Not to dampen the mood or anything but there are still more people without offers than there are those with offers, however.

735 people didn't receive an offer last year, 375 did.

So the odds might be decent but we still need to keep it in perspective imho.

And since the basic requirement to apply for the course is a first-class undergraduate law or equivalent qualifying degree...well, that narrows the pool of potential applicants from the offing.

[Edited by Vari57 on Feb 20, 2017]

[quote][quote][quote]So it seems that we all have good chances[/quote]

Do we? (I apologise if I'm being overly pessimistic here!)[/quote]

Dunno but 1 in 3 is much better than my LLB was. That was roughly 1 in 6 or 7 (for offers, assuming 2 are made per 1 place). [/quote]

Not to dampen the mood or anything but there are still more people without offers than there are those with offers, however.

735 people didn't receive an offer last year, 375 did.

So the odds might be decent but we still need to keep it in perspective imho.

And since the basic requirement to apply for the course is a first-class undergraduate law or equivalent qualifying degree...well, that narrows the pool of potential applicants from the offing.
quote



Do we? (I apologise if I'm being overly pessimistic here!)


Dunno but 1 in 3 is much better than my LLB was. That was roughly 1 in 6 or 7 (for offers, assuming 2 are made per 1 place).


Not to dampen the mood but there are still more people without offers than there are those with offers, however.

735 people didn't receive an offer last year, 375 did.

So the odds might be decent but we still need to keep it in perspective imho.

And since the basic requirement to apply for the course is a first-class undergraduate degree...well, that narrows the pool of potential applicants from the offing.


Is it daft to hope that at least some of the applicants applied without a 1st class undergraduate degree? Which (hopefully) then makes it slightly less competitive for the rest of us...

[quote][quote][quote][quote]So it seems that we all have good chances[/quote]

Do we? (I apologise if I'm being overly pessimistic here!)[/quote]

Dunno but 1 in 3 is much better than my LLB was. That was roughly 1 in 6 or 7 (for offers, assuming 2 are made per 1 place). [/quote]

Not to dampen the mood but there are still more people without offers than there are those with offers, however.

735 people didn't receive an offer last year, 375 did.

So the odds might be decent but we still need to keep it in perspective imho.

And since the basic requirement to apply for the course is a first-class undergraduate degree...well, that narrows the pool of potential applicants from the offing.[/quote]

Is it daft to hope that at least some of the applicants applied without a 1st class undergraduate degree? Which (hopefully) then makes it slightly less competitive for the rest of us...
quote
username_i...

Vari57: yeah, we need to be realistic. But the chances are relatively good even though I am sure the competition is stiff.

entangled: I don't think it is. I, for example, am applying in my final year (LLB). There are bound to be differences between the relevant grades I have and others in my position have. Some might be further along towads a first than others (UCL, for example, requires us to have 4 firsts in Second and Third Years and an overall average above 67; First Year does not count at all). If you have 1 first and three decent 2.2s you might well apply with a projected first. But you are obviously less likely to get a first than someone who has all 4 firsts and just needs not to screw it all up in Final Year. Plus you have all the people who apply after working for a time who have experience and other things to weigh against a 2.2 degree.

But generally we should not get our hopes up :-). The most important thing will be how high your first is and where you got it.

[Edited by username_is_used on Feb 20, 2017]

Vari57: yeah, we need to be realistic. But the chances are relatively good even though I am sure the competition is stiff.

entangled: I don't think it is. I, for example, am applying in my final year (LLB). There are bound to be differences between the relevant grades I have and others in my position have. Some might be further along towads a first than others (UCL, for example, requires us to have 4 firsts in Second and Third Years and an overall average above 67; First Year does not count at all). If you have 1 first and three decent 2.2s you might well apply with a projected first. But you are obviously less likely to get a first than someone who has all 4 firsts and just needs not to screw it all up in Final Year. Plus you have all the people who apply after working for a time who have experience and other things to weigh against a 2.2 degree.

But generally we should not get our hopes up :-). The most important thing will be how high your first is and where you got it.
quote

Vari57: yeah, we need to be realistic. But the chances are relatively good even though I am sure the competition is stiff.

entangled: I don't think it is. I, for example, am applying in my final year (LLB). There are bound to be differences between the relevant grades I have and others in my position have. Some might be further along towads a first than others (UCL, for example, requires us to have 4 firsts in Second and Third Years and an overall average above 67; First Year does not count at all). If you have 1 first and three decent 2.2s you might well apply with a projected first. But you are obviously less likely to get a first than someone who has all 4 firsts and just needs not to screw it all up in Final Year. Plus you have all the people who apply after working for a time who have experience and other things to weigh against a 2.2 degree.

But generally we should not get our hopes up :-). The most important thing will be how high your first is and where you got it.


Ah thanks! I graduated from the University of Manchester in June last year and doing the Bar now. I did get a first class overall but I'm not sure of my chances at all - I had a couple of firsts in second year (mostly 2:1s) and scored straight (six) firsts in third year. Like UCL, Manchester didn't count first year - which, to be honest, I'm not complaining! Only hope Cambridge doesn't get too hung up on my 1st year grades.

[quote]Vari57: yeah, we need to be realistic. But the chances are relatively good even though I am sure the competition is stiff.

entangled: I don't think it is. I, for example, am applying in my final year (LLB). There are bound to be differences between the relevant grades I have and others in my position have. Some might be further along towads a first than others (UCL, for example, requires us to have 4 firsts in Second and Third Years and an overall average above 67; First Year does not count at all). If you have 1 first and three decent 2.2s you might well apply with a projected first. But you are obviously less likely to get a first than someone who has all 4 firsts and just needs not to screw it all up in Final Year. Plus you have all the people who apply after working for a time who have experience and other things to weigh against a 2.2 degree.

But generally we should not get our hopes up :-). The most important thing will be how high your first is and where you got it. [/quote]

Ah thanks! I graduated from the University of Manchester in June last year and doing the Bar now. I did get a first class overall but I'm not sure of my chances at all - I had a couple of firsts in second year (mostly 2:1s) and scored straight (six) firsts in third year. Like UCL, Manchester didn't count first year - which, to be honest, I'm not complaining! Only hope Cambridge doesn't get too hung up on my 1st year grades.
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LegalLife

By the way, I knew quite a number of LLMs at Cambridge during my year who actually had 2.1 and not 1st and were still admitted, over those with a 1st.

Having a 1st does not guarantee you admission. Your application is assessed as a whole. Some LLMs are definately going to be people with impressive credentials outside academics and no university is going to turn down an impressive CV because you did not get a 1st at undergraduate.

So yes, those with 2.1 applied and yes, some of them will be admitted.

By the way, I knew quite a number of LLMs at Cambridge during my year who actually had 2.1 and not 1st and were still admitted, over those with a 1st.

Having a 1st does not guarantee you admission. Your application is assessed as a whole. Some LLMs are definately going to be people with impressive credentials outside academics and no university is going to turn down an impressive CV because you did not get a 1st at undergraduate.

So yes, those with 2.1 applied and yes, some of them will be admitted.
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napot

Thanks for the info LegalLife, that's reassuring to know that they look at your application as a whole.

In this regard, do you know if it goes the same way with the language score requirement ? I mean can they possibly accept someone who only get a 108 TOEFL score an not the required 110 or do you think that an application which does not meet the language requirement will be automatically rejected ?

Thanks for the info LegalLife, that's reassuring to know that they look at your application as a whole.

In this regard, do you know if it goes the same way with the language score requirement ? I mean can they possibly accept someone who only get a 108 TOEFL score an not the required 110 or do you think that an application which does not meet the language requirement will be automatically rejected ?
quote
abrofeldt

Thanks for the info LegalLife, that's reassuring to know that they look at your application as a whole.

In this regard, do you know if it goes the same way with the language score requirement ? I mean can they possibly accept someone who only get a 108 TOEFL score an not the required 110 or do you think that an application which does not meet the language requirement will be automatically rejected ?


They won't be automatically rejected because of a low TOEFL score. Or at least they didn't last year.

[quote]Thanks for the info LegalLife, that's reassuring to know that they look at your application as a whole.

In this regard, do you know if it goes the same way with the language score requirement ? I mean can they possibly accept someone who only get a 108 TOEFL score an not the required 110 or do you think that an application which does not meet the language requirement will be automatically rejected ?[/quote]

They won't be automatically rejected because of a low TOEFL score. Or at least they didn't last year.
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LegalLife

You are required to pass your English language test, if it is a condition of your admission. This requirement extends all the way to Home Office which requires universities to ensure that their students have sufficient English knowledge.

However, how that requirement is applied and waived is really at the discretion of the university. You may be required to be assessed by the Language Center or attend pre-session classes. The ones who are strict with the English language requirement are the scholarships especially the Trusts. I know someone from my year at Cambridge whose scholarship was withdrawn because he failed his English test (he did not get the required marks that the Trust wanted) so he had to self fund his education.

You are required to pass your English language test, if it is a condition of your admission. This requirement extends all the way to Home Office which requires universities to ensure that their students have sufficient English knowledge.

However, how that requirement is applied and waived is really at the discretion of the university. You may be required to be assessed by the Language Center or attend pre-session classes. The ones who are strict with the English language requirement are the scholarships especially the Trusts. I know someone from my year at Cambridge whose scholarship was withdrawn because he failed his English test (he did not get the required marks that the Trust wanted) so he had to self fund his education.
quote

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