Which LLM in law and technology?


Loïc

I've decided I want to do a LLM centered around technology and the law. After looking through the couple of programs in Europe, two of them have caught my interest for many reasons.
1. Law, technology and business master of law of the Mykolas Romeris university in Vilnius, Lithuania.
They have very interesting courses no other masters have like classes on blockchain and the law, how to start a legaltech, regulation of fintech, practical activities that would actually be useful for future job. It's also affordable and the law department is not that badly ranked. Its around 350 in the world.

2. LLM in innovation,Technology and the Law in the University of Edinburgh
The courses also look interesting even if less practical and probably more centered towards theory than useful skills. Still, it's Edinburgh and a really good university so studying there would probably bring me better opportunities. However, it's a lot more expensive so It would have to be worth it.

I will apply to both, but I have very good grades so I might very well be accepted in both. I just don't know what's best. Which would make finding a job in europe afterwards easier ? Or help me work in tech companies or others in areas surrounding smart contracts, data privacy, cybersecurity, legaltech companies, etc.

I've decided I want to do a LLM centered around technology and the law. After looking through the couple of programs in Europe, two of them have caught my interest for many reasons.
1. Law, technology and business master of law of the Mykolas Romeris university in Vilnius, Lithuania.
They have very interesting courses no other masters have like classes on blockchain and the law, how to start a legaltech, regulation of fintech, practical activities that would actually be useful for future job. It's also affordable and the law department is not that badly ranked. Its around 350 in the world.

2. LLM in innovation,Technology and the Law in the University of Edinburgh
The courses also look interesting even if less practical and probably more centered towards theory than useful skills. Still, it's Edinburgh and a really good university so studying there would probably bring me better opportunities. However, it's a lot more expensive so It would have to be worth it.

I will apply to both, but I have very good grades so I might very well be accepted in both. I just don't know what's best. Which would make finding a job in europe afterwards easier ? Or help me work in tech companies or others in areas surrounding smart contracts, data privacy, cybersecurity, legaltech companies, etc.
quote

I've decided I want to do a LLM centered around technology and the law. After looking through the couple of programs in Europe, two of them have caught my interest for many reasons.
1. Law, technology and business master of law of the Mykolas Romeris university in Vilnius, Lithuania.
They have very interesting courses no other masters have like classes on blockchain and the law, how to start a legaltech, regulation of fintech, practical activities that would actually be useful for future job. It's also affordable and the law department is not that badly ranked. Its around 350 in the world.

2. LLM in innovation,Technology and the Law in the University of Edinburgh
The courses also look interesting even if less practical and probably more centered towards theory than useful skills. Still, it's Edinburgh and a really good university so studying there would probably bring me better opportunities. However, it's a lot more expensive so It would have to be worth it.

I will apply to both, but I have very good grades so I might very well be accepted in both. I just don't know what's best. Which would make finding a job in europe afterwards easier ? Or help me work in tech companies or others in areas surrounding smart contracts, data privacy, cybersecurity, legaltech companies, etc.

I have applied three schools for technology related llm including Edinburgh. Maybe you can also consider KCL, VUB IES where tech law-related opportunities are abundant. Just think about London and Brussels! 





[quote]I've decided I want to do a LLM centered around technology and the law. After looking through the couple of programs in Europe, two of them have caught my interest for many reasons.
1. Law, technology and business master of law of the Mykolas Romeris university in Vilnius, Lithuania.
They have very interesting courses no other masters have like classes on blockchain and the law, how to start a legaltech, regulation of fintech, practical activities that would actually be useful for future job. It's also affordable and the law department is not that badly ranked. Its around 350 in the world.

2. LLM in innovation,Technology and the Law in the University of Edinburgh
The courses also look interesting even if less practical and probably more centered towards theory than useful skills. Still, it's Edinburgh and a really good university so studying there would probably bring me better opportunities. However, it's a lot more expensive so It would have to be worth it.

I will apply to both, but I have very good grades so I might very well be accepted in both. I just don't know what's best. Which would make finding a job in europe afterwards easier ? Or help me work in tech companies or others in areas surrounding smart contracts, data privacy, cybersecurity, legaltech companies, etc. [/quote]<br>I have applied three schools for technology related llm including Edinburgh. Maybe you can also consider KCL, VUB IES where tech law-related opportunities are abundant. Just think about London and Brussels!&nbsp;<br><br><br><br><br><br>
quote
Loïc

I've decided I want to do a LLM centered around technology and the law. After looking through the couple of programs in Europe, two of them have caught my interest for many reasons.
1. Law, technology and business master of law of the Mykolas Romeris university in Vilnius, Lithuania.
They have very interesting courses no other masters have like classes on blockchain and the law, how to start a legaltech, regulation of fintech, practical activities that would actually be useful for future job. It's also affordable and the law department is not that badly ranked. Its around 350 in the world.

2. LLM in innovation,Technology and the Law in the University of Edinburgh
The courses also look interesting even if less practical and probably more centered towards theory than useful skills. Still, it's Edinburgh and a really good university so studying there would probably bring me better opportunities. However, it's a lot more expensive so It would have to be worth it.

I will apply to both, but I have very good grades so I might very well be accepted in both. I just don't know what's best. Which would make finding a job in europe afterwards easier ? Or help me work in tech companies or others in areas surrounding smart contracts, data privacy, cybersecurity, legaltech companies, etc.

I have applied three schools for technology related llm including Edinburgh. Maybe you can also consider KCL, VUB IES where tech law-related opportunities are abundant. Just think about London and Brussels! 







Hey thank you for your answer! Brussels is too focused on IP law for my taste. It's really not what I want to work with even if I know I need to know about it a bit. 
KCl looks pretty great, but as an international student London is a bit out of my budget and the courses don't look very different from Edinburgh. 
I considered Tilburg and Ottawa too since I'm Canadian, but their program don't look as good. Maybe I'm wrong though.

[quote][quote]I've decided I want to do a LLM centered around technology and the law. After looking through the couple of programs in Europe, two of them have caught my interest for many reasons.
1. Law, technology and business master of law of the Mykolas Romeris university in Vilnius, Lithuania.
They have very interesting courses no other masters have like classes on blockchain and the law, how to start a legaltech, regulation of fintech, practical activities that would actually be useful for future job. It's also affordable and the law department is not that badly ranked. Its around 350 in the world.

2. LLM in innovation,Technology and the Law in the University of Edinburgh
The courses also look interesting even if less practical and probably more centered towards theory than useful skills. Still, it's Edinburgh and a really good university so studying there would probably bring me better opportunities. However, it's a lot more expensive so It would have to be worth it.

I will apply to both, but I have very good grades so I might very well be accepted in both. I just don't know what's best. Which would make finding a job in europe afterwards easier ? Or help me work in tech companies or others in areas surrounding smart contracts, data privacy, cybersecurity, legaltech companies, etc. [/quote]<br>I have applied three schools for technology related llm including Edinburgh. Maybe you can also consider KCL, VUB IES where tech law-related opportunities are abundant. Just think about London and Brussels!&nbsp;<br><br><br><br><br><br> [/quote]<br><br>Hey thank you for your answer! Brussels is too focused on IP law for my taste. It's really not what I want to work with even if I know I need to know about it a bit.&nbsp;<br>KCl looks pretty great, but as an international student London is a bit out of my budget and the courses don't look very different from Edinburgh.&nbsp;<br>I considered Tilburg and Ottawa too since I'm Canadian, but their program don't look as good. Maybe I'm wrong though.<br><br>
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