LLM in Taxation


I am thinking to start and LLM in International Taxation. However I am not sure where I can study it. Please help me, I want to know what place is better Leiden or Maastricht. If any of you, know something about the LLM in International Taxation provided by the European Tax Collegue created by Tilburg University and The Catholic University Leuven.

Please help me, I need to decide soon!!!

I am thinking to start and LLM in International Taxation. However I am not sure where I can study it. Please help me, I want to know what place is better Leiden or Maastricht. If any of you, know something about the LLM in International Taxation provided by the European Tax Collegue created by Tilburg University and The Catholic University Leuven.

Please help me, I need to decide soon!!!
quote
koudiarov

Well, I currently stude at Leiden - I find it very good. Van Raads program is one of the best in the world, but not cheap. Check 'core' professors at other schools, but to some extent most of people are the same. Also consider Viena.
Tiburg and Maastricht are relatevly new in this business, but you can try.
Here we have a very intensive study, written case assignments on most days, lot of case discussions and materials to cover. If you have no tax experience it could be tuff and difficult, but you can enjoy it!

Well, I currently stude at Leiden - I find it very good. Van Raads program is one of the best in the world, but not cheap. Check 'core' professors at other schools, but to some extent most of people are the same. Also consider Viena.
Tiburg and Maastricht are relatevly new in this business, but you can try.
Here we have a very intensive study, written case assignments on most days, lot of case discussions and materials to cover. If you have no tax experience it could be tuff and difficult, but you can enjoy it!
quote
Jade_H

I'm currently finishing my Master's degree in International Tax Law at Maastricht (I'm writing my thesis). I really enjoyed this program and that is due to the unique way that class is given. Maastricht has a problem based learning approach (the university stands alone in this approach), which entails that every week, aside from lectures, you have to analyze and tackle a tax issue in a small group of students, under supervision of (usually) a professor or (otherwise) a teacher. Because the groups small you really get a lot of attention and if you are having trouble understanding something, the teachers are open to giving you some extra guidance. The courses are fun and interactive, requiring the students to work in groups on presentations and papers. Aside from purely theoretical courses, there are also a few practical courses, e.g. the International Tax Moot Court (which was so much fun, because you get the opportunity to represent your client in court) and Tax Planning & Transfer Pricing, where during the whole course you are advising your client based on his needs which change weekly. What I was also happy about is that you can start the program at two different stages, in September or in February. Professor Rainer Prokisch also uses his international network to invite guest lecturers from all over the world to speak. I can highly recommend this program, if I were to make the choice again knowing then what I do now, I would still choose Maastricht.

I'm currently finishing my Master's degree in International Tax Law at Maastricht (I'm writing my thesis). I really enjoyed this program and that is due to the unique way that class is given. Maastricht has a problem based learning approach (the university stands alone in this approach), which entails that every week, aside from lectures, you have to analyze and tackle a tax issue in a small group of students, under supervision of (usually) a professor or (otherwise) a teacher. Because the groups small you really get a lot of attention and if you are having trouble understanding something, the teachers are open to giving you some extra guidance. The courses are fun and interactive, requiring the students to work in groups on presentations and papers. Aside from purely theoretical courses, there are also a few practical courses, e.g. the International Tax Moot Court (which was so much fun, because you get the opportunity to represent your client in court) and Tax Planning & Transfer Pricing, where during the whole course you are advising your client based on his needs which change weekly. What I was also happy about is that you can start the program at two different stages, in September or in February. Professor Rainer Prokisch also uses his international network to invite guest lecturers from all over the world to speak. I can highly recommend this program, if I were to make the choice again knowing then what I do now, I would still choose Maastricht.
quote
Jesse C.

In September 2007 I started the LL.M. degree in 'International and European Tax Law' at Maastricht University.

Considering the fact that I am Dutch, I would like to mention that what I especially enjoy about the degree in Maastricht is meeting the students from different countries. It truly is an 'international' degree. In my year there are students from Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Indonesia and Portugal. Last February we were joined by students from the new EU Member States.
Meeting these people obviously means you are also confronted with foreign tax systems and that is what the degree is all about. This cultural mix in the tutorial groups finds great expression in the course 'Corporate taxation' (one of the first courses in the academic year) for example: how do other jurisdictions perceive thin capitalisation rules? Moreover, having a German in your tutorial group certainly makes discussing the Lankhorst-Hohorst case (even) more exciting.

Furthermore, I have to say that the faculty staff are most approachable. I have heard stories about the relationship between the professor and the student in other countries. Apparently it is not uncommon to have an environment in which the professor is considered to be 'god' and the student the ordinary mortal.
This is certainly not the case in Maastricht. Lively discussions during the tutorials and lectures are really encouraged. If you dissent from prof. Prokisch regarding the question whether there is a permanent establishment or not, you are invited to share your legal reasoning.
The staff are not only interested in hearing from the students during lessons; there is always room for a personal talk. There are still 5 months left in the academic year and as far as I know we have already been invited twice for a drink in the local pub by different professors. Last November a professor and a university teacher took us out for lunch.

Lastly, I would like to stress that the staff really go to great lenghts to provide the best eductional experience. It has happened that extra tutorials were put in without the tutors receiving the corresponding remuneration. Additional lectures are offered for those students starting the degree in February who have obviously missed the introductory courses and who might not be that familiar with certain aspects of (European) tax law. These examples clearly show that the staff are passionate about the field they are in.

I hope I have given an insight into the LL.M. degree in Maastricht. If there are any questions do not hesitate to answer this message as I will automatically receive a notification via e-mail.

P.S. I have not mentioned the beauty of the city of Maastricht, but you will see for yourself when you get there!

In September 2007 I started the LL.M. degree in 'International and European Tax Law' at Maastricht University.

Considering the fact that I am Dutch, I would like to mention that what I especially enjoy about the degree in Maastricht is meeting the students from different countries. It truly is an 'international' degree. In my year there are students from Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Indonesia and Portugal. Last February we were joined by students from the new EU Member States.
Meeting these people obviously means you are also confronted with foreign tax systems and that is what the degree is all about. This cultural mix in the tutorial groups finds great expression in the course 'Corporate taxation' (one of the first courses in the academic year) for example: how do other jurisdictions perceive thin capitalisation rules? Moreover, having a German in your tutorial group certainly makes discussing the Lankhorst-Hohorst case (even) more exciting.

Furthermore, I have to say that the faculty staff are most approachable. I have heard stories about the relationship between the professor and the student in other countries. Apparently it is not uncommon to have an environment in which the professor is considered to be 'god' and the student the ordinary mortal.
This is certainly not the case in Maastricht. Lively discussions during the tutorials and lectures are really encouraged. If you dissent from prof. Prokisch regarding the question whether there is a permanent establishment or not, you are invited to share your legal reasoning.
The staff are not only interested in hearing from the students during lessons; there is always room for a personal talk. There are still 5 months left in the academic year and as far as I know we have already been invited twice for a drink in the local pub by different professors. Last November a professor and a university teacher took us out for lunch.

Lastly, I would like to stress that the staff really go to great lenghts to provide the best eductional experience. It has happened that extra tutorials were put in without the tutors receiving the corresponding remuneration. Additional lectures are offered for those students starting the degree in February who have obviously missed the introductory courses and who might not be that familiar with certain aspects of (European) tax law. These examples clearly show that the staff are passionate about the field they are in.

I hope I have given an insight into the LL.M. degree in Maastricht. If there are any questions do not hesitate to answer this message as I will automatically receive a notification via e-mail.

P.S. I have not mentioned the beauty of the city of Maastricht, but you will see for yourself when you get there!
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

Leiden, Netherlands 559 Followers 481 Discussions
Full Profile
Maastricht, Netherlands 242 Followers 202 Discussions
Tilburg, Netherlands 9 Followers 15 Discussions
Tilburg, Netherlands 225 Followers 173 Discussions
Leuven, Belgium 72 Followers 68 Discussions

Other Related Content

LL.M. Application Deadlines for Fall 2020: Law Schools in Europe

News Oct 29, 2019