Career Prospects


Hey guys, anyone knows about the career prospects of studying in Amsterdam, especially economic fields of law?

Hey guys, anyone knows about the career prospects of studying in Amsterdam, especially economic fields of law?
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LuLu100

Hey - what do you mean by economic fields of law? There’s good demand in the Dutch market for corporate lawyers, but from what I know it’s mainly people who are already qualified in another jurisdiction (part. U.K.) - not sure that helps

Hey - what do you mean by economic fields of law? There’s good demand in the Dutch market for corporate lawyers, but from what I know it’s mainly people who are already qualified in another jurisdiction (part. U.K.) - not sure that helps
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Hey - what do you mean by economic fields of law? There’s good demand in the Dutch market for corporate lawyers, but from what I know it’s mainly people who are already qualified in another jurisdiction (part. U.K.) - not sure that helps


Hello! I want to study the competition and regulation track. And I already hava been admitted to the bar in my country (from south America), I have some experience as wellI'm planning to stay a few years at least

[quote]Hey - what do you mean by economic fields of law? There’s good demand in the Dutch market for corporate lawyers, but from what I know it’s mainly people who are already qualified in another jurisdiction (part. U.K.) - not sure that helps [/quote]<br><br>Hello! I want to study the competition and regulation track. And I already hava been admitted to the bar in my country (from south America), I have some experience as well<div>I'm planning to stay a few years at least</div>
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LuLu100

Sorry I meant what type of lawyer do you want to be.... there are no many SA finance lawyers in London, if you fancy the move - no need for LLM just a straight transition into Biglaw, you just need to speak to a recruiter and have a recognisable firm name on your CV.
In terms for competition law, Brussels is where it’s at but from my experience they hire mainly French-speaking lawyers or those associates moving from London due to Brexit (and who don’t want to be in Dublin)
Not sure if that helps!

Sorry I meant what type of lawyer do you want to be.... there are no many SA finance lawyers in London, if you fancy the move - no need for LLM just a straight transition into Biglaw, you just need to speak to a recruiter and have a recognisable firm name on your CV.<br>In terms for competition law, Brussels is where it’s at but from my experience they hire mainly French-speaking lawyers or those associates moving from London due to Brexit (and who don’t want to be in Dublin)<br>Not sure if that helps!
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Your insight is very helpful! Some clarifications:
-I don't care what kind of lawyer, as I can work in my field
-If I have to work in another country from Europe, so be it 
Said that, does an LLM from Amsterdam will open the gates for this? Maybe should I pursue a more general program (such as business law)?
-Also, do you know by any chance about the LLM in Law & Economics from Utrecht, which is oriented towards competition and regulation?(if so, would you recommend?)

Your insight is very helpful! Some clarifications:<br>-I don't care what kind of lawyer, as I can work in my field<br>-If I have to work in another country from Europe, so be it&nbsp;<br>Said that, does an LLM from Amsterdam will open the gates for this? Maybe should I pursue a more general program (such as business law)?<br>-Also, do you know by any chance about the LLM in Law &amp; Economics from Utrecht, which is oriented towards competition and regulation?(if so, would you recommend?)
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A3456

No LLM will be a golden ticket, it all depends on how you market yourself, and your prior experience. If you already practiced then your connections in your home country could be a great advantage when applying in Europe. If you intend to study and practice competition law, Brussels is the place to be, but it’s a tough market to break into. You should be aware many international applicants (with good credentials) end up working as “Trainee” or “Legal Consultant” for years at big law firms, since entry-level Associate jobs are scarce and very competitive.

[Edited by A3456 on Feb 26, 2021]

No LLM will be a golden ticket, it all depends on how you market yourself, and your prior experience. If you already practiced then your connections in your home country could be a great advantage when applying in Europe. If you intend to study and practice competition law, Brussels is the place to be, but it’s a tough market to break into. You should be aware many international applicants (with good credentials) end up working as “Trainee” or “Legal Consultant” for years at big law firms, since entry-level Associate jobs are scarce and very competitive.<br>
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No LLM will be a golden ticket, it all depends on how you market yourself, and your prior experience. If you already practiced then your connections in your home country could be a great advantage when applying in Europe. If you intend to study and practice competition law, Brussels is the place to be, but it’s a tough market to break into. You should be aware many international applicants (with good credentials) end up working as “Trainee” or “Legal Consultant” for years at big law firms, since entry-level Associate jobs are scarce and very competitive.


Thanks for your insight. Honestly I'd just like to end up in an international hub of law, maybe London, Paris, New York, Toronto and so. To me sounds promising working even as a trainee or legal consultant, once there you probably can scale up with the time.

Despite self improvement and networking, do you consider Amsterdam to have good credentials for the field in those law hubs?

[quote]No LLM will be a golden ticket, it all depends on how you market yourself, and your prior experience. If you already practiced then your connections in your home country could be a great advantage when applying in Europe. If you intend to study and practice competition law, Brussels is the place to be, but it’s a tough market to break into. You should be aware many international applicants (with good credentials) end up working as “Trainee” or “Legal Consultant” for years at big law firms, since entry-level Associate jobs are scarce and very competitive.<br> [/quote]<br><br>Thanks for your insight. Honestly I'd just like to end up in an international hub of law, maybe London, Paris, New York, Toronto and so. To me sounds promising working even as a trainee or legal consultant, once there you probably can scale up with the time.<br><br>Despite self improvement and networking, do you consider Amsterdam to have good credentials for the field in those law hubs?
quote
A3456

No LLM will be a golden ticket, it all depends on how you market yourself, and your prior experience. If you already practiced then your connections in your home country could be a great advantage when applying in Europe. If you intend to study and practice competition law, Brussels is the place to be, but it’s a tough market to break into. You should be aware many international applicants (with good credentials) end up working as “Trainee” or “Legal Consultant” for years at big law firms, since entry-level Associate jobs are scarce and very competitive.


Thanks for your insight. Honestly I'd just like to end up in an international hub of law, maybe London, Paris, New York, Toronto and so. To me sounds promising working even as a trainee or legal consultant, once there you probably can scale up with the time.

Despite self improvement and networking, do you consider Amsterdam to have good credentials for the field in those law hubs?


With an LLM from Amsterdam it will be very difficult if not impossible to land a job in London or New York, since it’s already very difficult to get such a job with an LLM from a top US school. The New York market is saturated with JDs so every year there may be a handful LLMs from let’s say Harvard or NYU who get a job there and those positions go to people from interesting markets client wise (South America/ India). Those people also have many years of practice experience in their home countries, and even then given the very low number it’s not even a guarantee. I have seen people with US LLMs taking the new york bar and getting a job in London, but that would still be pretty rare. 

I don’t have much insight in the Paris and Toronto markets.. But I’d say the Paris market is kind of odd in the sense that it’s already quite a feat for French nationals to get an Associate job at a top firm. Most go from internship to internship while trying the “concours” for the bar.. Gives the impression it could be very tough for international candidates with no seeming educational or professional background in the French system. I know that French firms loooooove the College of Europe though, but could not imagine someone with a non-French degree but and LLM from the College of Europe getting a job in Paris.

So if you would like to work in a hub you’re better off gunning for a recognizable US or UK degree, but even then I’d say it’s not a guarantee. Given the expense and risk you could very well go for an LLM in Amsterdam, hope to get a job there or in Brussels (still competitive fields and especially in Brussels they like degrees from the UK or US) and work your way up and volunteer for secondments in cities like Paris, NY or London..

[Edited by A3456 on Mar 04, 2021]

[quote][quote]No LLM will be a golden ticket, it all depends on how you market yourself, and your prior experience. If you already practiced then your connections in your home country could be a great advantage when applying in Europe. If you intend to study and practice competition law, Brussels is the place to be, but it’s a tough market to break into. You should be aware many international applicants (with good credentials) end up working as “Trainee” or “Legal Consultant” for years at big law firms, since entry-level Associate jobs are scarce and very competitive.<br> [/quote]<br><br>Thanks for your insight. Honestly I'd just like to end up in an international hub of law, maybe London, Paris, New York, Toronto and so. To me sounds promising working even as a trainee or legal consultant, once there you probably can scale up with the time.<br><br>Despite self improvement and networking, do you consider Amsterdam to have good credentials for the field in those law hubs? [/quote]<br><br>With an LLM from Amsterdam it will be very difficult if not impossible to land a job in London or New York, since it’s already very difficult to get such a job with an LLM from a top US school. The New York market is saturated with JDs so every year there may be a handful LLMs from let’s say Harvard or NYU who get a job there and those positions go to people from interesting markets client wise (South America/ India). Those people also have many years of practice experience in their home countries, and even then given the very low number it’s not even a guarantee. I have seen people with US LLMs taking the new york bar and getting a job in London, but that would still be pretty rare.&nbsp;<br><br>I don’t have much insight in the Paris and Toronto markets.. But I’d say the Paris market is kind of odd in the sense that it’s already quite a feat for French nationals to get an Associate job at a top firm. Most go from internship to internship while trying the “concours” for the bar.. Gives the impression it could be very tough for international candidates with no seeming educational or professional background in the French system. I know that French firms loooooove the College of Europe though, but could not imagine someone with a non-French degree but and LLM from the College of Europe getting a job in Paris.<br><br>So if you would like to work in a hub you’re better off gunning for a recognizable US or UK degree, but even then I’d say it’s not a guarantee. Given the expense and risk you could very well go for an LLM in Amsterdam, hope to get a job there or in Brussels (still competitive fields and especially in Brussels they like degrees from the UK or US) and work your way up and volunteer for secondments in cities like Paris, NY or London..<br>
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Extremely helpful!!! Really. Under my current circumstances the best shot for me is definitely Amsterdam, so maybe I'll just aim for another market less competitive. Thanks!

Extremely helpful!!! Really. Under my current circumstances the best shot for me is definitely Amsterdam, so maybe I'll just aim for another market less competitive. Thanks!
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