Can I be a Lawyer in Germany?


Dear friends.

I hope you all are doing well. I need your guidance. I have completed LLB in 2012 from Pakistan then I have completed M.A (Masters) in International Relations. I am practicing Advocate since 2012 in Pakistan. I want to know that how can I be a Lawyer in Germany because I am non EU Lawyer. However I have experience of 8 years with tremendous success and achievements. Is there any way to become lawyer in Deutschland on same qualification and experience? I would appreciate your kind information, If you could guide me. Your kind cooperation is highly appreciated.

Regards

Dear friends.

I hope you all are doing well. I need your guidance. I have completed LLB in 2012 from Pakistan then I have completed M.A (Masters) in International Relations. I am practicing Advocate since 2012 in Pakistan. I want to know that how can I be a Lawyer in Germany because I am non EU Lawyer. However I have experience of 8 years with tremendous success and achievements. Is there any way to become lawyer in Deutschland on same qualification and experience? I would appreciate your kind information, If you could guide me. Your kind cooperation is highly appreciated.

Regards
quote
rosyth

Hi,
the German admission system is very strict and it applies to every lawyer, regardless of the nationality, including European citizens. In order to be able to practice as a lawyer/barrister you will have to pass both bachelor and master exams at a German university (bachelor) and with one of the German provinces, that are responsible for the master training. 6.5 years absolute minimum. Strong proficiency in German mandatory as all exams will be in German.
Only then will you be eligible for registration as a lawyer with one of the German bar associations. Once you are registered liabilty insurance is compulsory and you have increased legal obligations.

Another possibility would be to work as a legal expert for a company or a German law firm, meaning you are not entitled to present a case in court nor officially carry out any legal acts that by law require the author to a be full-fledged German lawyer.

Sorry for the disappointing news. Maybe, you want to pick another country, where things are easier.

Best

Hi, <br>the German admission system is very strict and it applies to every lawyer, regardless of the nationality, including European citizens. In order to be able to practice as a lawyer/barrister you will have to pass both bachelor and master exams at a German university (bachelor) and with one of the German provinces, that are responsible for the master training. 6.5 years absolute minimum. Strong proficiency in German mandatory as all exams will be in German.<br>Only then will you be eligible for registration as a lawyer with one of the German bar associations. Once you are registered liabilty insurance is compulsory and you have increased legal obligations.<br><br>Another possibility would be to work as a legal expert for a company or a German law firm, meaning you are not entitled to present a case in court nor officially carry out any legal acts that by law require the author to a be full-fledged German lawyer.<br><br>Sorry for the disappointing news. Maybe, you want to pick another country, where things are easier.<br><br>Best<br><br>
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chicken so...

Yeah, your experience outside the country is mostly meaningless if you are angling to practice in-country, and this is mostly true even if you have already practiced in another country in the EU. You'll have to go through the process like everybody else.

In general this is true for most countries, it's a real uphill battle to practice in-country unless you've gone through a certain series of requirements, like completing a first law degree, an apprenticeship, and / or passing a bar exam.

As rosyth notes above, doing legal consulting work for a firm is a possibility, but you'd need to find one that is in need of your particular expertise. Maybe for example a German company that's doing a lot of business in Pakistan needs somebody with certain legal knowledge about the country. This kind of work may be rare, though, and you'd still most certainly need a perfect command of the German language to engage at all with a German law firm. 

Yeah, your experience outside the country is mostly meaningless if you are angling to practice in-country, and this is mostly true even if you have already practiced in another country in the EU. You'll have to go through the process like everybody else.<br><br>In general this is true for most countries, it's a real uphill battle to practice in-country unless you've gone through a certain series of requirements, like completing a first law degree, an apprenticeship, and / or passing a bar exam.<br><br>As rosyth notes above, doing legal consulting work for a firm is a possibility, but you'd need to find one that is in need of your particular expertise. Maybe for example a German company that's doing a lot of business in Pakistan needs somebody with certain legal knowledge about the country. This kind of work may be rare, though, and you'd still most certainly need a perfect command of the German language to engage at all with a German law firm.&nbsp;
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