Best Law Schools in Continental Europe?


Joh
@ Mr Hoffmann

And that is based on...?
@ Mr Hoffmann

And that is based on...?
quote
Erkan
What's Liège doing in this "ranking"?
What's Liège doing in this "ranking"?
quote
The relation between the value of a product, its real price, its branding effect is more than complex and subjective...
The relation between the value of a product, its real price, its branding effect is more than complex and subjective...
quote
Without a doubt :

http://www.llm-guide.com/university/533/university-of-liege-institute-for-european-legal-studies
Without a doubt :

http://www.llm-guide.com/university/533/university-of-liege-institute-for-european-legal-studies
quote
University of Geneva and Bucerius Law School are the best
University of Geneva and Bucerius Law School are the best
quote
spongebob
In my opinion, there are some big names which most European lawyers and academics will highly respect:
Oxbridge
UCL
Edinburgh
Leiden
Heidelberg
Bologna
Panthéon-Sorbonne

I would also say that, in continental Europe, there is a strong shift in academic weight towards the more dynamic, internationally-oriented, and often younger faculties:

The Netherlands:
Maastricht University
Tilburg University

Belgium:
College of Europe

Spain:
ESADE
IESE

Germany:
Bucerius Law School
Europa-Institut Saarland

Italy:
European University Institute Florence

Portugal:
Universidade Católica, Lisbon

Czech Republic:
Charles University, Prague
In my opinion, there are some big names which most European lawyers and academics will highly respect:
Oxbridge
UCL
Edinburgh
Leiden
Heidelberg
Bologna
Panthéon-Sorbonne

I would also say that, in continental Europe, there is a strong shift in academic weight towards the more dynamic, internationally-oriented, and often younger faculties:

The Netherlands:
Maastricht University
Tilburg University

Belgium:
College of Europe

Spain:
ESADE
IESE

Germany:
Bucerius Law School
Europa-Institut Saarland

Italy:
European University Institute Florence

Portugal:
Universidade Católica, Lisbon

Czech Republic:
Charles University, Prague
quote
mikado
I also recommend Sciences Po Paris (Institut d'Etudes de Paris) which is a very highly regarded university in Paris. They have programs in law and have connections with prestigious universities such as the LSE (London) and Columbia (NY) among others.


I wouldn't recommend Sciences Po for law. Their law program is "young" and international visibility is inexistant (kind of in between a University and a "grande école"). In France, there are 2 Universities worth studying law at for foreigners which are Paris II Assas and Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne.
<blockquote>I also recommend Sciences Po Paris (Institut d'Etudes de Paris) which is a very highly regarded university in Paris. They have programs in law and have connections with prestigious universities such as the LSE (London) and Columbia (NY) among others.</blockquote>

I wouldn't recommend Sciences Po for law. Their law program is "young" and international visibility is inexistant (kind of in between a University and a "grande école"). In France, there are 2 Universities worth studying law at for foreigners which are Paris II Assas and Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne.
quote
Aparnalaw
Hi,
I am an Indian law student (Currently doing my LLB from the university of Delhi) . Before this I have also done an MBA from a prestigious institute in India.

I have obtained the DALF C2 , and I am fluent in french.
I am interested in doing an LLM from Paris I or II, and practising as a lawyer there. However i don't have much idea about the fields of practice there. Is it better to do an LLM in european law or in a specific field of french law ?

Can you give any info or any useful links in this regard ?
Hi,
I am an Indian law student (Currently doing my LLB from the university of Delhi) . Before this I have also done an MBA from a prestigious institute in India.

I have obtained the DALF C2 , and I am fluent in french.
I am interested in doing an LLM from Paris I or II, and practising as a lawyer there. However i don't have much idea about the fields of practice there. Is it better to do an LLM in european law or in a specific field of french law ?

Can you give any info or any useful links in this regard ?
quote
University of Geneva and Bucerius Law School are the best


The Graduate Institute in Geneva (IHEID) - International law Programme

London School of Economics

Pantheon IV Paris Law Programme
<blockquote>University of Geneva and Bucerius Law School are the best </blockquote>

The Graduate Institute in Geneva (IHEID) - International law Programme

London School of Economics

Pantheon IV Paris Law Programme



quote
In my opinion:

Continental Europe

1. Sorbonne
2.Heidelberg
3.Leiden
4. Geneva
5. Berlin
6. Bologna
5. Bruxelles
In my opinion:

Continental Europe

1. Sorbonne
2.Heidelberg
3.Leiden
4. Geneva
5. Berlin
6. Bologna
5. Bruxelles
quote
winseit
Hi! I am also doing an LLM in the Netherlands and I have to agree with Joanna. Tilburg is simply the best option for both Business Law and Public Law. In fact, the University's Law School is currently ranked as the No. 1 International Law School by the Social Science Research Network (just visit the rankings section of www.ssrn.com).

They are also introducing significant changes to their main programmes which will allow them to keep their position as a top European law school. In brief, I believe that Tilburg is the best option for those of you out there considering an LLM.


Hello,

I would not recommend Spain. The level of teaching is not very high. UK is a good option if you have scholarship. Currently, i'm doing my LLM in Netherlands in Tilburg and believe me, i couldn't find better.
Utrecht and Leiden are not so good anymore. The problem is that they're well known for the history and tradition, but they do not offer the up to date programmes, what in my opinion is crucial if you wanna be a state-of-the-art lawyer.


I do not agree with the last comment. Spain, France or Portugal have harder law schools than most in Northern Europe, and the amount of knowledge is higher, but of course you must speak the language of the country.
The English Universities are usually very bad, very poor quality (with the exception of Oxford, Cambridge...) but they sell themselves very well in the "university market", but thats all, marketing, no substance.
Scandinavian universities and Dutch ones are indeed better. Also German, but you have the same "problem" as in France, Spain and Portugal, you need to speak the language.
<blockquote>Hi! I am also doing an LLM in the Netherlands and I have to agree with Joanna. Tilburg is simply the best option for both Business Law and Public Law. In fact, the University's Law School is currently ranked as the No. 1 International Law School by the Social Science Research Network (just visit the rankings section of www.ssrn.com).

They are also introducing significant changes to their main programmes which will allow them to keep their position as a top European law school. In brief, I believe that Tilburg is the best option for those of you out there considering an LLM.



<blockquote>Hello,

I would not recommend Spain. The level of teaching is not very high. UK is a good option if you have scholarship. Currently, i'm doing my LLM in Netherlands in Tilburg and believe me, i couldn't find better.
Utrecht and Leiden are not so good anymore. The problem is that they're well known for the history and tradition, but they do not offer the up to date programmes, what in my opinion is crucial if you wanna be a state-of-the-art lawyer.</blockquote></blockquote>

I do not agree with the last comment. Spain, France or Portugal have harder law schools than most in Northern Europe, and the amount of knowledge is higher, but of course you must speak the language of the country.
The English Universities are usually very bad, very poor quality (with the exception of Oxford, Cambridge...) but they sell themselves very well in the "university market", but thats all, marketing, no substance.
Scandinavian universities and Dutch ones are indeed better. Also German, but you have the same "problem" as in France, Spain and Portugal, you need to speak the language.
quote
louison
In my opinion:
If you want to practice in France the ranking is :

1 - ASSAS (far far far away)

2 - Sorbonne

3 - The rest
Continental Europe

1. Sorbonne
2.Heidelberg
3.Leiden
4. Geneva
5. Berlin
6. Bologna
5. Bruxelles
In my opinion:
If you want to practice in France the ranking is :

1 - ASSAS (far far far away)

2 - Sorbonne

3 - The rest
Continental Europe

1. Sorbonne
2.Heidelberg
3.Leiden
4. Geneva
5. Berlin
6. Bologna
5. Bruxelles
quote
jacob 272
To be honest: The best Law School in Germany is Bucerius Law School in Hamburg. Nearly every ranking will tell you this. They have partner universities such as NUS, NYU, Chicago, Stanford...The students get the best exams from whole Germany and if you ask the big law firms they will tell you the same!
To be honest: The best Law School in Germany is Bucerius Law School in Hamburg. Nearly every ranking will tell you this. They have partner universities such as NUS, NYU, Chicago, Stanford...The students get the best exams from whole Germany and if you ask the big law firms they will tell you the same!
quote
mikado
Wow this thread is total BS.

At least for France and for Business and Banking law, you should know this :
ASSAS / SORBONNE (Master 2 + Magistère if possible)
DJCE from all Unis with ASSAS having the most prestigious one

With these degrees you can get in most international law firms in Paris, depending on your personal profile (languages etc).

Usually, the best "prospects" complete their education with a top LLM from the US or UK and / or a top business school (HEC / ESSEC / ESCP / EM LYON).
Wow this thread is total BS.

At least for France and for Business and Banking law, you should know this :
ASSAS / SORBONNE (Master 2 + Magistère if possible)
DJCE from all Unis with ASSAS having the most prestigious one

With these degrees you can get in most international law firms in Paris, depending on your personal profile (languages etc).

Usually, the best "prospects" complete their education with a top LLM from the US or UK and / or a top business school (HEC / ESSEC / ESCP / EM LYON).
quote
Manuel
hello:
i was wondering if there's any way to get a list of all masters in arbitration available in continental Europe not only the most valuable, like the one in University of London.
i'll apreciate alot your help
hello:
i was wondering if there's any way to get a list of all masters in arbitration available in continental Europe not only the most valuable, like the one in University of London.
i'll apreciate alot your help
quote
rollingr
First of all it is to mention that in Europe exist two different law systems: the Anglo-American (common) law system, that became popular because of GBs' many former colonies (e.g. USA, Australia, Canada, Southafrica) and the continental European Civil Law that is mainly based on codified law. So it is easier and more effective to study in Great Britain for English speaking students.

The Germans (I am a German) and many other contries, except France and Italy speak (unterstand) quite good English. To say it friendly: The French prefer French and the Italiens prefer Italien.

In Germany there are no elite universities (okay since a week or so we have three, but in fact only in natural siences). But there are some with very good repute.
Of course the Bavarian Law Faculties of Munich and Heidelberg are the best in Germany.
The LL.M programs are not so popular in Germany and I think nearly all lectures are in German. There must be a relative new and good private law school in Hamburg, the Bucerius Law School.

I cant tell you something about the rest of the (Continental = Old ;-)) Europian law schools.
The Sorbonne in Paris is one of the most famous universities at all.
Bologna (Italy) is very old and has a very long tradition in teaching law.
Especially Brussels (mainseat of European Parliament) and also Brugge are important for studies in European law.

On the continet everyone knows the very famous and traditionl good universities of England: Oxford and Cambridge.

So, if you do not want to study especially European Law or one of the national European laws or speak any European language fluent, study in England! ;-)

My law school is at Augsburg. This is a little city in Bavaria near to Munich and has now also an own LL.M program, but I would not recommend it.



I don't think there is a university in Brugge at all.correct me if I 'm wrong
<blockquote>First of all it is to mention that in Europe exist two different law systems: the Anglo-American (common) law system, that became popular because of GBs' many former colonies (e.g. USA, Australia, Canada, Southafrica) and the continental European Civil Law that is mainly based on codified law. So it is easier and more effective to study in Great Britain for English speaking students.

The Germans (I am a German) and many other contries, except France and Italy speak (unterstand) quite good English. To say it friendly: The French prefer French and the Italiens prefer Italien.

In Germany there are no elite universities (okay since a week or so we have three, but in fact only in natural siences). But there are some with very good repute.
Of course the Bavarian Law Faculties of Munich and Heidelberg are the best in Germany.
The LL.M programs are not so popular in Germany and I think nearly all lectures are in German. There must be a relative new and good private law school in Hamburg, the Bucerius Law School.

I cant tell you something about the rest of the (Continental = Old ;-)) Europian law schools.
The Sorbonne in Paris is one of the most famous universities at all.
Bologna (Italy) is very old and has a very long tradition in teaching law.
Especially Brussels (mainseat of European Parliament) and also Brugge are important for studies in European law.

On the continet everyone knows the very famous and traditionl good universities of England: Oxford and Cambridge.

So, if you do not want to study especially European Law or one of the national European laws or speak any European language fluent, study in England! ;-)

My law school is at Augsburg. This is a little city in Bavaria near to Munich and has now also an own LL.M program, but I would not recommend it.</blockquote>



I don't think there is a university in Brugge at all.correct me if I 'm wrong
quote
lalla
This a very amusing thread, indeed.

In Bruges there is the College of Europe. It's a university institute of postgraduate studies and training in European affairs. The above doesn't say anything about there being a university in Bruges. It's actually correct in stating it being important regarding studies and training in European affairs. The College now operates as one College - two campuses and what was once referred to as the esprit de Bruges, is now known as the esprit du Collège, because of the College of Europe campus at Natolin (Warsaw, Poland), which was founded in 1993. Its well known all over Europe and was mentioned at the beginning of the thread as well.

I don't about rankings, especially regarding German Law Schools.

To add to your history of universities discussion, you should not forget to mention the Charles University (Prague) which was founded in 1348 as a first university to the north of the Alps (Bologna) and to the east of Paris. It followed the example of the Bolognese and the Parisian universities and consists of four faculties: faculty of theology, of arts, of law, and of medicine. It was the first university thought in German.

Heidelberg is not a Bavarian university; its a university in Baden-Württemberg.
This a very amusing thread, indeed.

In Bruges there is the College of Europe. It's a university institute of postgraduate studies and training in European affairs. The above doesn't say anything about there being a university in Bruges. It's actually correct in stating it being important regarding studies and training in European affairs. The College now operates as ‘one College - two campuses’ and what was once referred to as the ‘esprit de Bruges’, is now known as the ‘esprit du Collège’, because of the College of Europe campus at Natolin (Warsaw, Poland), which was founded in 1993. It’s well known all over Europe and was mentioned at the beginning of the thread as well.

I don't about rankings, especially regarding German Law Schools.

To add to your history of universities discussion, you should not forget to mention the Charles University (Prague) which was founded in 1348 as a first university to the north of the Alps (Bologna) and to the east of Paris. It followed the example of the Bolognese and the Parisian universities and consists of four faculties: faculty of theology, of arts, of law, and of medicine. It was the first university thought in German.

Heidelberg is not a Bavarian university; it’s a university in Baden-Württemberg.
quote
louison
Hi all,

Just to inform you of a new international ranking of degrees in law & taxation.

For Europe, I'm quite proud of my university, Assas. ^_^
http://www.best-masters.com/ranking-master-business-and-commercial-law-in-western-europe.html
Hi all,

Just to inform you of a new international ranking of degrees in law & taxation.

For Europe, I'm quite proud of my university, Assas. ^_^
http://www.best-masters.com/ranking-master-business-and-commercial-law-in-western-europe.html
quote
At a graduate level, for Master degrees I would say that Católica Global School of Law (Universidade Católica) is one of the best.

http://www.fd.lisboa.ucp.pt/site/custom/template/ucptplfac.asp?sspageID=3293&lang=2

The LL.M.'s programme have been recognized for two years in a row in the FT rankings, but more than that, it has perhaps the most amazing faculty - that any LL.M. offers., and the professors themselves recognize this. Professor Weiler, Poiaires Maduro, Armin von Bogdandy, Damian Chalmers, James Boyle, Daniel Halberstam, David Gerber, Eric A. Posner, Mattias Kumm, Neil Walker, Piet Eeckhout, Petros Mavroidis, Stephen Weatherill .... and the list goes on.

check out the programme:
http://www.fd.lisboa.ucp.pt/resources/documents/LL.M/LLM%20Law%20in%20a%20European%20and%20Global%20Context/2012-2013/LLM_LawEuropeanGlobalContext_LisbonCatolica.pdf

I finished this LL.M. last year and it was a great experience. I would be happy to give you my feedback and share my experiences there.
At a graduate level, for Master degrees I would say that Católica Global School of Law (Universidade Católica) is one of the best.

http://www.fd.lisboa.ucp.pt/site/custom/template/ucptplfac.asp?sspageID=3293&lang=2

The LL.M.'s programme have been recognized for two years in a row in the FT rankings, but more than that, it has perhaps the most amazing faculty - that any LL.M. offers., and the professors themselves recognize this. Professor Weiler, Poiaires Maduro, Armin von Bogdandy, Damian Chalmers, James Boyle, Daniel Halberstam, David Gerber, Eric A. Posner, Mattias Kumm, Neil Walker, Piet Eeckhout, Petros Mavroidis, Stephen Weatherill .... and the list goes on.

check out the programme:
http://www.fd.lisboa.ucp.pt/resources/documents/LL.M/LLM%20Law%20in%20a%20European%20and%20Global%20Context/2012-2013/LLM_LawEuropeanGlobalContext_LisbonCatolica.pdf

I finished this LL.M. last year and it was a great experience. I would be happy to give you my feedback and share my experiences there.
quote
Dodo36
I agree, it seems to be a good program. A lot of professors I met during my time in London, since they lecture at King's College.

While looking for good opportunities to take a postgraduate program, one should not forget about the University of St. Gallen and Zurich. Both offer good, but not cheap, programs. The St. Gallen program is an executive program, taking place during nine one week courses.
I agree, it seems to be a good program. A lot of professors I met during my time in London, since they lecture at King's College.

While looking for good opportunities to take a postgraduate program, one should not forget about the University of St. Gallen and Zurich. Both offer good, but not cheap, programs. The St. Gallen program is an executive program, taking place during nine one week courses.
quote

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