NY Bar Course in London


hellows
Where do I register with barbri in London ? I would like to take the lectures ect. full time.

Do I have to register for the NY Bar Exam myself or will they do it for me ? Or at least help me with registering for the exam.

If you could help me with this.
e-mail: hellows@o2.pl
Where do I register with barbri in London ? I would like to take the lectures ect. full time.

Do I have to register for the NY Bar Exam myself or will they do it for me ? Or at least help me with registering for the exam.

If you could help me with this.
e-mail: hellows@o2.pl
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trollsoft
Where do I register with barbri in London ? I would like to take the lectures ect. full time.

Do I have to register for the NY Bar Exam myself or will they do it for me ? Or at least help me with registering for the exam.

If you could help me with this.
e-mail: hellows@o2.pl


I don't know how you reg for barbri in London.
Barbri may give you info about registering for the NY bar exam, but the information is no more than what's on the website (http://www.nybarexam.org/), which is not that user friendly.
You have to register yourself. It's a pain, so brace yourself.
Good luck.
<blockquote>Where do I register with barbri in London ? I would like to take the lectures ect. full time.

Do I have to register for the NY Bar Exam myself or will they do it for me ? Or at least help me with registering for the exam.

If you could help me with this.
e-mail: hellows@o2.pl</blockquote>

I don't know how you reg for barbri in London.
Barbri may give you info about registering for the NY bar exam, but the information is no more than what's on the website (http://www.nybarexam.org/), which is not that user friendly.
You have to register yourself. It's a pain, so brace yourself.
Good luck.
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hellows
Its interesting . The exam cost you about $250 and the preperation course cost you £3000+ . maybe it is better not to take the course and prapere yourself. I know it will be 20 times more difficult but for the 3000 you can take the exam over and over again you you can finance your flight + accommodation.
What do you think ?
Its interesting . The exam cost you about $250 and the preperation course cost you £3000+ . maybe it is better not to take the course and prapere yourself. I know it will be 20 times more difficult but for the 3000 you can take the exam over and over again you you can finance your flight + accommodation.
What do you think ?
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smits
Hi guys,

I am taking the NY bar exam in July 08 -am from the UK and will be studying from home with material ordered from a "specialist" tutor.

Much to my annoyance, I see that I need to take the MPRE as well, will I able to sit for this in Aug 08 after the NY bar exams as I don't want to make an extra trip to NY just for the MPRE.

Thanks for any advice.
Hi guys,

I am taking the NY bar exam in July 08 -am from the UK and will be studying from home with material ordered from a "specialist" tutor.

Much to my annoyance, I see that I need to take the MPRE as well, will I able to sit for this in Aug 08 after the NY bar exams as I don't want to make an extra trip to NY just for the MPRE.

Thanks for any advice.
quote
zippete
Hi, I am from Ireland and I took and passed the New York Bar exam in Febuary 2007. I took a Bar Bri course in Ireland which lasted 5 months, it is possible to take the course at home by purchasing the dvds and materials, go to www.friarylaw.ie. Normally you are eligible to take the NY bar if you are eligible to take the professional law exams in your home jurisdiction ie if you are eligible to take the BVC you are eligible to take the bar exam (so long as you have a law degree and did not do a conversion course). It is a lot of work but 6 months to a year sounds like too much, the MPRE exam which follows 10 days after the main exam is not too difficult however it is required. We were able to take the bar exam in Manhatten but other foreign students sat it in Albany which is in upstate New York. You will have to go to Albany to be sworn which can be done roughly 5 months after you complete the exams, hope this of help
Hi, I am from Ireland and I took and passed the New York Bar exam in Febuary 2007. I took a Bar Bri course in Ireland which lasted 5 months, it is possible to take the course at home by purchasing the dvds and materials, go to www.friarylaw.ie. Normally you are eligible to take the NY bar if you are eligible to take the professional law exams in your home jurisdiction ie if you are eligible to take the BVC you are eligible to take the bar exam (so long as you have a law degree and did not do a conversion course). It is a lot of work but 6 months to a year sounds like too much, the MPRE exam which follows 10 days after the main exam is not too difficult however it is required. We were able to take the bar exam in Manhatten but other foreign students sat it in Albany which is in upstate New York. You will have to go to Albany to be sworn which can be done roughly 5 months after you complete the exams, hope this of help
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clonk
Hi, I am considering writing the New York Bar. You say its a lot of work "but 6 months to a year sounds like too much". How much/long preparation would u recommend then?
Hi, I am considering writing the New York Bar. You say its a lot of work "but 6 months to a year sounds like too much". How much/long preparation would u recommend then?
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zippete
We started the course in October and sat the exam in Febuary, I did about 15 hours a week before christmas, and then studied full-time between christmas and the exam
We started the course in October and sat the exam in Febuary, I did about 15 hours a week before christmas, and then studied full-time between christmas and the exam
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I just wanted to ask those who have taken the bar exam if it was worth it? I have an English LLB and was planning on taking the bar exam until I heard that even if I passed it, I would never get a legal job in New York because I have not gone to an American law school, and have not had an internship at an American law firm. So is taking the bar exam just adding an extra qualification which has no practical value?? How would one go about getting a job in the states post bar?

thanks!
I just wanted to ask those who have taken the bar exam if it was worth it? I have an English LLB and was planning on taking the bar exam until I heard that even if I passed it, I would never get a legal job in New York because I have not gone to an American law school, and have not had an internship at an American law firm. So is taking the bar exam just adding an extra qualification which has no practical value?? How would one go about getting a job in the states post bar?

thanks!
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zippete
It is difficult to get a job in New York without having gone to a U.S. Law School but it is possible. The more likely route is to qualify in New York and get a job in either London or Europe in a U.S. firm. It has an added value because firms regularly work with U.S. firms and New York law can be the basis of the contract. The best way to get a job in the U.S. would be to do an LL.M in a U.S. Law School after you have qualified. That way when the big law firms come around to the law fairs you are in a good position because you have already qualified and they do not have to take a risk on you failing the exam. American students do not normally take LL.Ms because they are already in too much debt from law school, however U.S. LL.Ms are very expensive. Hope this helps
It is difficult to get a job in New York without having gone to a U.S. Law School but it is possible. The more likely route is to qualify in New York and get a job in either London or Europe in a U.S. firm. It has an added value because firms regularly work with U.S. firms and New York law can be the basis of the contract. The best way to get a job in the U.S. would be to do an LL.M in a U.S. Law School after you have qualified. That way when the big law firms come around to the law fairs you are in a good position because you have already qualified and they do not have to take a risk on you failing the exam. American students do not normally take LL.Ms because they are already in too much debt from law school, however U.S. LL.Ms are very expensive. Hope this helps
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Craig
'Trollsoft' had earlier asked on this thread 'Where do I register with barbri in London' ?

I am also based in London and had the same query....Do barbri have a branch in London?

If not, most of lawyers based in London planning to sit for the NY Bar exam, which classes do they normally attend in London?

And if there are no good coaching classes to prepare for NY Bar exams for lawyers based in London (I am planning to sit for the NY Bar exam in Feb 2009), any suggestions as to which books to read without joining a coaching class?
'Trollsoft' had earlier asked on this thread 'Where do I register with barbri in London' ?

I am also based in London and had the same query....Do barbri have a branch in London?

If not, most of lawyers based in London planning to sit for the NY Bar exam, which classes do they normally attend in London?

And if there are no good coaching classes to prepare for NY Bar exams for lawyers based in London (I am planning to sit for the NY Bar exam in Feb 2009), any suggestions as to which books to read without joining a coaching class?
quote
Hi. I am currently on student visa in UK. I did my LL.B in UK; I am doing BVC now and will finish in May. After that I am planning to go to the NY Bar. But confusion that arises for me here is which type of visa should I apply for (as I am neither an UK national nor a national from a visa exempted country). Not sure if F1 student visa appropriate here as this is not a full-time education in strict sense.

Can anyone help on this issue?
Hi. I am currently on student visa in UK. I did my LL.B in UK; I am doing BVC now and will finish in May. After that I am planning to go to the NY Bar. But confusion that arises for me here is which type of visa should I apply for (as I am neither an UK national nor a national from a visa exempted country). Not sure if F1 student visa appropriate here as this is not a full-time education in strict sense.

Can anyone help on this issue?
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jeffson
F1 is definitely not appropriate. There is a school enrollment certification process required for an F1 visa. A visitor's visa is your easiest and most direct option.

While it is true that the US consulate in London has absolute discretion on whether or not to grant a visitor visa, if the consulate believes you are not attempting to immigrate and are attempting to go to the US to achieve a legitimate objective, they are very likely to grant the visa.

The best way to substantiate your legitimate purpose for travel to the US is to register for the NY bar exam and bring proof of your bar registration to your appointment at the US consulate. In the unlikely event that the US consulate rejects your request for a visitor visa, it is likely you would be allowed a near full refund of the NY bar exam registration fee.

Every state bar association permits advance registration several months prior to the exam. Thus you should register for the bar, then go to the consulate for your visa. Then after you are granted your visa, you should buy your bar preparation materials or enroll in your bar prep course.

All the best,
JE Henderson, JD
F1 is definitely not appropriate. There is a school enrollment certification process required for an F1 visa. A visitor's visa is your easiest and most direct option.

While it is true that the US consulate in London has absolute discretion on whether or not to grant a visitor visa, if the consulate believes you are not attempting to immigrate and are attempting to go to the US to achieve a legitimate objective, they are very likely to grant the visa.

The best way to substantiate your legitimate purpose for travel to the US is to register for the NY bar exam and bring proof of your bar registration to your appointment at the US consulate. In the unlikely event that the US consulate rejects your request for a visitor visa, it is likely you would be allowed a near full refund of the NY bar exam registration fee.

Every state bar association permits advance registration several months prior to the exam. Thus you should register for the bar, then go to the consulate for your visa. Then after you are granted your visa, you should buy your bar preparation materials or enroll in your bar prep course.

All the best,
JE Henderson, JD
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Ngô
Hi. I'm researching the NY bar exam prep courses and stumbled upon this thread. I have a LL.B from a UK university and considering sitting the NY bar exam in Feb 2010. I believe that a few institutions offer prep courses for the NY bar in London:

- CLT Bar/bri (http://www.clt.co.uk/default.aspx?id=254);
- Holborn (http://www.flexible-learning.co.uk/); and
- BPP (http://www.bppprofessionaldevelopment.com/new-york-bar/).

Has anyone taken one of the above courses and if so what are your thoughts on it? I would prefer to go to lectures however the BPP lectures are via DVDs...

Originally I had planned on going to NY to take the Barbri and I'm happy to see that there are options closer to home but would prefer to pay the extra money if there is a better chance of passing the exam the first time round.

Thanks.
Hi. I'm researching the NY bar exam prep courses and stumbled upon this thread. I have a LL.B from a UK university and considering sitting the NY bar exam in Feb 2010. I believe that a few institutions offer prep courses for the NY bar in London:

- CLT Bar/bri (http://www.clt.co.uk/default.aspx?id=254);
- Holborn (http://www.flexible-learning.co.uk/); and
- BPP (http://www.bppprofessionaldevelopment.com/new-york-bar/).

Has anyone taken one of the above courses and if so what are your thoughts on it? I would prefer to go to lectures however the BPP lectures are via DVDs...

Originally I had planned on going to NY to take the Barbri and I'm happy to see that there are options closer to home but would prefer to pay the extra money if there is a better chance of passing the exam the first time round.

Thanks.
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uklawyer
The providers Ngo has identified do indeed seem to be the only legitimate providers of the NY bar exam in the UK.

Has anyone here actually taken (and preferably passed the NY bar exam in the UK?

If so, would you mind if I emailed you a few questions? I want to sign up for the July exams but really need to justify the expense to myself.

Many thanks.
The providers Ngo has identified do indeed seem to be the only legitimate providers of the NY bar exam in the UK.

Has anyone here actually taken (and preferably passed the NY bar exam in the UK?

If so, would you mind if I emailed you a few questions? I want to sign up for the July exams but really need to justify the expense to myself.

Many thanks.
quote
kwt901
Hi uklawyer,

Have you signed up for the July exam and taken a preparatory course in London? If yes, how did you find the course?
Hi uklawyer,

Have you signed up for the July exam and taken a preparatory course in London? If yes, how did you find the course?
quote
Hey all. Having taken the New York bar (albeit after getting an American JD), I would definitely recommend doing some sort of formalized study program. While it is theoretically possible to study on your own and pass, if you don't have something that guides you to what is important and what is more peripheral, it will take much more time and be a lot harder remain focused. I'm not saying that you need to do a formal course like Bar/Bri - there are probably some good books-based study programs out there, but don't assume that you can buy the Bar/Bri books off of ebay and just use those - the books are designed to be used with the lectures, so you'll be missing something.

As for the question of whether it is better to save the money from taking a study course and just retake the exam if you fail, I would personally say that this is being penny wise and pound foolish - the test is offered only twice a year, so you lose a substantial amount of time waiting to retake it, plus many employers ask about whether you have taken/passed the bar, so they may not look kindly on someone who had to take it x times to pass. I would say that you should probably figure the cost of prep into the cost of the exam, so that if you can't pay for the prep, you just shouldn't take the test.

As for what I did to study, there was not a live Bar/Bri course where I was living at the time that I was studying. I looked into a few options (e.g., the self-study Bar/Bri which was done on CD at that time, etc.). I ended up doing the Pieper Bar Review DVDs and books. It used the lectures from the live course for the previous sitting of the exam. It was about the same cost as Bar/Bri, but at the time had DVDs instead of just CDs (not sure what Bar/Bri is doing now).

Anyway, I don't mean to overplay this - while I think it is important to study in some organized way, I don't think you *have* to do one of the lecture-based courses if you have the discipline to do something else on your own. Also, it is definitely possible to go overboard - you don't need to spend six months studying or anything like that. But the happy medium may be more difficult to find without taking a study course.
Hey all. Having taken the New York bar (albeit after getting an American JD), I would definitely recommend doing some sort of formalized study program. While it is theoretically possible to study on your own and pass, if you don't have something that guides you to what is important and what is more peripheral, it will take much more time and be a lot harder remain focused. I'm not saying that you need to do a formal course like Bar/Bri - there are probably some good books-based study programs out there, but don't assume that you can buy the Bar/Bri books off of ebay and just use those - the books are designed to be used with the lectures, so you'll be missing something.

As for the question of whether it is better to save the money from taking a study course and just retake the exam if you fail, I would personally say that this is being penny wise and pound foolish - the test is offered only twice a year, so you lose a substantial amount of time waiting to retake it, plus many employers ask about whether you have taken/passed the bar, so they may not look kindly on someone who had to take it x times to pass. I would say that you should probably figure the cost of prep into the cost of the exam, so that if you can't pay for the prep, you just shouldn't take the test.

As for what I did to study, there was not a live Bar/Bri course where I was living at the time that I was studying. I looked into a few options (e.g., the self-study Bar/Bri which was done on CD at that time, etc.). I ended up doing the Pieper Bar Review DVDs and books. It used the lectures from the live course for the previous sitting of the exam. It was about the same cost as Bar/Bri, but at the time had DVDs instead of just CDs (not sure what Bar/Bri is doing now).

Anyway, I don't mean to overplay this - while I think it is important to study in some organized way, I don't think you *have* to do one of the lecture-based courses if you have the discipline to do something else on your own. Also, it is definitely possible to go overboard - you don't need to spend six months studying or anything like that. But the happy medium may be more difficult to find without taking a study course.
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kwt901
Hi NYC_Charles,

I've never studied the American law and I'm planning to take a preparatory course in London. What I'm thinking is whether I should attend the exam in July 2010 if the course starts only in May. Could you please share how long you took to make your preparation before taking the NY bar exam? Thanks.
Hi NYC_Charles,

I've never studied the American law and I'm planning to take a preparatory course in London. What I'm thinking is whether I should attend the exam in July 2010 if the course starts only in May. Could you please share how long you took to make your preparation before taking the NY bar exam? Thanks.
quote
May to July should definitely be fine (in theory). The live version of the course I did met from late May through mid July and then they assume you study on your own for the last week before the exam.
May to July should definitely be fine (in theory). The live version of the course I did met from late May through mid July and then they assume you study on your own for the last week before the exam.
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kwt901
Thank you very much, NYC_Charles.
Thank you very much, NYC_Charles.
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lsbarton
Hi all

I'm very interested in the New York Bar. I have already completed an LLB, and the BVC in UK. Plus have completed Pupillage.

The Barbri and Holborn College courses are not near enough for me to attend, so all study will be long distance. Is it really worth spending £3000, for the material, when I can't attend the lectures anyway??

Is it correct I can buy them, say on ebay- along with last years lecture notes/DVD and simply revise myself?

Unfortunately Ive booked my holidays this year and I'm going to NY in August, so will miss the July exam, but will go February to take the exam, leaving me plenty of time to study.

Can anyone assist??

Also, if anyone has recently passed the exam, can they email me with regard to purchasing their material, labarton68@hotmail.com

Thanks
Hi all

I'm very interested in the New York Bar. I have already completed an LLB, and the BVC in UK. Plus have completed Pupillage.

The Barbri and Holborn College courses are not near enough for me to attend, so all study will be long distance. Is it really worth spending £3000, for the material, when I can't attend the lectures anyway??

Is it correct I can buy them, say on ebay- along with last years lecture notes/DVD and simply revise myself?

Unfortunately Ive booked my holidays this year and I'm going to NY in August, so will miss the July exam, but will go February to take the exam, leaving me plenty of time to study.

Can anyone assist??

Also, if anyone has recently passed the exam, can they email me with regard to purchasing their material, labarton68@hotmail.com

Thanks
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