Undergrad law: ANU vs University of Sydney


gavel
Hi there.

I've been accepted into both the ANU and USyd LLB programmes starting in March 2009. I understand that USyd is perceived to be the more prestigious law school locally but ANU is better known internationally.

Right now I'm inclined towards ANU because I hear the intake is smaller than USyd's and the classes are more personal ie you get more individual attention. Moreover, it is not as competitive as USyd which takes the very best students from NSW hence, other factors being equal, there's a possibility I might do better at ANU than at USyd - there's no point going to the more prestigious school and getting mediocre grades when I could be getting better grades at the less prestigious school.

In a nutshell, I'm putting precedence on the quality of teaching and the possibility of getting better grades over prestige. Am I being silly here? I'm a mature age student (25) and would eventually like to go into community law or NGO type of work. I have no problems living in either Canberra or Sydney. I have to make a decision really soon - help! Would really appreciate input from students actually studying at these two institutions.
Hi there.

I've been accepted into both the ANU and USyd LLB programmes starting in March 2009. I understand that USyd is perceived to be the more prestigious law school locally but ANU is better known internationally.

Right now I'm inclined towards ANU because I hear the intake is smaller than USyd's and the classes are more personal ie you get more individual attention. Moreover, it is not as competitive as USyd which takes the very best students from NSW hence, other factors being equal, there's a possibility I might do better at ANU than at USyd - there's no point going to the more prestigious school and getting mediocre grades when I could be getting better grades at the less prestigious school.

In a nutshell, I'm putting precedence on the quality of teaching and the possibility of getting better grades over prestige. Am I being silly here? I'm a mature age student (25) and would eventually like to go into community law or NGO type of work. I have no problems living in either Canberra or Sydney. I have to make a decision really soon - help! Would really appreciate input from students actually studying at these two institutions.
quote
Gregor2009
I have attended several law schools in australia (either towards my degrees or as a cross-insitutional student). I can say for one that ANU is a good institution but Canberra is absolutely boring! I am not sure on what basis you are indicating that you have no problems living in Canberra but I would recommend going down for a week to see if it is bearable for you - it wasn't for me.

Personally, I would attend USyd. The career prospects for a graduate in NSW/Victoria is much better if you eventually decide to remain in Australia. Also, there are many Australians who desperately want to have a law degree from USyd but cannot enter. The entry requirements for ANU is much much lower - USyd is one of the leaders in legal education and has a long history (generally as a university).

At the end of the day, law relies alot on on self-study so i wouldnt' worry too much about the 'attention' thing. I can't really comment on the attention given to each students. however, my impression was that USyd delivers its courses in small seminar groups while ANU had them in large lecture halls. I might be wrong on this though!! Please double/triple check this with the Faculty.


Cheers,
G
I have attended several law schools in australia (either towards my degrees or as a cross-insitutional student). I can say for one that ANU is a good institution but Canberra is absolutely boring! I am not sure on what basis you are indicating that you have no problems living in Canberra but I would recommend going down for a week to see if it is bearable for you - it wasn't for me.

Personally, I would attend USyd. The career prospects for a graduate in NSW/Victoria is much better if you eventually decide to remain in Australia. Also, there are many Australians who desperately want to have a law degree from USyd but cannot enter. The entry requirements for ANU is much much lower - USyd is one of the leaders in legal education and has a long history (generally as a university).

At the end of the day, law relies alot on on self-study so i wouldnt' worry too much about the 'attention' thing. I can't really comment on the attention given to each students. however, my impression was that USyd delivers its courses in small seminar groups while ANU had them in large lecture halls. I might be wrong on this though!! Please double/triple check this with the Faculty.


Cheers,
G
quote
notheless
Hi, sorry i'm not come in to answer. i just wondering have you guys heard that if some have finished a LLB before,he can require exemp some courses in several famous AU universitis which means the three year llb courses can be shorten to two years. is that true? what condition should i have if i'm going to apply the course exemption? Now i'm swinging between sevral programs. since i'm also mature enough. In addtion, gavel ,if you glad to do so,could you tell me how you got the admission?your ielts scores? your gpa? or some other outstanding condition?
thanks
Hi, sorry i'm not come in to answer. i just wondering have you guys heard that if some have finished a LLB before,he can require exemp some courses in several famous AU universitis which means the three year llb courses can be shorten to two years. is that true? what condition should i have if i'm going to apply the course exemption? Now i'm swinging between sevral programs. since i'm also mature enough. In addtion, gavel ,if you glad to do so,could you tell me how you got the admission?your ielts scores? your gpa? or some other outstanding condition?
thanks
quote
Gregor2009
Hello,

It is true that if you have a LLB from another jurisdiction you MAY be able to shorten your Australian LLB studies. The exact extent would depend on a case-by-case basis.

I know for a fact that some Australian universities are willing to consider granting exemption/credit towards the elective component of the LLB degree based on an LLB from a foreign jurisdiction (i.e. you only complete the compulsory components). The amount of exemption/credit would depend on whether your LLB is from a common law or civil law jurisdiction. LLBs from common law jurisdictions like UK would normally obtain a higher amount of exemption.

Of course, the amount of credit they can give would also be constraint by universities rules (most university require students to complete 50% in the institution). In other words, exemption/credits are usually capped at 50%. If you don't mind not having an Australian LLB, you can always enrol in subjects on a non-award (bridging basis).

Do double-check this information.

Cheers,
G
Hello,

It is true that if you have a LLB from another jurisdiction you MAY be able to shorten your Australian LLB studies. The exact extent would depend on a case-by-case basis.

I know for a fact that some Australian universities are willing to consider granting exemption/credit towards the elective component of the LLB degree based on an LLB from a foreign jurisdiction (i.e. you only complete the compulsory components). The amount of exemption/credit would depend on whether your LLB is from a common law or civil law jurisdiction. LLBs from common law jurisdictions like UK would normally obtain a higher amount of exemption.

Of course, the amount of credit they can give would also be constraint by universities rules (most university require students to complete 50% in the institution). In other words, exemption/credits are usually capped at 50%. If you don't mind not having an Australian LLB, you can always enrol in subjects on a non-award (bridging basis).

Do double-check this information.

Cheers,
G
quote
I have attended several law schools in australia (either towards my degrees or as a cross-insitutional student). I can say for one that ANU is a good institution but Canberra is absolutely boring! I am not sure on what basis you are indicating that you have no problems living in Canberra but I would recommend going down for a week to see if it is bearable for you - it wasn't for me.

Personally, I would attend USyd. The career prospects for a graduate in NSW/Victoria is much better if you eventually decide to remain in Australia. Also, there are many Australians who desperately want to have a law degree from USyd but cannot enter. The entry requirements for ANU is much much lower - USyd is one of the leaders in legal education and has a long history (generally as a university).

At the end of the day, law relies alot on on self-study so i wouldnt' worry too much about the 'attention' thing. I can't really comment on the attention given to each students. however, my impression was that USyd delivers its courses in small seminar groups while ANU had them in large lecture halls. I might be wrong on this though!! Please double/triple check this with the Faculty.


Cheers,
G


I appreciate that this response is rather late, but i've just transferred from USyd to ANU this year and am in my third year of a BSc/LLB program. I can assure you that USyd classes are way way way larger than ANU classes.
Contrary to what G has said - ANU does not teach courses in large lecture halls - their lecture sizes are only about 60-90 max (Ive also found that they often have many repeats of lectures) and have seminar groups of about 16 students. One of my tutes last semester in fact only had 12 students. First year teaching, for example in Foundations is conducted largely by seminars only.
The USyd law course is certainly in higher demand, and you do require higher marks to get in, and consequently I found their classes were very large and often overpacked. Also, many tutes were taught by graduate students and not the course convenors or academics. I have, however, found the standard at the ANU alot higher - because of the smaller cohort here, the lecturers and tutors do demand alot more from you as a student and the work load does seem more intense. This however, could be because I have moved on from second to third year - it has indeed been a big jump. I personally did not expect this coming from USyd - boy was I wrong!
<blockquote>I have attended several law schools in australia (either towards my degrees or as a cross-insitutional student). I can say for one that ANU is a good institution but Canberra is absolutely boring! I am not sure on what basis you are indicating that you have no problems living in Canberra but I would recommend going down for a week to see if it is bearable for you - it wasn't for me.

Personally, I would attend USyd. The career prospects for a graduate in NSW/Victoria is much better if you eventually decide to remain in Australia. Also, there are many Australians who desperately want to have a law degree from USyd but cannot enter. The entry requirements for ANU is much much lower - USyd is one of the leaders in legal education and has a long history (generally as a university).

At the end of the day, law relies alot on on self-study so i wouldnt' worry too much about the 'attention' thing. I can't really comment on the attention given to each students. however, my impression was that USyd delivers its courses in small seminar groups while ANU had them in large lecture halls. I might be wrong on this though!! Please double/triple check this with the Faculty.


Cheers,
G</blockquote>

I appreciate that this response is rather late, but i've just transferred from USyd to ANU this year and am in my third year of a BSc/LLB program. I can assure you that USyd classes are way way way larger than ANU classes.
Contrary to what G has said - ANU does not teach courses in large lecture halls - their lecture sizes are only about 60-90 max (Ive also found that they often have many repeats of lectures) and have seminar groups of about 16 students. One of my tutes last semester in fact only had 12 students. First year teaching, for example in Foundations is conducted largely by seminars only.
The USyd law course is certainly in higher demand, and you do require higher marks to get in, and consequently I found their classes were very large and often overpacked. Also, many tutes were taught by graduate students and not the course convenors or academics. I have, however, found the standard at the ANU alot higher - because of the smaller cohort here, the lecturers and tutors do demand alot more from you as a student and the work load does seem more intense. This however, could be because I have moved on from second to third year - it has indeed been a big jump. I personally did not expect this coming from USyd - boy was I wrong!
quote
Gregor2009
Sorry about that! :) Re the class size of ANU :)
Sorry about that! :) Re the class size of ANU :)

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