Bar Exam in Australia


jenay15
hi clint,
I am in a similar position to you. however i have not started taking the subjects that i need to. I am on a kenyan passport which makes it a little difficult to get a student visa for australia as i have to be on a full time course. unfortunately the LPAB is not recognised for visa purposes so i cannot complete my subjects with them. where are you doing your subjects? I have been trying to look for a university that will let me do the certain subjects that I need to do but again as it will not be full time I will not be able to get a student visa. If you know anywhere I can complete the subjects please let me know!
Thanks
Jaini

Hi Gavin,

If i am not wrong, you do not have to take the LPC in UK as the PLT in Australia will suffice. However, if you were to complete the LPC in UK, NSW might exempt you from some subjects within the Australian PLT. I am not sure how generous NSW is when it comes to granting exemptions but they do consider exemptions if you are able to demonstrate having prior PLT knowledge (in your case the LPC).

Hopet his helps!


Best Regards
Greg


Dear All

I might be a little further along the process than some, but may be able to shed some light. I have a UK qualifying law degree from the UK and having applied for exemptions with NSW LPAB (admission board) I was advised i'd have to study 12 addtional units, with an LLB you'll be looking at 6-8. The LPC would exempt you from all subjects bar Constitiational Law, then following this you're required to do the PLT essentially 6 months - 3 study/3 work exp and then you're qualified. (most of this info can be found on the lawlink site)

The reason i found myself reading this blog is that i'm in the process of appealing to the LPAB for more exemptions, as after completing 5 of the subjects in the last few months I relised i might have been alittle quick to accept the decision. I've heard of people only having to do 3-6 subjects with an LLB. The LPAB have essentially equated the BA law with the CPE from the UK it would seem...

You may know that many unis in the UK such as Oxbridge only offer BA law degrees, the difference between my degree and most LLBs is 1-2 elective subjects so i'm going to ask my uni to contact the LPAB and make the case.

I would love to know what subjects any of you have been exempted from if you have applied yet. It seems that the exemption criteria used by the board lacks transparency and consistency.

Thanks in advance

Clint

hi clint,
I am in a similar position to you. however i have not started taking the subjects that i need to. I am on a kenyan passport which makes it a little difficult to get a student visa for australia as i have to be on a full time course. unfortunately the LPAB is not recognised for visa purposes so i cannot complete my subjects with them. where are you doing your subjects? I have been trying to look for a university that will let me do the certain subjects that I need to do but again as it will not be full time I will not be able to get a student visa. If you know anywhere I can complete the subjects please let me know!
Thanks
Jaini

<blockquote><blockquote>Hi Gavin,

If i am not wrong, you do not have to take the LPC in UK as the PLT in Australia will suffice. However, if you were to complete the LPC in UK, NSW might exempt you from some subjects within the Australian PLT. I am not sure how generous NSW is when it comes to granting exemptions but they do consider exemptions if you are able to demonstrate having prior PLT knowledge (in your case the LPC).

Hopet his helps!


Best Regards
Greg</blockquote>

Dear All

I might be a little further along the process than some, but may be able to shed some light. I have a UK qualifying law degree from the UK and having applied for exemptions with NSW LPAB (admission board) I was advised i'd have to study 12 addtional units, with an LLB you'll be looking at 6-8. The LPC would exempt you from all subjects bar Constitiational Law, then following this you're required to do the PLT essentially 6 months - 3 study/3 work exp and then you're qualified. (most of this info can be found on the lawlink site)

The reason i found myself reading this blog is that i'm in the process of appealing to the LPAB for more exemptions, as after completing 5 of the subjects in the last few months I relised i might have been alittle quick to accept the decision. I've heard of people only having to do 3-6 subjects with an LLB. The LPAB have essentially equated the BA law with the CPE from the UK it would seem...

You may know that many unis in the UK such as Oxbridge only offer BA law degrees, the difference between my degree and most LLBs is 1-2 elective subjects so i'm going to ask my uni to contact the LPAB and make the case.

I would love to know what subjects any of you have been exempted from if you have applied yet. It seems that the exemption criteria used by the board lacks transparency and consistency.

Thanks in advance

Clint

</blockquote>
quote
Gregor2009
Jaini

You can enrol in the subjects you require and add on 1 or 2 more "elective" courses to your enrolment to make your studies full time.

This was what some of my overseas classmates did back in law school - do explore this option!

Cheers,
G
Jaini

You can enrol in the subjects you require and add on 1 or 2 more "elective" courses to your enrolment to make your studies full time.

This was what some of my overseas classmates did back in law school - do explore this option!

Cheers,
G
quote
Jian
Hi,

I have a LLB from New Zealand. How many papers would I have to take to be able to sit the qualifying exams in Australia? I have not done commercial law or civil proceedure. Are there training schools that will allow me to prepare without going back to university?
Hi,

I have a LLB from New Zealand. How many papers would I have to take to be able to sit the qualifying exams in Australia? I have not done commercial law or civil proceedure. Are there training schools that will allow me to prepare without going back to university?
quote
Gregor2009
as far as I am aware, if you are admitted in NZ, you can apply for mutual recognition/admission to Australia. I think you should look into this route (rather than not be admitted in NZ and then having to study for extra courses to be admitted in AU).
as far as I am aware, if you are admitted in NZ, you can apply for mutual recognition/admission to Australia. I think you should look into this route (rather than not be admitted in NZ and then having to study for extra courses to be admitted in AU).
quote
jiko
hi, i have completed my LLB from University of London ( External Program), i need to know .......

1. what are the requirement to do "Bar at Law" Course in Australia?
2. is IELTS is mandatory ?
3. is there is any requirement in results of LLB?
4. what is about the cost of Bar-at-law in AUSTRALIA?
hi, i have completed my LLB from University of London ( External Program), i need to know .......

1. what are the requirement to do "Bar at Law" Course in Australia?
2. is IELTS is mandatory ?
3. is there is any requirement in results of LLB?
4. what is about the cost of Bar-at-law in AUSTRALIA?
quote
Dear All,

one good source of tranferability of qualifications is the College of Law site: www.collaw.edu.au

It may be worthwhile considering the eligibility for practice requirements in all of the states and terrritories of Australia. They have different requirements. Once admission is gained in any one it is a simple matter to transfer across to the the desired state/territory.

Admission in the Australian Capital Territory can be easier for some than it is in New South Wales. Try them all and see.

Furthermore, the examinations in the Legal Practitioners Board Exams in NSW are the most hardest of all law exams in Australia and the course has a reputation for having a failure rate of about 98%, ie only 2% of students get through. Some individual sunbjects have had failure rates of in excess of 70% (torts) my view is that you are better off seeking to do exams via Universities. Nevertheless, the exams for the LPAB are very cheap.

The practical element may also be completed via the ANU and most of that can be completed online. The ANU advantage is that the course provides an option where only 20 days practical experience is required as opposed to the 15 weeks requirement of the NSW College of Law (although I believe that can now be reduced to 11 weeks).
Dear All,

one good source of tranferability of qualifications is the College of Law site: www.collaw.edu.au

It may be worthwhile considering the eligibility for practice requirements in all of the states and terrritories of Australia. They have different requirements. Once admission is gained in any one it is a simple matter to transfer across to the the desired state/territory.

Admission in the Australian Capital Territory can be easier for some than it is in New South Wales. Try them all and see.

Furthermore, the examinations in the Legal Practitioners Board Exams in NSW are the most hardest of all law exams in Australia and the course has a reputation for having a failure rate of about 98%, ie only 2% of students get through. Some individual sunbjects have had failure rates of in excess of 70% (torts) my view is that you are better off seeking to do exams via Universities. Nevertheless, the exams for the LPAB are very cheap.

The practical element may also be completed via the ANU and most of that can be completed online. The ANU advantage is that the course provides an option where only 20 days practical experience is required as opposed to the 15 weeks requirement of the NSW College of Law (although I believe that can now be reduced to 11 weeks).




quote
mikado
Hi all,

I've read the thread and had a look at Judge Dredd's link but I'm still a little lost.

I have a French law degree (civil law) which qualifies for the French bar though I haven't sat the exam yet. I plan to sit the NY Bar Exam directly.

1. Once qualified as a laywer in NY with an LLM and a French LLB, what are the requirements to be admitted in Australia?

2. If I don't do the LLM in the US and don't qualify for a Bar overseas, I understand from the College of Law site that I would have to take various courses from their Institution to qualify.
- Is this true?
- Are these exams really hard?
- I don't have to attend an Australian University?
- How long does it usually take to complete these courses?
- Do you get a visa to live in Australia? Is it possible to work while completing these courses?

A lot of questions... I hope someone can answer a few...

Thanks in advance!
Hi all,

I've read the thread and had a look at Judge Dredd's link but I'm still a little lost.

I have a French law degree (civil law) which qualifies for the French bar though I haven't sat the exam yet. I plan to sit the NY Bar Exam directly.

1. Once qualified as a laywer in NY with an LLM and a French LLB, what are the requirements to be admitted in Australia?

2. If I don't do the LLM in the US and don't qualify for a Bar overseas, I understand from the College of Law site that I would have to take various courses from their Institution to qualify.
- Is this true?
- Are these exams really hard?
- I don't have to attend an Australian University?
- How long does it usually take to complete these courses?
- Do you get a visa to live in Australia? Is it possible to work while completing these courses?

A lot of questions... I hope someone can answer a few...

Thanks in advance!
quote
Gregor2009
Hope this helps mikado:

1. Once qualified as a laywer in NY with an LLM and a French LLB, what are the requirements to be admitted in Australia?

You will need to complete courses with LLB/JD students. As your law degree is a civil degree, you will be required to complete majority of the compulsory courses (e.g. torts, contracts, property, civil procedure etc). You will likely be exempted from the elective component on the basis of your LLB/LLM studies. If you take basic US law subjects in your LLM studies (i.e. JD subjects), you *may* reduce the number of subjects you need to take.

2. If I don't do the LLM in the US and don't qualify for a Bar overseas, I understand from the College of Law site that I would have to take various courses from their Institution to qualify. - Is this true? - Are these exams really hard? - I don't have to attend an Australian University?

In addition to fulfilling academic requirements (which is done in Universities), you will usually need to take practical legal training courses either through the College of Law or a university. Some States are happy to exempt applicants from certain subjects/requirements on the basis of prior education/professional experience but this would be on a case-by-case basis, subject to assessment.

- How long does it usually take to complete these courses? - Do you get a visa to live in Australia? Is it possible to work while completing these courses?

Yes, you can work while on a student visa but limited hours. In order to qualify for a student visa, you need to study full-time on campus. There are, however, providers providing the LLB/JD subjects online and the practical training course online so you technically do not have to be in Australia.

I hope this helps - please double-check the information as some details might not be up-to-date!

Cheers
Gregory
Hope this helps mikado:

1. Once qualified as a laywer in NY with an LLM and a French LLB, what are the requirements to be admitted in Australia?

You will need to complete courses with LLB/JD students. As your law degree is a civil degree, you will be required to complete majority of the compulsory courses (e.g. torts, contracts, property, civil procedure etc). You will likely be exempted from the elective component on the basis of your LLB/LLM studies. If you take basic US law subjects in your LLM studies (i.e. JD subjects), you *may* reduce the number of subjects you need to take.

2. If I don't do the LLM in the US and don't qualify for a Bar overseas, I understand from the College of Law site that I would have to take various courses from their Institution to qualify. - Is this true? - Are these exams really hard? - I don't have to attend an Australian University?

In addition to fulfilling academic requirements (which is done in Universities), you will usually need to take practical legal training courses either through the College of Law or a university. Some States are happy to exempt applicants from certain subjects/requirements on the basis of prior education/professional experience but this would be on a case-by-case basis, subject to assessment.

- How long does it usually take to complete these courses? - Do you get a visa to live in Australia? Is it possible to work while completing these courses?

Yes, you can work while on a student visa but limited hours. In order to qualify for a student visa, you need to study full-time on campus. There are, however, providers providing the LLB/JD subjects online and the practical training course online so you technically do not have to be in Australia.

I hope this helps - please double-check the information as some details might not be up-to-date!

Cheers
Gregory
quote
mikado
Hi Gregor,

Thank you very much for your response.

I see it's quite complicated to practice in Australia for a foreign lawyer... I was hoping that a common law qualified lawyer would only need to pass some kind of exam comprising major australian law subjects.

Too bad, I guess it may be better to work over there for an international law firm further on. I don't see myself going through a complete JD.

Thanks again.
Hi Gregor,

Thank you very much for your response.

I see it's quite complicated to practice in Australia for a foreign lawyer... I was hoping that a common law qualified lawyer would only need to pass some kind of exam comprising major australian law subjects.

Too bad, I guess it may be better to work over there for an international law firm further on. I don't see myself going through a complete JD.

Thanks again.
quote
Ok Hi Everyone

I'm 13 yrs and would really like to know how I can become a lawyer in Australia even though I am planning to study in the UK and please answer in simple context

Thanks in advance
Mahad
Ok Hi Everyone

I'm 13 yrs and would really like to know how I can become a lawyer in Australia even though I am planning to study in the UK and please answer in simple context

Thanks in advance
Mahad
quote
Ok Hi Everyone

I'm 13 yrs and would really like to know how I can become a lawyer in Australia even though I am planning to study in the UK and please answer in simple context

Thanks in advance
Mahad
Ok Hi Everyone

I'm 13 yrs and would really like to know how I can become a lawyer in Australia even though I am planning to study in the UK and please answer in simple context

Thanks in advance
Mahad
quote
Hi Gavin,

If i am not wrong, you do not have to take the LPC in UK as the PLT in Australia will suffice. However, if you were to complete the LPC in UK, NSW might exempt you from some subjects within the Australian PLT. I am not sure how generous NSW is when it comes to granting exemptions but they do consider exemptions if you are able to demonstrate having prior PLT knowledge (in your case the LPC).

Hopet his helps!


Best Regards
Greg


Dear All

I might be a little further along the process than some, but may be able to shed some light. I have a UK qualifying law degree from the UK and having applied for exemptions with NSW LPAB (admission board) I was advised i'd have to study 12 addtional units, with an LLB you'll be looking at 6-8. The LPC would exempt you from all subjects bar Constitiational Law, then following this you're required to do the PLT essentially 6 months - 3 study/3 work exp and then you're qualified. (most of this info can be found on the lawlink site)

The reason i found myself reading this blog is that i'm in the process of appealing to the LPAB for more exemptions, as after completing 5 of the subjects in the last few months I relised i might have been alittle quick to accept the decision. I've heard of people only having to do 3-6 subjects with an LLB. The LPAB have essentially equated the BA law with the CPE from the UK it would seem...

You may know that many unis in the UK such as Oxbridge only offer BA law degrees, the difference between my degree and most LLBs is 1-2 elective subjects so i'm going to ask my uni to contact the LPAB and make the case.

I would love to know what subjects any of you have been exempted from if you have applied yet. It seems that the exemption criteria used by the board lacks transparency and consistency.

Thanks in advance

Clint



Hi Clint,

Just wondering what did you mean by having being advised to take 12 additional units and with an LLB, you will be looking at 6 to 8. So which is which?

I have a Qualifying Law Degree as well and have applied to LPAB to assess my academic transcipts to advise what are the additional subjects I am required to 'top up'. I do hope it's just a few because I heard that graduates with our qualifications are only required to take 'Public Law', which is their Administrative and Constitutional Law... And maybe pair up with Legal Ethics or Professional Conduct or something.

I do not understand when you meant that you were advised to take 12 additional subjects and have completed 5 of them and some others had only do 3 to 6 subjects. Does this mean that the advice provided by LPAB is inaccurate?? Or perhaps the LLBs were from other countries/jurisdictions, or maybe they have undertaken certain subjects which you did not and is required or either that, the differing grades could be an issue as well?
<blockquote><blockquote>Hi Gavin,

If i am not wrong, you do not have to take the LPC in UK as the PLT in Australia will suffice. However, if you were to complete the LPC in UK, NSW might exempt you from some subjects within the Australian PLT. I am not sure how generous NSW is when it comes to granting exemptions but they do consider exemptions if you are able to demonstrate having prior PLT knowledge (in your case the LPC).

Hopet his helps!


Best Regards
Greg</blockquote>

Dear All

I might be a little further along the process than some, but may be able to shed some light. I have a UK qualifying law degree from the UK and having applied for exemptions with NSW LPAB (admission board) I was advised i'd have to study 12 addtional units, with an LLB you'll be looking at 6-8. The LPC would exempt you from all subjects bar Constitiational Law, then following this you're required to do the PLT essentially 6 months - 3 study/3 work exp and then you're qualified. (most of this info can be found on the lawlink site)

The reason i found myself reading this blog is that i'm in the process of appealing to the LPAB for more exemptions, as after completing 5 of the subjects in the last few months I relised i might have been alittle quick to accept the decision. I've heard of people only having to do 3-6 subjects with an LLB. The LPAB have essentially equated the BA law with the CPE from the UK it would seem...

You may know that many unis in the UK such as Oxbridge only offer BA law degrees, the difference between my degree and most LLBs is 1-2 elective subjects so i'm going to ask my uni to contact the LPAB and make the case.

I would love to know what subjects any of you have been exempted from if you have applied yet. It seems that the exemption criteria used by the board lacks transparency and consistency.

Thanks in advance

Clint

</blockquote>

Hi Clint,

Just wondering what did you mean by having being advised to take 12 additional units and with an LLB, you will be looking at 6 to 8. So which is which?

I have a Qualifying Law Degree as well and have applied to LPAB to assess my academic transcipts to advise what are the additional subjects I am required to 'top up'. I do hope it's just a few because I heard that graduates with our qualifications are only required to take 'Public Law', which is their Administrative and Constitutional Law... And maybe pair up with Legal Ethics or Professional Conduct or something.

I do not understand when you meant that you were advised to take 12 additional subjects and have completed 5 of them and some others had only do 3 to 6 subjects. Does this mean that the advice provided by LPAB is inaccurate?? Or perhaps the LLBs were from other countries/jurisdictions, or maybe they have undertaken certain subjects which you did not and is required or either that, the differing grades could be an issue as well?
quote
I have received news from LPAB NSW and they require me to take additional 12 subjects, the same situation Clint is in.
Judging on that, all the subjects which I had attained a 'C' for in my UOL LLB, is under one of the required subjects to undertake. Hope this helps to shed some light for those interested.

I am actually quite dissatisfied with LPAB's determination. 12 subjects is ALOT and it seems no difference than taking another LLB. I won't be able to register myself as a Student-at-Law for the joint venture course by LPAB and Uni of Sydney because I am not living in Australia and plans to undertake distance education. I have checked out the accredited Unis and only 2 of them offer distance education - University of New England and Southern Cross University. The fees per subject is AUD$2000++ and multiplying by 12 subjects, that amount can be used to complete my current LLM or for another LLB/degree.

I am not sure if I would want them to review their determination again. What are the chances? And should I really undertake this route? Is it worth? :(
I have received news from LPAB NSW and they require me to take additional 12 subjects, the same situation Clint is in.
Judging on that, all the subjects which I had attained a 'C' for in my UOL LLB, is under one of the required subjects to undertake. Hope this helps to shed some light for those interested.

I am actually quite dissatisfied with LPAB's determination. 12 subjects is ALOT and it seems no difference than taking another LLB. I won't be able to register myself as a Student-at-Law for the joint venture course by LPAB and Uni of Sydney because I am not living in Australia and plans to undertake distance education. I have checked out the accredited Unis and only 2 of them offer distance education - University of New England and Southern Cross University. The fees per subject is AUD$2000++ and multiplying by 12 subjects, that amount can be used to complete my current LLM or for another LLB/degree.

I am not sure if I would want them to review their determination again. What are the chances? And should I really undertake this route? Is it worth? :(
quote
Hi all

I am a LLB law graduate and have just completed the Bar Professional Training Course and have now been classified as a "non-practising barrister"

In the next few years I wish to move to Australia however I am unsure about what I have to, whether I need to complete Pupillage or whether I will be able to gain employment without.

I have so many questions. Are there any courses I need to
take? Could I work in-house? The liklihood of getting a job?

I would be very grateful if anyone couod point me in the right direction?

Kind Regards
Hi all

I am a LLB law graduate and have just completed the Bar Professional Training Course and have now been classified as a "non-practising barrister"

In the next few years I wish to move to Australia however I am unsure about what I have to, whether I need to complete Pupillage or whether I will be able to gain employment without.

I have so many questions. Are there any courses I need to
take? Could I work in-house? The liklihood of getting a job?

I would be very grateful if anyone couod point me in the right direction?

Kind Regards
quote
Hi all

I am a LLB law graduate and have just completed the Bar Professional Training Course and have now been classified as a "non-practising barrister"

In the next few years I wish to move to Australia however I am unsure about what I have to, whether I need to complete Pupillage or whether I will be able to gain employment without.

I have so many questions. Are there any courses I need to
take? Could I work in-house? The liklihood of getting a job?

I would be very grateful if anyone couod point me in the right direction?

Kind Regards


Hi there,

If you are already a qualfiied lawyer from other jurisdictions, you should be able to seek exemptions from both academic qualifications as well as the practical legal training. However, I am unable to advise on the extent of exemptions. You should seek advice from LPAB directly.

I am sure you would most probably be able to work as an in-house but the likelihood of securing a job depends on many factors such as economic.

Would like to ask, what is the difference between a practising and non-practising barrister/solicitor in the UK? Does that mean that you have not applied for your practising certificate?

Thank you.
<blockquote>Hi all

I am a LLB law graduate and have just completed the Bar Professional Training Course and have now been classified as a "non-practising barrister"

In the next few years I wish to move to Australia however I am unsure about what I have to, whether I need to complete Pupillage or whether I will be able to gain employment without.

I have so many questions. Are there any courses I need to
take? Could I work in-house? The liklihood of getting a job?

I would be very grateful if anyone couod point me in the right direction?

Kind Regards
</blockquote>

Hi there,

If you are already a qualfiied lawyer from other jurisdictions, you should be able to seek exemptions from both academic qualifications as well as the practical legal training. However, I am unable to advise on the extent of exemptions. You should seek advice from LPAB directly.

I am sure you would most probably be able to work as an in-house but the likelihood of securing a job depends on many factors such as economic.

Would like to ask, what is the difference between a practising and non-practising barrister/solicitor in the UK? Does that mean that you have not applied for your practising certificate?

Thank you.
quote
I think this is where the UK and Australia differ.

A non-practising barrister becomes a practising barrsiter when they complete pupillage within chambers. Once pupillage has been obtained and sucessfully completed you will then have a practising certificate. I have yet to complete pupillage as they are very difficult to obtain and in any event I may not now obtain a pupillage until 2013-2014, where hopefully I will be by then in Australia. I can at this moment provide legal services however cannnot hold myself out as a barrister.

The LPC is a course that prospective solicitors take. A training contract then has to be obtained and sucessfully completed in order to obtain a practising certificate.
I hope I have clarified this for you.
I have not yet applied or obtained my practising certificate, this is where I am unsure about my next step with regards to moving to another jurisdiction.

I will contact the LPAB, thank you kindly for that advice.

Kind Regards
I think this is where the UK and Australia differ.

A non-practising barrister becomes a practising barrsiter when they complete pupillage within chambers. Once pupillage has been obtained and sucessfully completed you will then have a practising certificate. I have yet to complete pupillage as they are very difficult to obtain and in any event I may not now obtain a pupillage until 2013-2014, where hopefully I will be by then in Australia. I can at this moment provide legal services however cannnot hold myself out as a barrister.

The LPC is a course that prospective solicitors take. A training contract then has to be obtained and sucessfully completed in order to obtain a practising certificate.
I hope I have clarified this for you.
I have not yet applied or obtained my practising certificate, this is where I am unsure about my next step with regards to moving to another jurisdiction.

I will contact the LPAB, thank you kindly for that advice.

Kind Regards
quote
satpal7
Hi there,

I graduated from University Of London (external) with 3rd class Honours in 2009..i havent been practising ever since but i have been working in a law firm in Malaysia to gain experience.
My question is, with my qualifications and work experience, can i sit for the Australian Bar and be a practising lawyer in Victoria?
Hi there,

I graduated from University Of London (external) with 3rd class Honours in 2009..i havent been practising ever since but i have been working in a law firm in Malaysia to gain experience.
My question is, with my qualifications and work experience, can i sit for the Australian Bar and be a practising lawyer in Victoria?
quote
tfuad
Hello Everyone,

I hold a UK law degree and have just completed the Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice at the Australian National University (the 'GDLP').

To be admitted to practice as a lawyer in Australia one must generally fulfill 2 criteria. Firstly, your UK law degree must contain subjects equivalent to those prescribed by law degree programs in Austalia and which comply with the academic requirements of the admitting authority of the state in which you intend to be admitted. Generally, you must have undertaken what Australian lawyers refer to as the 'priestly 11' subjects (you can google this term for more information).

The second criteria for admission to practice concerns practical legal training or PLT. Usually, a candidate for admission will undertake their PLT via a Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice. The GDLP is offered by most Australain law schools and generally a UK law degree is sufficient to gain a place on the course.

Once the academic and PLT requirements are fulfilled then one may apply for admission as a lawyer to a Supreme Court of one of the States (Australia is a Federation).

One caveat however, is that in order to determine whether your UK law degree fulfills the academic requirements of the admitting authority of the State in which you intend to be called, your UK degree must be submitted for assessment by the admitting auhority. After your degree is assessed, the admitting authority will issue you with directions. These directions will stipulate which, if any, additional subjects you must undertake in Australia in order to meet the academic requirements for admission.

In general, these subjects will in include Federal and State Constitutional Law, Evidence, Civil Procedure and Professional Responsibility and Ethics. Also, if you scored less than 50% in any of your core subjects in the UK, be prepared to redo those subjects in Australia. 40% in Australia is not considered a pass.

I hope that this helps.

FT Ahmad.
Hello Everyone,

I hold a UK law degree and have just completed the Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice at the Australian National University (the 'GDLP').

To be admitted to practice as a lawyer in Australia one must generally fulfill 2 criteria. Firstly, your UK law degree must contain subjects equivalent to those prescribed by law degree programs in Austalia and which comply with the academic requirements of the admitting authority of the state in which you intend to be admitted. Generally, you must have undertaken what Australian lawyers refer to as the 'priestly 11' subjects (you can google this term for more information).

The second criteria for admission to practice concerns practical legal training or PLT. Usually, a candidate for admission will undertake their PLT via a Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice. The GDLP is offered by most Australain law schools and generally a UK law degree is sufficient to gain a place on the course.

Once the academic and PLT requirements are fulfilled then one may apply for admission as a lawyer to a Supreme Court of one of the States (Australia is a Federation).

One caveat however, is that in order to determine whether your UK law degree fulfills the academic requirements of the admitting authority of the State in which you intend to be called, your UK degree must be submitted for assessment by the admitting auhority. After your degree is assessed, the admitting authority will issue you with directions. These directions will stipulate which, if any, additional subjects you must undertake in Australia in order to meet the academic requirements for admission.

In general, these subjects will in include Federal and State Constitutional Law, Evidence, Civil Procedure and Professional Responsibility and Ethics. Also, if you scored less than 50% in any of your core subjects in the UK, be prepared to redo those subjects in Australia. 40% in Australia is not considered a pass.

I hope that this helps.

FT Ahmad.
quote
Hi All,

I am a US-qualified lawyer who applied to the Council of Legal Education in Victoria for directions re what I had to do to qualify in Victoria. I received directions from the Council that instructed me to complete 4 subjects -- Property, Constitutional Law, Admin, and Equity.

Now I am researching the cheapest method of completing these 4 subjects. Can anybody offer any advice? Some unis in Melbourne permit you to enroll in individual subjects, which is one option. Does anybody have experience completing subjects online for admission in an Australian jurisdiction? I know you are supposed to be resident in Aus to enrol with the NSW LPAB, but is that rigorously enforced? Any other advice?

Thanks.
Hi All,

I am a US-qualified lawyer who applied to the Council of Legal Education in Victoria for directions re what I had to do to qualify in Victoria. I received directions from the Council that instructed me to complete 4 subjects -- Property, Constitutional Law, Admin, and Equity.

Now I am researching the cheapest method of completing these 4 subjects. Can anybody offer any advice? Some unis in Melbourne permit you to enroll in individual subjects, which is one option. Does anybody have experience completing subjects online for admission in an Australian jurisdiction? I know you are supposed to be resident in Aus to enrol with the NSW LPAB, but is that rigorously enforced? Any other advice?

Thanks.
quote
Gregor2009
I recall that RMIT has an online JD program but this was a couple of years ago. You could see if they are still offering it and enrol online while based where you are (the fees would not be cheaper but you save on accommodation costs and can start now).

Cheers
I recall that RMIT has an online JD program but this was a couple of years ago. You could see if they are still offering it and enrol online while based where you are (the fees would not be cheaper but you save on accommodation costs and can start now).

Cheers
quote

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