Experience of Austrian student at CESL


CESL
by Antonia Menapace ( a international sutdent, CESL)

Sitting here in my apartment in Changping, looking out at the Jundu Mountains in the distance, I try to reflect on my last four months at the China-EU School of Law in Beijing. Have I profited from it in my professional field? Is it what I expected? And more over, what experiences have I had besides simply learning the law?

I clearly remember the moment I chose to come here and study European and International Law. Eight months ago, when I was about to obtain my Magistra iuris from the University of Graz, I had to make the choice that every young university graduate faces: Should I start practicing what I had been learning all these years right away, or should I go on and obtain a post-graduate degree? After a long time and an endless list of pros and cons, the choice suddenly appeared to be not that difficult when I heard about the possibility of studying European and International Law in China.

I had become fascinated by China, during my year abroad at the University of Wuhan. The food, the culture, the pace of life, not to mention the language, are all so different. So the idea of returning for my masters degree sounded tailor-made. And there I was, heading for a city twice the size of my home country Austria.

After arriving in Changping, my European classmates and I had a very busy time ahead. While we were still trying to get settled, find apartments, as well as simply cope with our jetlag, classes started and the first exam was approaching.

The workload at CESL is quite heavy. Since classes and tutorials last all day, the evenings are usually taken up by studying, recapitulating and discussing what we have been taught in the lectures. Due to the fact that most of us specialised in different fields of law before, we benefit from each others knowledge and experience. Also, it is important to say that having such a tight schedule has made us grow together, from being just a group of students to becoming a real circle of friends.

The Chinese students are also very welcoming and are a huge help when it comes to integrating into a new culture. In our spare time we went hiking and played laser tag. One student even helped me to find the apartment where I now sit trying to answer the questions I posed at the beginning. First of all, will studying at CESL help me professionally? I must say yes. Both our European and our Chinese lecturers provide us with profound knowledge in their fields. Also, the curriculum at CESL is chosen to cover a wide range of topics, from contemporary issues of international and European Union law, to specific matters of Chinese Law.

Secondly, have I gained experiences in other fields in ways that a law school in my home country could not provide me? I must surely answer this with a yes as well. Coming to China to study is more than just obtaining a masters degree. In a country so far away from home, with a culture quite different from your own, you face new experiences and impressions every day. In China, even going to the supermarket becomes a mini-adventure. Trying to get to a new place and explain the address to a taxi driver, who neither speaks a language you are familiar with nor writes in a Roman alphabet, becomes a real journey.

Studying in China is certainly an experience that shapes you as a person. Moreover, studying international politics and law with Chinese students and students from different European countries makes you look at the bigger picture, and means you have to be more sensitive towards issues of international law. It also gives you an insight into how difficult it is to form resolutions in the UN General Assembly. These are skills that cannot be taught, but which you acquire by discussing and exchanging ideas with your friends, both inside and outside of the classroom.
by Antonia Menapace ( a international sutdent, CESL)

Sitting here in my apartment in Changping, looking out at the Jundu Mountains in the distance, I try to reflect on my last four months at the China-EU School of Law in Beijing. Have I profited from it in my professional field? Is it what I expected? And more over, what experiences have I had besides simply learning the law?

I clearly remember the moment I chose to come here and study European and International Law. Eight months ago, when I was about to obtain my Magistra iuris from the University of Graz, I had to make the choice that every young university graduate faces: Should I start practicing what I had been learning all these years right away, or should I go on and obtain a post-graduate degree? After a long time and an endless list of pros and cons, the choice suddenly appeared to be not that difficult when I heard about the possibility of studying European and International Law in China.

I had become fascinated by China, during my year abroad at the University of Wuhan. The food, the culture, the pace of life, not to mention the language, are all so different. So the idea of returning for my master’s degree sounded tailor-made. And there I was, heading for a city twice the size of my home country Austria.

After arriving in Changping, my European classmates and I had a very busy time ahead. While we were still trying to get settled, find apartments, as well as simply cope with our jetlag, classes started and the first exam was approaching.

The workload at CESL is quite heavy. Since classes and tutorials last all day, the evenings are usually taken up by studying, recapitulating and discussing what we have been taught in the lectures. Due to the fact that most of us specialised in different fields of law before, we benefit from each others knowledge and experience. Also, it is important to say that having such a tight schedule has made us grow together, from being just a group of students to becoming a real circle of friends.

The Chinese students are also very welcoming and are a huge help when it comes to integrating into a new culture. In our spare time we went hiking and played laser tag. One student even helped me to find the apartment where I now sit trying to answer the questions I posed at the beginning. First of all, will studying at CESL help me professionally? I must say yes. Both our European and our Chinese lecturers provide us with profound knowledge in their fields. Also, the curriculum at CESL is chosen to cover a wide range of topics, from contemporary issues of international and European Union law, to specific matters of Chinese Law.

Secondly, have I gained experiences in other fields in ways that a law school in my home country could not provide me? I must surely answer this with a yes as well. Coming to China to study is more than just obtaining a master’s degree. In a country so far away from home, with a culture quite different from your own, you face new experiences and impressions every day. In China, even going to the supermarket becomes a mini-adventure. Trying to get to a new place and explain the address to a taxi driver, who neither speaks a language you are familiar with nor writes in a Roman alphabet, becomes a real journey.

Studying in China is certainly an experience that shapes you as a person. Moreover, studying international politics and law with Chinese students and students from different European countries makes you look at the bigger picture, and means you have to be more sensitive towards issues of international law. It also gives you an insight into how difficult it is to form resolutions in the UN General Assembly. These are skills that cannot be taught, but which you acquire by discussing and exchanging ideas with your friends, both inside and outside of the classroom.
quote
Antiope
Hello !

did you get a scholarship?

And how did you get it? I don't understand the application process...
Hello !

did you get a scholarship?

And how did you get it? I don't understand the application process...
quote
CESL
Hello Antiope,

I am from the European office of CESL.

You can apply for scholarships after you have been accepted for the programme and when you have in return confirmed the admission. You will then get all the necessary information.

The maximum scholarship is the covering of the tuition fees + a return ticket to Beijing.

Best from Hamburg, Christian
Hello Antiope,

I am from the European office of CESL.

You can apply for scholarships after you have been accepted for the programme and when you have in return confirmed the admission. You will then get all the necessary information.

The maximum scholarship is the covering of the tuition fees + a return ticket to Beijing.

Best from Hamburg, Christian
quote
Antiope
Alright, tank you very much for these informations!
Alright, tank you very much for these informations!
quote
Hello Antiope,

I am from the European office of CESL.

You can apply for scholarships after you have been accepted for the programme and when you have in return confirmed the admission. You will then get all the necessary information.

The maximum scholarship is the covering of the tuition fees + a return ticket to Beijing.

Best from Hamburg, Christian


Hello Christian,

Thank you very much for shedding some insight into the process. Can you please tell me when the information is usually sent out? I received an email that stated my acceptance into the program and stated that scholarships would be announced at the end of May. I sent an email to follow up on the status of the official acceptance letter and the results of scholarship awards, but my email was bounced back to me, repeatedly.

Is it best to call or will they get caught up soon and start replying to people soon?

Thank you so much!
<blockquote>Hello Antiope,

I am from the European office of CESL.

You can apply for scholarships after you have been accepted for the programme and when you have in return confirmed the admission. You will then get all the necessary information.

The maximum scholarship is the covering of the tuition fees + a return ticket to Beijing.

Best from Hamburg, Christian</blockquote>

Hello Christian,

Thank you very much for shedding some insight into the process. Can you please tell me when the information is usually sent out? I received an email that stated my acceptance into the program and stated that scholarships would be announced at the end of May. I sent an email to follow up on the status of the official acceptance letter and the results of scholarship awards, but my email was bounced back to me, repeatedly.

Is it best to call or will they get caught up soon and start replying to people soon?

Thank you so much!
quote

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