Working Before LLM


ilaf
Hi, I am a foreign law school graduate and a permanent resident. I am planning to apply for LLM for 2019-2020 academic year. I will permanently move to the States in September 2018 so I will have 1 year before I start LLM. I want to work during this period, does anyone have any recommendations about what I can work as? (I want to work in the Legal Field)

**I have been working as a trainee lawyer for 1 year in my country. This is an official title given by the State and the Bar. Due to legal requirements, we have to work as an intern after graduation.
Hi, I am a foreign law school graduate and a permanent resident. I am planning to apply for LLM for 2019-2020 academic year. I will permanently move to the States in September 2018 so I will have 1 year before I start LLM. I want to work during this period, does anyone have any recommendations about what I can work as? (I want to work in the Legal Field)

**I have been working as a trainee lawyer for 1 year in my country. This is an official title given by the State and the Bar. Due to legal requirements, we have to work as an intern after graduation.
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Wavshrdr
Is there some area you want to specialize in when you graduate? Maybe find work related to that area. I definitely wouldn't recommend working as a paralegal in the US. Better to keep your resume clean from that if you want to work as a lawyer once you graduate. A student in my LLM class took a job as a paralegal and now that is how many firms view her (as a paralegal rather than a lawyer).
Is there some area you want to specialize in when you graduate? Maybe find work related to that area. I definitely wouldn't recommend working as a paralegal in the US. Better to keep your resume clean from that if you want to work as a lawyer once you graduate. A student in my LLM class took a job as a paralegal and now that is how many firms view her (as a paralegal rather than a lawyer).
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ilaf
Is there some area you want to specialize in when you graduate? Maybe find work related to that area. I definitely wouldn't recommend working as a paralegal in the US. Better to keep your resume clean from that if you want to work as a lawyer once you graduate. A student in my LLM class took a job as a paralegal and now that is how many firms view her (as a paralegal rather than a lawyer).


Thank you very much for your advice. I am currently working in the corporate department of a law office in İstanbul. I mostly work with construction projects, their finance and agreements. I don't really know what I can work as and what my options are really. In my country you can work as an intern during the year aside from working as a summer intern. I am not sure if thats the same in the States.

I want to work because I want to learn how the system works in the States not to earn money so maybe this information would be helpful for other recommendations.
[quote]Is there some area you want to specialize in when you graduate? Maybe find work related to that area. I definitely wouldn't recommend working as a paralegal in the US. Better to keep your resume clean from that if you want to work as a lawyer once you graduate. A student in my LLM class took a job as a paralegal and now that is how many firms view her (as a paralegal rather than a lawyer).[/quote]

Thank you very much for your advice. I am currently working in the corporate department of a law office in İstanbul. I mostly work with construction projects, their finance and agreements. I don't really know what I can work as and what my options are really. In my country you can work as an intern during the year aside from working as a summer intern. I am not sure if thats the same in the States.

I want to work because I want to learn how the system works in the States not to earn money so maybe this information would be helpful for other recommendations.
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Wavshrdr
So I assume (but hate to assume anything) that you can legally work in the US based on your permanent residence status (in the US I assume). If you like construction area, there is a lot of construction going on in some states like Texas and Florida. You might be able to look for jobs where a legal education is a plus in construction jobs. They pay might not be very good BUT you might make some contacts that are useful for when you graduate. I would spend your entire year networking here as much as you can before you start school and continue to do it while in school. Make it almost your full time work.
So I assume (but hate to assume anything) that you can legally work in the US based on your permanent residence status (in the US I assume). If you like construction area, there is a lot of construction going on in some states like Texas and Florida. You might be able to look for jobs where a legal education is a plus in construction jobs. They pay might not be very good BUT you might make some contacts that are useful for when you graduate. I would spend your entire year networking here as much as you can before you start school and continue to do it while in school. Make it almost your full time work.
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chicken so...
Does your Istanbul-based law office have any connections with US law firms? If so maybe you can try to get an internship or another position, like a paralegal job, that doesn't require you to have passed the bar.
Does your Istanbul-based law office have any connections with US law firms? If so maybe you can try to get an internship or another position, like a paralegal job, that doesn't require you to have passed the bar.
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