SCOTUS Clerkship


msachn

are foreign trained lawyers in particular and LL.M. students in general entitled for SCOTUS clerkship?

apparently we are eligible for an internship with the Department of Justice - hurrah.

are foreign trained lawyers in particular and LL.M. students in general entitled for SCOTUS clerkship?

apparently we are eligible for an internship with the Department of Justice - hurrah.
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Nail

That is incorrect. As far as internships with DOJ are concerned, the situation was the opposite until 2 years ago. I looked into it and American citizenship was a prerequisite. Not sure about the former, but would be interested to know. Please keep us posted!
Thanks,
Nail

That is incorrect. As far as internships with DOJ are concerned, the situation was the opposite until 2 years ago. I looked into it and American citizenship was a prerequisite. Not sure about the former, but would be interested to know. Please keep us posted!
Thanks,
Nail
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US Supreme Court clerkships are pretty much the most competitive thing in the US legal system. Clerks tend to be at the top of their JD class in the top 10 law schools, editors on law review, and have done a prior Circuit Court (appellate) clerkship with a "feeder" judge (i.e., a famous appellate judge who the Supreme Court justices know and respect). While being a US citizen may not be a requirement (though I would bet it is), I just can't see anyone being hired for a Supreme Court clerkship who did not have a JD from a US law school, no matter what they have done in their home countries. Sorry!

US Supreme Court clerkships are pretty much the most competitive thing in the US legal system. Clerks tend to be at the top of their JD class in the top 10 law schools, editors on law review, and have done a prior Circuit Court (appellate) clerkship with a "feeder" judge (i.e., a famous appellate judge who the Supreme Court justices know and respect). While being a US citizen may not be a requirement (though I would bet it is), I just can't see anyone being hired for a Supreme Court clerkship who did not have a JD from a US law school, no matter what they have done in their home countries. Sorry!
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Moving away from the US Supreme Court, are there lesser courts for which a foreign lawyer (Australian LLB/High Court) might hope to serve a clerkship with? I am thinking perhaps the lower tier federal courts, or indeed at one of the various State Supreme Courts. And, in addition, how much US specific experience would be expected/required? For instance, do you think an American LLM might be a minimum prerequisite?

Thanks - and, if I can help you out with any Aust questions, do let me know.

Moving away from the US Supreme Court, are there lesser courts for which a foreign lawyer (Australian LLB/High Court) might hope to serve a clerkship with? I am thinking perhaps the lower tier federal courts, or indeed at one of the various State Supreme Courts. And, in addition, how much US specific experience would be expected/required? For instance, do you think an American LLM might be a minimum prerequisite?

Thanks - and, if I can help you out with any Aust questions, do let me know.
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Hey Hockia - did a quick search for you, and it looks like you pretty much have to be a US citizen or permanent resident to get a federal judicial clerkship. (See https://oscar.uscourts.gov/drupal/content/qualifications-salary-and-benefits and the pages linked off of it for more information). That said, the state court systems might not have the same requirement, esp. in some of the less glamorous (but also less nationalist) jurisdictions. If you are really interested, I would look into places like New Jersey or other northeastern states (other than NY and Massachusetts - NY hires career clerks, if I remember correctly, and Massachusetts is pretty competitive because of the large number of law schools there.

Hey Hockia - did a quick search for you, and it looks like you pretty much have to be a US citizen or permanent resident to get a federal judicial clerkship. (See https://oscar.uscourts.gov/drupal/content/qualifications-salary-and-benefits and the pages linked off of it for more information). That said, the state court systems might not have the same requirement, esp. in some of the less glamorous (but also less nationalist) jurisdictions. If you are really interested, I would look into places like New Jersey or other northeastern states (other than NY and Massachusetts - NY hires career clerks, if I remember correctly, and Massachusetts is pretty competitive because of the large number of law schools there.
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