Over qualified policy?


fc

Is there a policy of "too much qualified for us"?

Remembering that the universities (at least top5-top10) offer more spots than they have (knowing approx. how many students will accept or reject the offer).

So, it would not make sense to reject a top student... or not?

Is there a policy of "too much qualified for us"?

Remembering that the universities (at least top5-top10) offer more spots than they have (knowing approx. how many students will accept or reject the offer).

So, it would not make sense to reject a top student... or not?
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Bowen

Is there a policy of "too much qualified for us"?

Remembering that the universities (at least top5-top10) offer more spots than they have (knowing approx. how many students will accept or reject the offer).

So, it would not make sense to reject a top student... or not?


In my humble opinion: such policy does not make any sense. Therefore, I do not think it exists.

<blockquote>Is there a policy of "too much qualified for us"?

Remembering that the universities (at least top5-top10) offer more spots than they have (knowing approx. how many students will accept or reject the offer).

So, it would not make sense to reject a top student... or not?</blockquote>

In my humble opinion: such policy does not make any sense. Therefore, I do not think it exists.
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Gab2009

Hello!

I do think it might makes sense, but I do not really believe in it. Actually I was talking about it with some friends last week.
The misterious ways univs make their decisions are driving us all crazy! lol
What I do believe is that, if you have good grades, letters and essays, you will need two more things(at least): Luck and "Profile". Any school seeks for different people, because of that I think questions like : "If I did not get in UCLA what are my chances of getting in Virginia?" are useless.

kisses and good luck to us all!

Hello!

I do think it might makes sense, but I do not really believe in it. Actually I was talking about it with some friends last week.
The misterious ways univs make their decisions are driving us all crazy! lol
What I do believe is that, if you have good grades, letters and essays, you will need two more things(at least): Luck and "Profile". Any school seeks for different people, because of that I think questions like : "If I did not get in UCLA what are my chances of getting in Virginia?" are useless.

kisses and good luck to us all!
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Doorman

Hello!

I do think it might makes sense, but I do not really believe in it. Actually I was talking about it with some friends last week.
The misterious ways univs make their decisions are driving us all crazy! lol
What I do believe is that, if you have good grades, letters and essays, you will need two more things(at least): Luck and "Perfil". Any school sicks for different people, because of that I think questions like : "If I did not get in UCLA what are my chances of getting in Virginia?" are useless.

kisses and good luck to us all!


I totally agree with you.

However, a top qualified student that matches with what the school is looking for doesnt need any luck at all.

<blockquote>Hello!

I do think it might makes sense, but I do not really believe in it. Actually I was talking about it with some friends last week.
The misterious ways univs make their decisions are driving us all crazy! lol
What I do believe is that, if you have good grades, letters and essays, you will need two more things(at least): Luck and "Perfil". Any school sicks for different people, because of that I think questions like : "If I did not get in UCLA what are my chances of getting in Virginia?" are useless.

kisses and good luck to us all!</blockquote>

I totally agree with you.

However, a top qualified student that matches with what the school is looking for doesnt need any luck at all.

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Destiny09

It's possible because some rejects this year will be overqualified.

It's possible because some rejects this year will be overqualified.
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Gregor2009

i have a bachelors degree, a JD and 3 masters..(I should add that I do not have a LLM from US).

waitlisted by U of Chicago.

go figure.

i have a bachelors degree, a JD and 3 masters..(I should add that I do not have a LLM from US).

waitlisted by U of Chicago.

go figure.

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Destiny09

you show the point cuz they didn't choose you first time around.

you show the point cuz they didn't choose you first time around.
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Gregor is not rejected either during the first time...and with his credentials and a little prayer, he will get in.

All is clear with Him!

Gregor is not rejected either during the first time...and with his credentials and a little prayer, he will get in.

All is clear with Him!
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amicus

Whether or not a candidate is considered as being "overly qualified" is, at the end of the day, a subjective assessment.
One may think that a person with a BA, JD and 3 masters degrees is "overly qualified." Another person may not share the same opinion. If the 3 masters degrees are not really related to the legal profession that the applicant wishes to pursue, then how relevant are they for the LL.M. application? Would this applicant be considered more qualified than a candidate who only has an LL.B., but has 3 years of work experience (in the legal industry that he wishes to pursue) more than him? The universities will wonder why the first applicant is seeking another graduate degree. I think it would be a fair statement to say that most universities consider the genuine intention of applicants who wish to pursue graduate legal studies in their institution. This is the reason why they ask to provide a personal statement and that a good personal statement is essential for the application (and again, whether or not a personal statement is good is also a subjective assessment by the unis.)

In this competitive environment, I don't think that there is such a thing as an "overly qualified policy." All universities (and I'm referring to these "Top 10 unis in the US" that people usually refer to in this board) believe that they are highly regarded institutions with great integrity - they are just too proud and would never believe that a candidate is just too good or "overly qualified" to study at their uni. One universtity may be highly impressed with an applicant with 3 masters degrees. Another university may not share the same opinion. At the end of the day, the applicants are assessed subjectively by various universities that do not necessarily share the same criteria for admission.

Oh, and Christ-Choice - while I do believe that a little bit of luck is needed in life, this whole line of postings with condescending religious remarks is getting a tad old... seriously, it may have been funny at first, but come on... aren't you getting tired of hearing yourself speak this way?

Whether or not a candidate is considered as being "overly qualified" is, at the end of the day, a subjective assessment.
One may think that a person with a BA, JD and 3 masters degrees is "overly qualified." Another person may not share the same opinion. If the 3 masters degrees are not really related to the legal profession that the applicant wishes to pursue, then how relevant are they for the LL.M. application? Would this applicant be considered more qualified than a candidate who only has an LL.B., but has 3 years of work experience (in the legal industry that he wishes to pursue) more than him? The universities will wonder why the first applicant is seeking another graduate degree. I think it would be a fair statement to say that most universities consider the genuine intention of applicants who wish to pursue graduate legal studies in their institution. This is the reason why they ask to provide a personal statement and that a good personal statement is essential for the application (and again, whether or not a personal statement is good is also a subjective assessment by the unis.)

In this competitive environment, I don't think that there is such a thing as an "overly qualified policy." All universities (and I'm referring to these "Top 10 unis in the US" that people usually refer to in this board) believe that they are highly regarded institutions with great integrity - they are just too proud and would never believe that a candidate is just too good or "overly qualified" to study at their uni. One universtity may be highly impressed with an applicant with 3 masters degrees. Another university may not share the same opinion. At the end of the day, the applicants are assessed subjectively by various universities that do not necessarily share the same criteria for admission.

Oh, and Christ-Choice - while I do believe that a little bit of luck is needed in life, this whole line of postings with condescending religious remarks is getting a tad old... seriously, it may have been funny at first, but come on... aren't you getting tired of hearing yourself speak this way?
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I only speak through His grace, so I can't hear myself speak -at least, for now.

Oh Amicus, veteran of the llm guide board, I also saw under the sun this example of wisdom that greatly impressed me: There was once a small city with only a few people in it. And a powerful king came against it, surrounded it and built huge siegeworks against it. Now there lived in that city a man poor but wise, and he saved the city by his wisdom. But nobody remembered that poor man. So I said, Wisdom is better than strength. But the poor mans wisdom is despised, and his words are no longer heeded.

Ecclesiastes 9:13. Amen, Amen, Amen.

I only speak through His grace, so I can't hear myself speak -at least, for now.

Oh Amicus, veteran of the llm guide board, I also saw under the sun this example of wisdom that greatly impressed me: There was once a small city with only a few people in it. And a powerful king came against it, surrounded it and built huge siegeworks against it. Now there lived in that city a man poor but wise, and he saved the city by his wisdom. But nobody remembered that poor man. So I said, “Wisdom is better than strength.” But the poor man’s wisdom is despised, and his words are no longer heeded.

Ecclesiastes 9:13. Amen, Amen, Amen.

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fc

I really don't know if this policy exists. What I do know is that some law schools make quite curious (at least) choices. Let`s take Gregor's example (and honestly post grades/Master not linked to law are very important too, as nowadays areas like finance, banking, accounting, etc., are extremely important. Law itself doesnt survive isolated).
Continuing... some accepted students have 23 years old, no work experience, and no other great achievements. Honestly, I think they give too much weight for which university one took the JD, compared with other factors (post grades, work experience, publications, scholarships, awards, etc.). In some countries you go to JD (and choose de univ.) with 17... come on...
BUT... they can only have a different profile. So, a univ. can be looking for young fresh graduate students. And even if there is an excellent candidate but already with a substantial work experience, this guy would not fit in their profile. Who guess...

I really don't know if this policy exists. What I do know is that some law schools make quite curious (at least) choices. Let`s take Gregor's example (and honestly post grades/Master not linked to law are very important too, as nowadays areas like finance, banking, accounting, etc., are extremely important. Law itself doesn’t survive isolated).
Continuing... some accepted students have 23 years old, no work experience, and no other great achievements. Honestly, I think they give too much weight for which university one took the JD, compared with other factors (post grades, work experience, publications, scholarships, awards, etc.). In some countries you go to JD (and choose de univ.) with 17... come on...
BUT... they can only have a different profile. So, a univ. can be looking for young fresh graduate students. And even if there is an excellent candidate but already with a substantial work experience, this guy would not fit in their profile. Who guess...
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Gab2009

Fc, really agree with your statement. sometimes it seems do not make any sense but I believe the reason is that law schools have quotas for different kind of people. It is true that sometimes they accept 23 years old people with no work experience (my case), but they also accept people with many years of expereience, and to be sicere, I think the 23 years old actually are the exception! The majority of the classes are formed by people that have, at least, 3 or 4 years of working experience...

So, I agree that their selection procedure is curious, and we do not understand it very well, but because we do not know all the criterias and the weigh they put in any criteria, like quotas, diversity, minoraties, grades, personal statemnt, profile and off course, some luck!

Kisses and hope we met in some of these great schools we are applying for!
Boa sorte pra nos!

Fc, really agree with your statement. sometimes it seems do not make any sense but I believe the reason is that law schools have quotas for different kind of people. It is true that sometimes they accept 23 years old people with no work experience (my case), but they also accept people with many years of expereience, and to be sicere, I think the 23 years old actually are the exception! The majority of the classes are formed by people that have, at least, 3 or 4 years of working experience...

So, I agree that their selection procedure is curious, and we do not understand it very well, but because we do not know all the criterias and the weigh they put in any criteria, like quotas, diversity, minoraties, grades, personal statemnt, profile and off course, some luck!

Kisses and hope we met in some of these great schools we are applying for!
Boa sorte pra nos!
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Jay P

Hello Friends,
To all the distinguished and respected members of this discussion board I would like to present my question.Perhaps the questions I want to ask may not be in context with the title,however I will take my chance.
My basic education and work experience have been such:
Completed my bachelor's degree in Computer Science and Engineering from India. I worked in companies like Dell and HP. Although my experience wasnt at the top tier I worked as a team leader in IT Support operations.Since my 5 years of employment currently I am pursuing my Masters in Law LLM in International Information Technology Law from Robert Gordon University Scotland.My initial reason to pick up the LLM program was with the belief that I can be a qualified lawyer without having an under graduate degree in Law. Now I think I have hit few tough ends along the way. So my questions to you all is
To be a qualified corporate IT lawyer what are the steps that come along the way.(Inclusive of different jurisdictions Australia,United States,Germany,Belgium)?
Is it possible at all to be a solicitor or corporate Lawyer with the inheritance I have?
Also I have a imposing constraint of age as well i.e I am 28.
Thanks again in anticipation

Hello Friends,
To all the distinguished and respected members of this discussion board I would like to present my question.Perhaps the questions I want to ask may not be in context with the title,however I will take my chance.
My basic education and work experience have been such:
Completed my bachelor's degree in Computer Science and Engineering from India. I worked in companies like Dell and HP. Although my experience wasnt at the top tier I worked as a team leader in IT Support operations.Since my 5 years of employment currently I am pursuing my Masters in Law LLM in International Information Technology Law from Robert Gordon University Scotland.My initial reason to pick up the LLM program was with the belief that I can be a qualified lawyer without having an under graduate degree in Law. Now I think I have hit few tough ends along the way. So my questions to you all is
To be a qualified corporate IT lawyer what are the steps that come along the way.(Inclusive of different jurisdictions Australia,United States,Germany,Belgium)?
Is it possible at all to be a solicitor or corporate Lawyer with the inheritance I have?
Also I have a imposing constraint of age as well i.e I am 28.
Thanks again in anticipation
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michaelcor...

in addition to your LLM, you should do a JD in the US to do the bar exam. Northwestern has two year JD programs, try that.

in addition to your LLM, you should do a JD in the US to do the bar exam. Northwestern has two year JD programs, try that.
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Jay P

Hi Michael,
Thanks for your post.Im grateful for your reply.Will passing the Bar exam be the only necessity to be a lawyer or I need to undergo some conversion programs or diploma courses in addition.Just an inference from the existing structure in
Scotland: The person who wants to be a lawyer need to have completed LLB
England: Non law students need to take up one year conversion program,then a LPC for one year and finally a term of 2 years of Training Contract to be a solicitor.
Also are all the JD programs with a duration of 2 years.Your input on this will be highly appreciated

Hi Michael,
Thanks for your post.Im grateful for your reply.Will passing the Bar exam be the only necessity to be a lawyer or I need to undergo some conversion programs or diploma courses in addition.Just an inference from the existing structure in
Scotland: The person who wants to be a lawyer need to have completed LLB
England: Non law students need to take up one year conversion program,then a LPC for one year and finally a term of 2 years of Training Contract to be a solicitor.
Also are all the JD programs with a duration of 2 years.Your input on this will be highly appreciated

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