NYU vs CLS


Hi guys,
I've received admission notifications from both NYU and CLS. Hooray!
But my question is: what the hell am I gonna do now?
My interests are mainly focused on Human Rights and International Law, but also very much on economics and foreign affairs (counter-terrorism, security issues, globalisation), always in a HR oriented perspective.
It seems to me NYU is way better on this field: focused seminars and colloquia, the center on law and securities, IILJ, CHRGJ.
But, at the same time, how can you say "no" to Columbia, member of the Ivy League?
Txs a lot for your help!

Hi guys,
I've received admission notifications from both NYU and CLS. Hooray!
But my question is: what the hell am I gonna do now?
My interests are mainly focused on Human Rights and International Law, but also very much on economics and foreign affairs (counter-terrorism, security issues, globalisation), always in a HR oriented perspective.
It seems to me NYU is way better on this field: focused seminars and colloquia, the center on law and securities, IILJ, CHRGJ.
But, at the same time, how can you say "no" to Columbia, member of the Ivy League?
Txs a lot for your help!
quote
LLMblogger

I think you should choose Columbia. I have heard that as a CLS student you can take classes at NYU. Has anyone heard about this (as I am not sure where I got this information)?

I think you should choose Columbia. I have heard that as a CLS student you can take classes at NYU. Has anyone heard about this (as I am not sure where I got this information)?
quote

Txs a lot LLM blogger!
I had never heard about this though.
Anyone else with useful tips/advice/info?

Txs a lot LLM blogger!
I had never heard about this though.
Anyone else with useful tips/advice/info?
quote
MAB79

I think you already have stated your answer if you feel that NYU covers your fields of interests better. I do not think that you should take an offer of CLS just because it is a member of the Ivy League. NYU ranks close behindern it and last but not least it is your money.

And you can def not take classes at NYU.

I think you already have stated your answer if you feel that NYU covers your fields of interests better. I do not think that you should take an offer of CLS just because it is a member of the Ivy League. NYU ranks close behindern it and last but not least it is your money.

And you can def not take classes at NYU.
quote
CanuckLLM

I think you already have stated your answer if you feel that NYU covers your fields of interests better. I do not think that you should take an offer of CLS just because it is a member of the Ivy League. NYU ranks close behindern it and last but not least it is your money.

And you can def not take classes at NYU.


I was told by a current CLS student that you can take courses at NYU.

OP: my interests are very similar to yours, and I had exactly the same feeling (that NYU could be a better "match" for such interests, but CLS could be a better "name"). That being said, CLS offers the ability for you to take courses at SIPA, which would give you the chance to take an int'l affairs course.

<blockquote>I think you already have stated your answer if you feel that NYU covers your fields of interests better. I do not think that you should take an offer of CLS just because it is a member of the Ivy League. NYU ranks close behindern it and last but not least it is your money.

And you can def not take classes at NYU. </blockquote>

I was told by a current CLS student that you can take courses at NYU.

OP: my interests are very similar to yours, and I had exactly the same feeling (that NYU could be a better "match" for such interests, but CLS could be a better "name"). That being said, CLS offers the ability for you to take courses at SIPA, which would give you the chance to take an int'l affairs course.
quote
kaylianna@...

About corss-registration classes between NYU and Columbia:
http://www.law.nyu.edu/recordsandregistration/crossregistration/columbialawschoolnyuschooloflawexchange/index.htm

I guess the most important part to be stressed here is:
"In 2009-2010, Columbia Law and NYU School of Law will allow a limited number of students to take courses at each other's schools. Approximately thirty students from each school will be eligible for this opportunity this academic year. Students are permitted to take one course at the other school during their academic career."

About corss-registration classes between NYU and Columbia:
http://www.law.nyu.edu/recordsandregistration/crossregistration/columbialawschoolnyuschooloflawexchange/index.htm

I guess the most important part to be stressed here is:
"In 2009-2010, Columbia Law and NYU School of Law will allow a limited number of students to take courses at each other's schools. Approximately thirty students from each school will be eligible for this opportunity this academic year. Students are permitted to take one course at the other school during their academic career."
quote



OP: my interests are very similar to yours, and I had exactly the same feeling (that NYU could be a better "match" for such interests, but CLS could be a better "name"). That being said, CLS offers the ability for you to take courses at SIPA, which would give you the chance to take an int'l affairs courses.


You got it right, CanuckLLM. And the opportunity of taking classes at SIPA too is very tempting, as I was originally undecided between SIPA with focus on human rights, conflict resolutions and LLM. And afterall, Columbia still looks more selective.
But whenever I have a look at NYU Law School centers webpages I feel lost again!

<blockquote><blockquote>

OP: my interests are very similar to yours, and I had exactly the same feeling (that NYU could be a better "match" for such interests, but CLS could be a better "name"). That being said, CLS offers the ability for you to take courses at SIPA, which would give you the chance to take an int'l affairs courses.</blockquote>

You got it right, CanuckLLM. And the opportunity of taking classes at SIPA too is very tempting, as I was originally undecided between SIPA with focus on human rights, conflict resolutions and LLM. And afterall, Columbia still looks more selective.
But whenever I have a look at NYU Law School centers webpages I feel lost again!
quote
CanuckLLM



OP: my interests are very similar to yours, and I had exactly the same feeling (that NYU could be a better "match" for such interests, but CLS could be a better "name"). That being said, CLS offers the ability for you to take courses at SIPA, which would give you the chance to take an int'l affairs courses.


You got it right, CanuckLLM. And the opportunity of taking classes at SIPA too is very tempting, as I was originally undecided between SIPA with focus on human rights, conflict resolutions and LLM. And afterall, Columbia still looks more selective.
But whenever I have a look at NYU Law School centers webpages I feel lost again!


As a previous poster mentioned, your gut reaction might be an indication that your decision should be NYU.

What are your plans post-LL.M.? Maybe you could ask your references for advice on whether attending CLS over NYU could be a factor in you being successful in your future plans.

If it's any help, I'm from Canada, and the dean of my law school mentioned that NYU has a great reputation. As such, if your plans involve academia, the difference between a degree from NYU or CLS might be negligible.

<blockquote><blockquote>

OP: my interests are very similar to yours, and I had exactly the same feeling (that NYU could be a better "match" for such interests, but CLS could be a better "name"). That being said, CLS offers the ability for you to take courses at SIPA, which would give you the chance to take an int'l affairs courses.</blockquote>

You got it right, CanuckLLM. And the opportunity of taking classes at SIPA too is very tempting, as I was originally undecided between SIPA with focus on human rights, conflict resolutions and LLM. And afterall, Columbia still looks more selective.
But whenever I have a look at NYU Law School centers webpages I feel lost again!</blockquote>

As a previous poster mentioned, your gut reaction might be an indication that your decision should be NYU.

What are your plans post-LL.M.? Maybe you could ask your references for advice on whether attending CLS over NYU could be a factor in you being successful in your future plans.

If it's any help, I'm from Canada, and the dean of my law school mentioned that NYU has a great reputation. As such, if your plans involve academia, the difference between a degree from NYU or CLS might be negligible.
quote
dierome

Hi,
I´ve been admitted to NYU, to the Trade Regulation Program...I´ve heard wonderful things about this program, indeed...
However, I´ve heard that the admissions criteria for the LLM program is not as selective is it should be for a T-5 university and that, as a result, the LLM classes resemble a supermarket more than anything else (200 students in a single class)
Is there anyone that can shed some light in this matter?
If true, I don´t think it is attractive at all to enter classes with +100 students...

Hi,
I´ve been admitted to NYU, to the Trade Regulation Program...I´ve heard wonderful things about this program, indeed...
However, I´ve heard that the admissions criteria for the LLM program is not as selective is it should be for a T-5 university and that, as a result, the LLM classes resemble a supermarket more than anything else (200 students in a single class)
Is there anyone that can shed some light in this matter?
If true, I don´t think it is attractive at all to enter classes with +100 students...
quote

Hi,
I´ve been admitted to NYU, to the Trade Regulation Program...I´ve heard wonderful things about this program and the fact that NYU is in the village is just too good not to overlook....
However, I´ve heard that the admissions criteria for the LLM program is not as selective is it should be for a T-5 university and that, as a result, the LLM classes resemble a supermarket more than anything else (200 students in a single class)
Is there anyone that can shed some light in this matter?
If true, I don´t think it is attractive at all to enter classes with +100 students...


Indeed this would be good to know...

<blockquote>Hi,
I´ve been admitted to NYU, to the Trade Regulation Program...I´ve heard wonderful things about this program and the fact that NYU is in the village is just too good not to overlook....
However, I´ve heard that the admissions criteria for the LLM program is not as selective is it should be for a T-5 university and that, as a result, the LLM classes resemble a supermarket more than anything else (200 students in a single class)
Is there anyone that can shed some light in this matter?
If true, I don´t think it is attractive at all to enter classes with +100 students...</blockquote>

Indeed this would be good to know...
quote
ILAW

As to international law:

1. NYU is not considered the best as Columbia stands 1st according to the latest US News ranking:
grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-gr

2. Columbia allows its LLM students to intern at the United Nations Headquarters during the respective academic year and earn credits for that. NYU does NOT offer such an excellent opportunity.

3. In the area of International Criminal Law, which has gained tremendous momentum due to the establishment of the International Criminal Court, Columbia offers up to four courses-seminars. NYU does not even offer an introductory course. Also, considering the enormous importance of the above-mentioned area for other branches of international law such as international human rights law and international humanitarian law, NYU does not qualify as the best option in international-human rights law.

4. Needless to say that Columbia not only as a law school but also as a university ranks better than NYU. As to the latter, the difference is especially overwhelming: 11th vs 52nd according to the THE-World Ranking of Universities. In the case of the Academic ranking of world universities: 7 th for Columbia vs. 32 for NYU. If selectivity when admitting students to one or another LLM program is a criterion to be considered, those results are not a surprise at all. In addition, the LLM applicants-admitted ratio is: 8-1 (Columbia) vs 4-1 (NYU).

As to international law:

1. NYU is not considered the best as Columbia stands 1st according to the latest US News ranking:
grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-gr…

2. Columbia allows its LLM students to intern at the United Nations Headquarters during the respective academic year and earn credits for that. NYU does NOT offer such an excellent opportunity.

3. In the area of International Criminal Law, which has gained tremendous momentum due to the establishment of the International Criminal Court, Columbia offers up to four courses-seminars. NYU does not even offer an introductory course. Also, considering the enormous importance of the above-mentioned area for other branches of international law such as international human rights law and international humanitarian law, NYU does not qualify as the best option in international-human rights law.

4. Needless to say that Columbia not only as a law school but also as a university ranks better than NYU. As to the latter, the difference is especially overwhelming: 11th vs 52nd according to the THE-World Ranking of Universities. In the case of the Academic ranking of world universities: 7 th for Columbia vs. 32 for NYU. If selectivity when admitting students to one or another LLM program is a criterion to be considered, those results are not a surprise at all. In addition, the LLM applicants-admitted ratio is: 8-1 (Columbia) vs 4-1 (NYU).

quote

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