NYU Personal statement. Is the 500 word limit mandatory?


Hi,

Has any one gone over the 500 words requirement for NYU personal statement? The Schools website does ask LLM applicants to describe his/her backgrounds, extra curriculum, academic interests, why LLM and the future plan. I found it virtually impossible to do this and still make the statement very vivid. Will it harm my application if I go went by just 50 words?

Cheers,

Julius Caesar
Hi,

Has any one gone over the 500 words requirement for NYU personal statement? The Schools website does ask LLM applicants to describe his/her backgrounds, extra curriculum, academic interests, why LLM and the future plan. I found it virtually impossible to do this and still make the statement very vivid. Will it harm my application if I go went by just 50 words?

Cheers,

Julius Caesar
quote
I stuck to the word limit. I'm not really sure if its mandatory, but surely better safe than sorry?
I stuck to the word limit. I'm not really sure if its mandatory, but surely better safe than sorry?
quote
As quoted from almost every dean of American law schools - tip No.x, to strictly respect the word count limit of each school.
As quoted from almost every dean of American law schools - tip No.x, to strictly respect the word count limit of each school.
quote
Hi,

Has any one gone over the 500 words requirement for NYU personal statement? The Schools website does ask LLM applicants to describe his/her backgrounds, extra curriculum, academic interests, why LLM and the future plan. I found it virtually impossible to do this and still make the statement very vivid. Will it harm my application if I go went by just 50 words?

Cheers,

Julius Caesar


Further, there are two more things I can't hold to say - first, I think you, like me, have had a good nick name as well as a good profile pic; second, I guess Roman empire and maybe Edward Gibon also grab you as they've grabbed me.
<blockquote>Hi,

Has any one gone over the 500 words requirement for NYU personal statement? The Schools website does ask LLM applicants to describe his/her backgrounds, extra curriculum, academic interests, why LLM and the future plan. I found it virtually impossible to do this and still make the statement very vivid. Will it harm my application if I go went by just 50 words?

Cheers,

Julius Caesar</blockquote>

Further, there are two more things I can't hold to say - first, I think you, like me, have had a good nick name as well as a good profile pic; second, I guess Roman empire and maybe Edward Gibon also grab you as they've grabbed me.
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mdm31
I heard it from mr. Timothy - nyu director of admissions - himself: respect the word limit. They consider it a quality of a good lawyer to be able to summarize and edit. Unless you are brilliant in many other aspects, I guess that this would be a deal breaker.
I heard it from mr. Timothy - nyu director of admissions - himself: respect the word limit. They consider it a quality of a good lawyer to be able to summarize and edit. Unless you are brilliant in many other aspects, I guess that this would be a deal breaker.
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newlygrad
To add one more thing, I believe that respecting to the word limit is being fair to the other applicants that respect to the rule. Like other applicants, I had a lot of things to tell the admissions committee that would exceed even 2000 words, but I didn't add a word to my 500 words essay. If this is the requirement, we have to respect it.
To add one more thing, I believe that respecting to the word limit is being fair to the other applicants that respect to the rule. Like other applicants, I had a lot of things to tell the admissions committee that would exceed even 2000 words, but I didn't add a word to my 500 words essay. If this is the requirement, we have to respect it.
quote
Thanks folks. My word count was exactly 500. I think the opportunity to submit addenda (I attached a statement of diversity and statement of strong interest in NYU) make up for the personal statement word limit.

I have another question. Are the applicants who hand in an essay for Hauser scholarship more likely to get any sort of tuition waiver (if admitted) than applicants who don't. I was very optimistic about my essay being selected as the winner of the Hauser scholarship till I checked the Law School's website and saw the profile of past Hauser scholars.
Thanks folks. My word count was exactly 500. I think the opportunity to submit addenda (I attached a statement of diversity and statement of strong interest in NYU) make up for the personal statement word limit.

I have another question. Are the applicants who hand in an essay for Hauser scholarship more likely to get any sort of tuition waiver (if admitted) than applicants who don't. I was very optimistic about my essay being selected as the winner of the Hauser scholarship till I checked the Law School's website and saw the profile of past Hauser scholars.
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mdm31
I dont understand. What are these statements ou provided? Where are they foreseen in the application rules?
I dont understand. What are these statements ou provided? Where are they foreseen in the application rules?
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On LSAC, applicants can attach 4 addenda and a scholarship essay to there application. These are all optional of course
On LSAC, applicants can attach 4 addenda and a scholarship essay to there application. These are all optional of course
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GodBless
These optional statements.. aren't they meant for explanations if u answered 'yes' for a particular section? (one regarding convictions, disbarment, expulsion etc)
I did not realize u could submit an additional statement to show case your interest in NYU! I didn't think that was allowed. Not saying u r wrong. I might be wrong. But can u please elaborate on this?
These optional statements.. aren't they meant for explanations if u answered 'yes' for a particular section? (one regarding convictions, disbarment, expulsion etc)
I did not realize u could submit an additional statement to show case your interest in NYU! I didn't think that was allowed. Not saying u r wrong. I might be wrong. But can u please elaborate on this?
quote
NebNeb
These optional statements.. aren't they meant for explanations if u answered 'yes' for a particular section? (one regarding convictions, disbarment, expulsion etc)
I did not realize u could submit an additional statement to show case your interest in NYU! I didn't think that was allowed. Not saying u r wrong. I might be wrong. But can u please elaborate on this?


That's what I thought too... But I guess there are always means to get around the word limit...

I must say that I doubt the admission committee will give any consideration to these additional "interests statements" since, as said by newlygrad, it would place other applicants who actually did respect the rule in an unfair position.
<blockquote>These optional statements.. aren't they meant for explanations if u answered 'yes' for a particular section? (one regarding convictions, disbarment, expulsion etc)
I did not realize u could submit an additional statement to show case your interest in NYU! I didn't think that was allowed. Not saying u r wrong. I might be wrong. But can u please elaborate on this? </blockquote>

That's what I thought too... But I guess there are always means to get around the word limit...

I must say that I doubt the admission committee will give any consideration to these additional "interests statements" since, as said by newlygrad, it would place other applicants who actually did respect the rule in an unfair position.
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GodBless
Actually, now to think about it, I don't think these addenda are meant for submitting additional 'statements of interest' or 'Personal statements'. If that were the case, then, there would be no point in fixing a 500 word limit for your PS. The point is to be able to showcase your interest (professionally/ academically as well as personally) in these 500 words. if writing further about your interests in these optional statement were accepted then they might as well have increased their PS word limit, don't you think?
Again, I might be wrong. But it seems this way to me.
U should check with the school once before submitting (in case u haven't submitted already). Better to be safe.
Actually, now to think about it, I don't think these addenda are meant for submitting additional 'statements of interest' or 'Personal statements'. If that were the case, then, there would be no point in fixing a 500 word limit for your PS. The point is to be able to showcase your interest (professionally/ academically as well as personally) in these 500 words. if writing further about your interests in these optional statement were accepted then they might as well have increased their PS word limit, don't you think?
Again, I might be wrong. But it seems this way to me.
U should check with the school once before submitting (in case u haven't submitted already). Better to be safe.
quote
Like I said, it's optional. If your personal statement is good enough, you will get in. You need not worry if you didn't submit any additional statement. An additional statement of diversity, if it makes you unique, is always encouraged by the admission board. This will surely not be detrimental to your application. If you look at Law Schools website, you will see a description of what a personal statement should consist of (a brief summary of your academic interest, why LLM and future goals). Law schools, especially NYU, want to create a community of scholars from different spheres of life. If there is something that sets an applicant apart from the rest, then it is imperative to state it.
Like I said, it's optional. If your personal statement is good enough, you will get in. You need not worry if you didn't submit any additional statement. An additional statement of diversity, if it makes you unique, is always encouraged by the admission board. This will surely not be detrimental to your application. If you look at Law Schools website, you will see a description of what a personal statement should consist of (a brief summary of your academic interest, why LLM and future goals). Law schools, especially NYU, want to create a community of scholars from different spheres of life. If there is something that sets an applicant apart from the rest, then it is imperative to state it.
quote
These optional statements.. aren't they meant for explanations if u answered 'yes' for a particular section? (one regarding convictions, disbarment, expulsion etc)
I did not realize u could submit an additional statement to show case your interest in NYU! I didn't think that was allowed. Not saying u r wrong. I might be wrong. But can u please elaborate on this?


That's what I thought too... But I guess there are always means to get around the word limit...

I must say that I doubt the admission committee will give any consideration to these additional "interests statements" since, as said by newlygrad, it would place other applicants who actually did respect the rule in an unfair position.
<blockquote><blockquote>These optional statements.. aren't they meant for explanations if u answered 'yes' for a particular section? (one regarding convictions, disbarment, expulsion etc)
I did not realize u could submit an additional statement to show case your interest in NYU! I didn't think that was allowed. Not saying u r wrong. I might be wrong. But can u please elaborate on this? </blockquote>

That's what I thought too... But I guess there are always means to get around the word limit...

I must say that I doubt the admission committee will give any consideration to these additional "interests statements" since, as said by newlygrad, it would place other applicants who actually did respect the rule in an unfair position.
quote
There is no rule saying you can not submit an addendum of Diversity. You can certainly worry about an applicant going over the 500 personal statement word limit but need not worry about an applicant letting the admission committee know about an important thing that sets him apart from the rest. But then again, you should only worry about your application.
There is no rule saying you can not submit an addendum of Diversity. You can certainly worry about an applicant going over the 500 personal statement word limit but need not worry about an applicant letting the admission committee know about an important thing that sets him apart from the rest. But then again, you should only worry about your application.
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NebNeb
I guess I was stupid enough to actually include the factors that set me apart from the rest (as in make me awesome ;)) in the personal statement within the 500 word limit. I was so dumb that I actually did obey the rules and did not even try to bend them... oh, go figure
I guess I was stupid enough to actually include the factors that set me apart from the rest (as in make me awesome ;)) in the personal statement within the 500 word limit. I was so dumb that I actually did obey the rules and did not even try to bend them... oh, go figure
quote
newlygrad
I guess I was stupid enough to actually include the factors that set me apart from the rest (as in make me awesome ;)) in the personal statement within the 500 word limit. I was so dumb that I actually did obey the rules and did not even try to bend them... oh, go figure


I think disobeying rules is the stupidity. I also respected the rules and I don't regret it. Don't worry, if we are qualified enough, we should be able to get in. Obeying the rules is an important credential of a legal scholar, I think we should be proud of it : ) The ones who tried to find a way to depart from the rule will be disadvantaged anyway. This is what I believe.
<blockquote>I guess I was stupid enough to actually include the factors that set me apart from the rest (as in make me awesome ;)) in the personal statement within the 500 word limit. I was so dumb that I actually did obey the rules and did not even try to bend them... oh, go figure</blockquote>

I think disobeying rules is the stupidity. I also respected the rules and I don't regret it. Don't worry, if we are qualified enough, we should be able to get in. Obeying the rules is an important credential of a legal scholar, I think we should be proud of it : ) The ones who tried to find a way to depart from the rule will be disadvantaged anyway. This is what I believe.
quote
To think that adding an addendum to an application is a breach of a 500 word limit personal statement is not only stupid but also naive. When you become a lawyer, always stick to the 'rules'.


Good luck
To think that adding an addendum to an application is a breach of a 500 word limit personal statement is not only stupid but also naive. When you become a lawyer, always stick to the 'rules'.


Good luck
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newlygrad
To think that adding an addendum to an application is a breach of a 500 word limit personal statement is not only stupid but also naive. When you become a lawyer, always stick to the 'rules'.


Good luck


From what I read, I understand that you think law is flexible. However, I do not agree with this opinion when it comes to explicit rules. NYU explicitly states the word limit and required essays on its web page. Admissions committee would immediately notice these kind of so called "wise" attempts. Good luck to you.
<blockquote>To think that adding an addendum to an application is a breach of a 500 word limit personal statement is not only stupid but also naive. When you become a lawyer, always stick to the 'rules'.


Good luck </blockquote>

From what I read, I understand that you think law is flexible. However, I do not agree with this opinion when it comes to explicit rules. NYU explicitly states the word limit and required essays on its web page. Admissions committee would immediately notice these kind of so called "wise" attempts. Good luck to you.
quote
mdm31
Like I said, it's optional. If your personal statement is good enough, you will get in. You need not worry if you didn't submit any additional statement. An additional statement of diversity, if it makes you unique, is always encouraged by the admission board. This will surely not be detrimental to your application. If you look at Law Schools website, you will see a description of what a personal statement should consist of (a brief summary of your academic interest, why LLM and future goals). Law schools, especially NYU, want to create a community of scholars from different spheres of life. If there is something that sets an applicant apart from the rest, then it is imperative to state it.


Of course it is, and we all know that. We also read the rules over and over again - something i think you missed. We all put our strong points, academic interests, goals, etc, WITHIN THE WORD LIMIT. Where did tou read this additional "diversity statemet" is encouraged by the board of admissions? Do you really think thats fair? Or that you have that much more to say than the rest of us? You cant be serious...
<blockquote>Like I said, it's optional. If your personal statement is good enough, you will get in. You need not worry if you didn't submit any additional statement. An additional statement of diversity, if it makes you unique, is always encouraged by the admission board. This will surely not be detrimental to your application. If you look at Law Schools website, you will see a description of what a personal statement should consist of (a brief summary of your academic interest, why LLM and future goals). Law schools, especially NYU, want to create a community of scholars from different spheres of life. If there is something that sets an applicant apart from the rest, then it is imperative to state it.
</blockquote>

Of course it is, and we all know that. We also read the rules over and over again - something i think you missed. We all put our strong points, academic interests, goals, etc, WITHIN THE WORD LIMIT. Where did tou read this additional "diversity statemet" is encouraged by the board of admissions? Do you really think thats fair? Or that you have that much more to say than the rest of us? You cant be serious...
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