LLMs can transfer to a JD without LSAT


sak1969
I heard that LLM students at some schools, like the University of Hawaii can transfer to the JD program at Hawaii without taking the LSAT examination. Some of the LLM credits even transfer, so they can earn two degrees in 3 and a half years.
I heard that LLM students at some schools, like the University of Hawaii can transfer to the JD program at Hawaii without taking the LSAT examination. Some of the LLM credits even transfer, so they can earn two degrees in 3 and a half years.
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Santa
At UVA you can transfer too, but only if you have good grades.
At UVA you can transfer too, but only if you have good grades.
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Check out Miami in this regard - can't say today what it does but it used to allow this.
Check out Miami in this regard - can't say today what it does but it used to allow this.
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Pratima
@Sak1969 - University of Southern California, Law allows this kind of transfer. Check out the website : http://lawweb.usc.edu/how/gip/llm/admissions.cfm

I think the UCs also offer this transfer, but I can't give any specific examples.
@Sak1969 - University of Southern California, Law allows this kind of transfer. Check out the website : http://lawweb.usc.edu/how/gip/llm/admissions.cfm

I think the UCs also offer this transfer, but I can't give any specific examples.
quote
Curious if anyone else knows of others?

Thinking of compiling the information together for January's AALS meeting of the Section of Graduate Programs for Non-US Lawyers.
Curious if anyone else knows of others?

Thinking of compiling the information together for January's AALS meeting of the Section of Graduate Programs for Non-US Lawyers.

quote
Washington University in St. Louis
If you have an average score of 84 or higher,
you can transfer to JD
and finish your studies in a total of 3 ~ 3.5 years.
Washington University in St. Louis
If you have an average score of 84 or higher,
you can transfer to JD
and finish your studies in a total of 3 ~ 3.5 years.
quote
Following up on shortened study for a JD/other - in the USA there have always been 3+3 programs meaning three years of university and then three years of law school, reducing the study by one year.

There is currently a push for 2+3 and even 2+2, in particular by the Department of Education (reducing debt) and by employers (reducing salaries). A few schools will pilot the 2+3 (two years of university, following the medical school early admit model) within 2 years. This wil reduce student debt by two years.

A few schools already offer 2 year JDs - this will become more common. While 88 credits are still required by ABA standards, the third year of credit are compressed into the 2 summer semesters plus credit for externships in outside jobs.

Moreover, an LLM can be offered as part of the 88 credits. So soon to be a reality, a student could after two years of focused university study, tack on two years of law school to obtain the JD and LLM, and receive a Bachelors upon completion of the JD. I recall reading a few days ago that a 2 year university model was just adopted by the New Hampshire Legislature to reduce student debt (and state educational expenditure) - allowing their students to go to law school immediately following on early admission.

Prof. William Byrnes - http://williambyrnes.wordpress.com
Following up on shortened study for a JD/other - in the USA there have always been 3+3 programs meaning three years of university and then three years of law school, reducing the study by one year.

There is currently a push for 2+3 and even 2+2, in particular by the Department of Education (reducing debt) and by employers (reducing salaries). A few schools will pilot the 2+3 (two years of university, following the medical school early admit model) within 2 years. This wil reduce student debt by two years.

A few schools already offer 2 year JDs - this will become more common. While 88 credits are still required by ABA standards, the third year of credit are compressed into the 2 summer semesters plus credit for externships in outside jobs.

Moreover, an LLM can be offered as part of the 88 credits. So soon to be a reality, a student could after two years of focused university study, tack on two years of law school to obtain the JD and LLM, and receive a Bachelors upon completion of the JD. I recall reading a few days ago that a 2 year university model was just adopted by the New Hampshire Legislature to reduce student debt (and state educational expenditure) - allowing their students to go to law school immediately following on early admission.

Prof. William Byrnes - http://williambyrnes.wordpress.com
quote
radhae
University of California, Hastings College of the Law also has a transfer program from LL.M. to J.D. After you finish one semester of your LL.M., you can apply for the transfer and you would be allowed if you have got good grades. Usually, its allowed for a few students (maybe one or two) in a year.
University of California, Hastings College of the Law also has a transfer program from LL.M. to J.D. After you finish one semester of your LL.M., you can apply for the transfer and you would be allowed if you have got good grades. Usually, its allowed for a few students (maybe one or two) in a year.
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Lisa_I
almost all llm program will transfer 1-2 bright students

But what the point? LSAT is not that difficult, first.
Second, you killing your first year .
almost all llm program will transfer 1-2 bright students

But what the point? LSAT is not that difficult, first.
Second, you killing your first year .
quote
cris25
I'd love to know where I can find information on all the new programs Prof. Byrne refers to. I'm currently graduating from my major -a foreign LLB degree-. Because I'm a US citizen, I'd like to go back to the States and practice law there.

Where can I look into this? LSATs can't be taken in the country I live in, nor in any country close by. Transferring would be a much better option for me -and my pocket-.
I'd love to know where I can find information on all the new programs Prof. Byrne refers to. I'm currently graduating from my major -a foreign LLB degree-. Because I'm a US citizen, I'd like to go back to the States and practice law there.

Where can I look into this? LSATs can't be taken in the country I live in, nor in any country close by. Transferring would be a much better option for me -and my pocket-.
quote
AAAAAstar
I saw in a lot of forums said that even Coulumbia & Chicago allow a transfer but regarding LSAT score, I don't have any information!
I saw in a lot of forums said that even Coulumbia & Chicago allow a transfer but regarding LSAT score, I don't have any information!
quote
Lisa_I
I'd love to know where I can find information on all the new programs Prof. Byrne refers to. I'm currently graduating from my major -a foreign LLB degree-. Because I'm a US citizen, I'd like to go back to the States and practice law there.

Where can I look into this? LSATs can't be taken in the country I live in, nor in any country close by. Transferring would be a much better option for me -and my pocket-.


go and apply for LLM and get admitted, study there for a year and if your grades are good, they might transfer you.
Or go and pass LSAT (you can do it in almost any country!!) and apply for law school, if your score will be great some 2nd tier will give you a scholarship.
<blockquote>I'd love to know where I can find information on all the new programs Prof. Byrne refers to. I'm currently graduating from my major -a foreign LLB degree-. Because I'm a US citizen, I'd like to go back to the States and practice law there.

Where can I look into this? LSATs can't be taken in the country I live in, nor in any country close by. Transferring would be a much better option for me -and my pocket-. </blockquote>

go and apply for LLM and get admitted, study there for a year and if your grades are good, they might transfer you.
Or go and pass LSAT (you can do it in almost any country!!) and apply for law school, if your score will be great some 2nd tier will give you a scholarship.
quote
Lisa_I
I saw in a lot of forums said that even Coulumbia & Chicago allow a transfer but regarding LSAT score, I don't have any information!

no lsat is needed for transfer from LLM to JD
<blockquote>I saw in a lot of forums said that even Coulumbia & Chicago allow a transfer but regarding LSAT score, I don't have any information!</blockquote>
no lsat is needed for transfer from LLM to JD
quote
depaul law school in chicago says they permit foreign lawyers to apply to 2 year jd without lsat and without llm - waiting for response from admissions person!
depaul law school in chicago says they permit foreign lawyers to apply to 2 year jd without lsat and without llm - waiting for response from admissions person!
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Brainy Smu...
Here is a heads up.

From what I have researched. The procedure onto undergoing this process can breach an international student's visa obligation. There will be a lot of back-and-forth processing paperwork while undergoing this procedure. This means reapplying for a new visa. But it might be better residing in the US while renewing your visa. Just prepare yourself for another agonising headache.

Also there are talks about transferring into the second year (2L). These talks consist of students worrying about not acquiring compulsory first year (1L) courses. I doubt that the 1L courses are no different than the first year modules, prescribed, while undergoing their LLB programme.

Gaining admittance is no ordinary walk in the park either. Practically all of the unis below insist transfer students to be in the top 5% of their LLM. The 5% have shown they are eligible to sit for the JD.

Please check these out when you have time:

American
Chicago
Columbia
Depaul
Duke
FSU
GWU
Hawai'i
Miami
PENN
PENN State
Texas Tech
UCHastings
UCLA
UCONN
UNC
USC
UVA
Vanderbilt
WUSL
Here is a heads up.

From what I have researched. The procedure onto undergoing this process can breach an international student's visa obligation. There will be a lot of back-and-forth processing paperwork while undergoing this procedure. This means reapplying for a new visa. But it might be better residing in the US while renewing your visa. Just prepare yourself for another agonising headache.

Also there are talks about transferring into the second year (2L). These talks consist of students worrying about not acquiring compulsory first year (1L) courses. I doubt that the 1L courses are no different than the first year modules, prescribed, while undergoing their LLB programme.

Gaining admittance is no ordinary walk in the park either. Practically all of the unis below insist transfer students to be in the top 5% of their LLM. The 5% have shown they are eligible to sit for the JD.

Please check these out when you have time:

American
Chicago
Columbia
Depaul
Duke
FSU
GWU
Hawai'i
Miami
PENN
PENN State
Texas Tech
UCHastings
UCLA
UCONN
UNC
USC
UVA
Vanderbilt
WUSL
quote
Brent815
Arizona does not require the LSAT for its JD with Advanced Standing program. This program allows those holding a U.S. LLM to transfer up to 17 units from the LLM and 29 units from a non-US law degree, meaning that one can earn a JD in only three semesters (1.5 years).

Arizona accepts applications until May 15th.

Arizona's JDAS program is reasonably priced at $26,000 per year. For more Information see: choosearizonalaw.com/node/65
Or Contact JDAS@law.arizona.edu
Arizona does not require the LSAT for its JD with Advanced Standing program. This program allows those holding a U.S. LLM to transfer up to 17 units from the LLM and 29 units from a non-US law degree, meaning that one can earn a JD in only three semesters (1.5 years).

Arizona accepts applications until May 15th.

Arizona's JDAS program is reasonably priced at $26,000 per year. For more Information see: choosearizonalaw.com/node/65
Or Contact JDAS@law.arizona.edu
quote

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