LLM Job Prospects


Taxlord

Currently a 3L at a t1 school, non t14. About top 35%, with no job prospects. I like tax, and have done well I. All of my tax classes. Thinking about getting a tax LLM from NYU/Gtown/FL. How is the job market if you graduate from one of these within the 50% And given my prior record. Just trying to be realistic, I know I won't graduate top 1% like other people think lol...

Currently a 3L at a t1 school, non t14. About top 35%, with no job prospects. I like tax, and have done well I. All of my tax classes. Thinking about getting a tax LLM from NYU/Gtown/FL. How is the job market if you graduate from one of these within the 50% And given my prior record. Just trying to be realistic, I know I won't graduate top 1% like other people think lol...
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I'm a current NYU tax LLM. Anecdotally, as of May, almost everyone in the class has secured employment. Those who have not yet found a job either have strict geographic limitations or they went to a T4 law school and have no tax background.

If you're looking in NYC and you went to a T1 school, then your worst case scenario is an accounting firm (KPMG at the low end (95,000) and EY at 115,000 on the high end). Law firms in NYC generally pay 160,000. I don't know what they pay in secondary markets, but I've heard of accounting firms offering $75,000.

If you're looking at secondary markets, then it's more of a crapshoot and the LL.M. degree may not pay off. The high degree of specialization isn't really needed outside of big law and the big 4 in NYC and DC. Smaller/regional firms in the middle of the country don't do much high-level tax work and the LLM degree isn't going to help you make inroads with them. If that's your plan, you're better off going the JD/CPA route.

Law firms tend to look primarily at your JD grades and academic pedigree. LLM grades won't sway their decision much one way or the other. Accounting firms will take pretty much anyone with an NYU degree - but you might not get your choice of practice group or geographic area.

In short, if you went to a T1, the NYU degree will get you a job. But at a cost of $85K, it may not justify the expense.


No idea how it works in the USA, but LLM in Europe means nothing without experience or secured position in a company/law firm. To a certain extent one may expect to get some attention from public organisations, but the vast majority of vacancies are being advertised through recruitment agencies nowadays. Sadly, but 90% of their staff would prefer to see even 6 months experience rather than 1 or 2 years studies and distinction. Unless you have secured some kind of bursary or sponsorship, it does not make sense to waste time and money. Ideal scenario, of course, would be career growth with parallel studies.

<blockquote>I'm a current NYU tax LLM. Anecdotally, as of May, almost everyone in the class has secured employment. Those who have not yet found a job either have strict geographic limitations or they went to a T4 law school and have no tax background.

If you're looking in NYC and you went to a T1 school, then your worst case scenario is an accounting firm (KPMG at the low end (95,000) and EY at 115,000 on the high end). Law firms in NYC generally pay 160,000. I don't know what they pay in secondary markets, but I've heard of accounting firms offering $75,000.

If you're looking at secondary markets, then it's more of a crapshoot and the LL.M. degree may not pay off. The high degree of specialization isn't really needed outside of big law and the big 4 in NYC and DC. Smaller/regional firms in the middle of the country don't do much high-level tax work and the LLM degree isn't going to help you make inroads with them. If that's your plan, you're better off going the JD/CPA route.

Law firms tend to look primarily at your JD grades and academic pedigree. LLM grades won't sway their decision much one way or the other. Accounting firms will take pretty much anyone with an NYU degree - but you might not get your choice of practice group or geographic area.

In short, if you went to a T1, the NYU degree will get you a job. But at a cost of $85K, it may not justify the expense.</blockquote>

No idea how it works in the USA, but LLM in Europe means nothing without experience or secured position in a company/law firm. To a certain extent one may expect to get some attention from public organisations, but the vast majority of vacancies are being advertised through recruitment agencies nowadays. Sadly, but 90% of their staff would prefer to see even 6 months experience rather than 1 or 2 years studies and distinction. Unless you have secured some kind of bursary or sponsorship, it does not make sense to waste time and money. Ideal scenario, of course, would be career growth with parallel studies.
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CSJTax

I'm a current NYU tax LLM. Anecdotally, as of May, almost everyone in the class has secured employment. Those who have not yet found a job either have strict geographic limitations or they went to a T4 law school and have no tax background.

If you're looking in NYC and you went to a T1 school, then your worst case scenario is an accounting firm (KPMG at the low end (95,000) and EY at 115,000 on the high end). Law firms in NYC generally pay 160,000. I don't know what they pay in secondary markets, but I've heard of accounting firms offering $75,000.

If you're looking at secondary markets, then it's more of a crapshoot and the LL.M. degree may not pay off. The high degree of specialization isn't really needed outside of big law and the big 4 in NYC and DC. Smaller/regional firms in the middle of the country don't do much high-level tax work and the LLM degree isn't going to help you make inroads with them. If that's your plan, you're better off going the JD/CPA route.

Law firms tend to look primarily at your JD grades and academic pedigree. LLM grades won't sway their decision much one way or the other. Accounting firms will take pretty much anyone with an NYU degree - but you might not get your choice of practice group or geographic area.

In short, if you went to a T1, the NYU degree will get you a job. But at a cost of $85K, it may not justify the expense.


No idea how it works in the USA, but LLM in Europe means nothing without experience or secured position in a company/law firm. To a certain extent one may expect to get some attention from public organisations, but the vast majority of vacancies are being advertised through recruitment agencies nowadays. Sadly, but 90% of their staff would prefer to see even 6 months experience rather than 1 or 2 years studies and distinction. Unless you have secured some kind of bursary or sponsorship, it does not make sense to waste time and money. Ideal scenario, of course, would be career growth with parallel studies.


Wow, I don't understand the negativity about the value of a Tax LLM in the US. Maybe the NYC market is not good. But the DC market is hot right now. And it's not just accounting firms and Big Law. There is a strong demand for Tax LLM DC and surrounding smaller markets, especially if one adds on a certificate program in a specialty. GULC (ranked #2 behind NYU) has specialties in Employee Benefits law, Estate Planning, State and Local Taxation, plus many international certificates.

GULC Tax LLM graduates with these certificates are in high demand, even among mid-sized law firms in suburban markets. And salaries are very strong. Keep asking around . . .

<blockquote><blockquote>I'm a current NYU tax LLM. Anecdotally, as of May, almost everyone in the class has secured employment. Those who have not yet found a job either have strict geographic limitations or they went to a T4 law school and have no tax background.

If you're looking in NYC and you went to a T1 school, then your worst case scenario is an accounting firm (KPMG at the low end (95,000) and EY at 115,000 on the high end). Law firms in NYC generally pay 160,000. I don't know what they pay in secondary markets, but I've heard of accounting firms offering $75,000.

If you're looking at secondary markets, then it's more of a crapshoot and the LL.M. degree may not pay off. The high degree of specialization isn't really needed outside of big law and the big 4 in NYC and DC. Smaller/regional firms in the middle of the country don't do much high-level tax work and the LLM degree isn't going to help you make inroads with them. If that's your plan, you're better off going the JD/CPA route.

Law firms tend to look primarily at your JD grades and academic pedigree. LLM grades won't sway their decision much one way or the other. Accounting firms will take pretty much anyone with an NYU degree - but you might not get your choice of practice group or geographic area.

In short, if you went to a T1, the NYU degree will get you a job. But at a cost of $85K, it may not justify the expense.</blockquote>

No idea how it works in the USA, but LLM in Europe means nothing without experience or secured position in a company/law firm. To a certain extent one may expect to get some attention from public organisations, but the vast majority of vacancies are being advertised through recruitment agencies nowadays. Sadly, but 90% of their staff would prefer to see even 6 months experience rather than 1 or 2 years studies and distinction. Unless you have secured some kind of bursary or sponsorship, it does not make sense to waste time and money. Ideal scenario, of course, would be career growth with parallel studies.</blockquote>

Wow, I don't understand the negativity about the value of a Tax LLM in the US. Maybe the NYC market is not good. But the DC market is hot right now. And it's not just accounting firms and Big Law. There is a strong demand for Tax LLM DC and surrounding smaller markets, especially if one adds on a certificate program in a specialty. GULC (ranked #2 behind NYU) has specialties in Employee Benefits law, Estate Planning, State and Local Taxation, plus many international certificates.

GULC Tax LLM graduates with these certificates are in high demand, even among mid-sized law firms in suburban markets. And salaries are very strong. Keep asking around . . .
quote
KJP

Hi, CSJTax. Would this be true for other concentrations, as well?

Hi, CSJTax. Would this be true for other concentrations, as well?
quote

I'm a current NYU tax LLM. Anecdotally, as of May, almost everyone in the class has secured employment. Those who have not yet found a job either have strict geographic limitations or they went to a T4 law school and have no tax background.

If you're looking in NYC and you went to a T1 school, then your worst case scenario is an accounting firm (KPMG at the low end (95,000) and EY at 115,000 on the high end). Law firms in NYC generally pay 160,000. I don't know what they pay in secondary markets, but I've heard of accounting firms offering $75,000.

If you're looking at secondary markets, then it's more of a crapshoot and the LL.M. degree may not pay off. The high degree of specialization isn't really needed outside of big law and the big 4 in NYC and DC. Smaller/regional firms in the middle of the country don't do much high-level tax work and the LLM degree isn't going to help you make inroads with them. If that's your plan, you're better off going the JD/CPA route.

Law firms tend to look primarily at your JD grades and academic pedigree. LLM grades won't sway their decision much one way or the other. Accounting firms will take pretty much anyone with an NYU degree - but you might not get your choice of practice group or geographic area.

In short, if you went to a T1, the NYU degree will get you a job. But at a cost of $85K, it may not justify the expense.


No idea how it works in the USA, but LLM in Europe means nothing without experience or secured position in a company/law firm. To a certain extent one may expect to get some attention from public organisations, but the vast majority of vacancies are being advertised through recruitment agencies nowadays. Sadly, but 90% of their staff would prefer to see even 6 months experience rather than 1 or 2 years studies and distinction. Unless you have secured some kind of bursary or sponsorship, it does not make sense to waste time and money. Ideal scenario, of course, would be career growth with parallel studies.


Wow, I don't understand the negativity about the value of a Tax LLM in the US. Maybe the NYC market is not good. But the DC market is hot right now. And it's not just accounting firms and Big Law. There is a strong demand for Tax LLM DC and surrounding smaller markets, especially if one adds on a certificate program in a specialty. GULC (ranked #2 behind NYU) has specialties in Employee Benefits law, Estate Planning, State and Local Taxation, plus many international certificates.

GULC Tax LLM graduates with these certificates are in high demand, even among mid-sized law firms in suburban markets. And salaries are very strong. Keep asking around . . .


I graduated from GULC within the past couple of years and had the total opposite experience of CSJTax. The DC market wasn't so hot when I graduated and it still isn't. I have a fair number of LL.M. colleagues that are still looking for tax jobs in DC. My experiences were identical to hardtohandle's at NYU.

For every person who got a job through school recruiting, there was one who didn't. Because almost all Big 4 and law firm entry-level jobs that would require an LL.M. are filled through TIP (NYU/GULC's joint annual spring recruiting) or the school's Symplicity site, it's extremely difficult to find a job at these places outside of school recruiting. The people who walked from GULC empty handed were seen as "missing the boat" and ultimately took non-tax or even non-legal jobs.

As hardtohandle mentioned, it was my experience as well that the Big 4 and small law firms in smaller markets weren't interested in an LL.M. and required or at least preferred an accounting degree.

As far as strong salaries go, most people who were lucky enough to get jobs at the Big 4 complained about the salary. Outside of M&A and International in a major market, you're really getting paid an accountant's salary to do an accountant's job. Small firms are notorious for low pay and the ones that specialize in tax usually aren't any better.

I don't mean to sound negative but these were just my experiences.

<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>I'm a current NYU tax LLM. Anecdotally, as of May, almost everyone in the class has secured employment. Those who have not yet found a job either have strict geographic limitations or they went to a T4 law school and have no tax background.

If you're looking in NYC and you went to a T1 school, then your worst case scenario is an accounting firm (KPMG at the low end (95,000) and EY at 115,000 on the high end). Law firms in NYC generally pay 160,000. I don't know what they pay in secondary markets, but I've heard of accounting firms offering $75,000.

If you're looking at secondary markets, then it's more of a crapshoot and the LL.M. degree may not pay off. The high degree of specialization isn't really needed outside of big law and the big 4 in NYC and DC. Smaller/regional firms in the middle of the country don't do much high-level tax work and the LLM degree isn't going to help you make inroads with them. If that's your plan, you're better off going the JD/CPA route.

Law firms tend to look primarily at your JD grades and academic pedigree. LLM grades won't sway their decision much one way or the other. Accounting firms will take pretty much anyone with an NYU degree - but you might not get your choice of practice group or geographic area.

In short, if you went to a T1, the NYU degree will get you a job. But at a cost of $85K, it may not justify the expense.</blockquote>

No idea how it works in the USA, but LLM in Europe means nothing without experience or secured position in a company/law firm. To a certain extent one may expect to get some attention from public organisations, but the vast majority of vacancies are being advertised through recruitment agencies nowadays. Sadly, but 90% of their staff would prefer to see even 6 months experience rather than 1 or 2 years studies and distinction. Unless you have secured some kind of bursary or sponsorship, it does not make sense to waste time and money. Ideal scenario, of course, would be career growth with parallel studies.</blockquote>

Wow, I don't understand the negativity about the value of a Tax LLM in the US. Maybe the NYC market is not good. But the DC market is hot right now. And it's not just accounting firms and Big Law. There is a strong demand for Tax LLM DC and surrounding smaller markets, especially if one adds on a certificate program in a specialty. GULC (ranked #2 behind NYU) has specialties in Employee Benefits law, Estate Planning, State and Local Taxation, plus many international certificates.

GULC Tax LLM graduates with these certificates are in high demand, even among mid-sized law firms in suburban markets. And salaries are very strong. Keep asking around . . .</blockquote>

I graduated from GULC within the past couple of years and had the total opposite experience of CSJTax. The DC market wasn't so hot when I graduated and it still isn't. I have a fair number of LL.M. colleagues that are still looking for tax jobs in DC. My experiences were identical to hardtohandle's at NYU.

For every person who got a job through school recruiting, there was one who didn't. Because almost all Big 4 and law firm entry-level jobs that would require an LL.M. are filled through TIP (NYU/GULC's joint annual spring recruiting) or the school's Symplicity site, it's extremely difficult to find a job at these places outside of school recruiting. The people who walked from GULC empty handed were seen as "missing the boat" and ultimately took non-tax or even non-legal jobs.

As hardtohandle mentioned, it was my experience as well that the Big 4 and small law firms in smaller markets weren't interested in an LL.M. and required or at least preferred an accounting degree.

As far as strong salaries go, most people who were lucky enough to get jobs at the Big 4 complained about the salary. Outside of M&A and International in a major market, you're really getting paid an accountant's salary to do an accountant's job. Small firms are notorious for low pay and the ones that specialize in tax usually aren't any better.

I don't mean to sound negative but these were just my experiences.

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