LLM for the wrong reasons?


JamesJ

I attend a tier 2 school and am considering seeking a LLM pretty much just to have a law degree from a top law school. Therefore, my reasons really are really just ego-based and to "pad" my resume.

Question: assuming I could get into a top LLM program (I am currently top of my class), would this be a silly reason to get an LLM? Do employers/legal professionals even care about an LLM degree from a top law school?

Further facts: I already have a great job and I don't plan on going into academia.

Thanks for your thoughtful advice.

I attend a tier 2 school and am considering seeking a LLM pretty much just to have a law degree from a top law school. Therefore, my reasons really are really just ego-based and to "pad" my resume.

Question: assuming I could get into a top LLM program (I am currently top of my class), would this be a silly reason to get an LLM? Do employers/legal professionals even care about an LLM degree from a top law school?

Further facts: I already have a great job and I don't plan on going into academia.

Thanks for your thoughtful advice.
quote
JamesJ

Bump....

To all the "viewers," please offer your opinions!

Bump....

To all the "viewers," please offer your opinions!
quote
ColumbiaJo...

Why do you want to pad your resume if you already have a great job? Are there other reasons - like a year in a foreign country or a new area of law you've been curious about?

Why do you want to pad your resume if you already have a great job? Are there other reasons - like a year in a foreign country or a new area of law you've been curious about?
quote
JamesJ

I mean "pad" in the sense that I would have a degree from a top-notch law school.

I mean "pad" in the sense that I would have a degree from a top-notch law school.
quote
legaldocs

I`d talk to my employer were I in your shoes.

Ask him about his opinion about receivng a LLM by his associates, will it benefit the firm, make your way to partnership smoother, etc?

Otherwise, why should you invest money in LLM if you already hold a good job?

I`d talk to my employer were I in your shoes.

Ask him about his opinion about receivng a LLM by his associates, will it benefit the firm, make your way to partnership smoother, etc?

Otherwise, why should you invest money in LLM if you already hold a good job?
quote
JDI

I think the LLM would be a waste of time and money unless you were unemployed with no prospects. Work experience is by far your best vehicle to impress - not a top tier LLM. If anything, the LLM might demote your attractiveness because you ended up top of your class in your JD and might not be as successful in the LLM. I feel it is more impressive to have high grades at a subpar than average grades at a top tier.

I think the LLM would be a waste of time and money unless you were unemployed with no prospects. Work experience is by far your best vehicle to impress - not a top tier LLM. If anything, the LLM might demote your attractiveness because you ended up top of your class in your JD and might not be as successful in the LLM. I feel it is more impressive to have high grades at a subpar than average grades at a top tier.
quote
ADOP

It seems that you really want it, therefore you should do that LL.M. Do not live with that kind of regret.

The only problem, is that an LL.M. is an expensive "option", but if you can afford it, I tell you again..do it!

The other posts are very interesting and analyse well your situation, but I feel that the way you are about the LLMs is more emotional than rational, so do not think too much about pros and cons, apply to top law schools and enjoy!

It seems that you really want it, therefore you should do that LL.M. Do not live with that kind of regret.

The only problem, is that an LL.M. is an expensive "option", but if you can afford it, I tell you again..do it!

The other posts are very interesting and analyse well your situation, but I feel that the way you are about the LLMs is more emotional than rational, so do not think too much about pros and cons, apply to top law schools and enjoy!
quote
tmalmine

I tend to agree with ADOP. If you already have a JD degree and a good job, I don't think LL.M. will pad your resume that much. But if you want a change of pace, study for a year in international environment, and so forth, LL.M. would be a good option. Strictly materially speaking, it doesn't seem to offer very good cost/benefit-ratio, considering your situation.

I tend to agree with ADOP. If you already have a JD degree and a good job, I don't think LL.M. will pad your resume that much. But if you want a change of pace, study for a year in international environment, and so forth, LL.M. would be a good option. Strictly materially speaking, it doesn't seem to offer very good cost/benefit-ratio, considering your situation.
quote
JamesJ

I really appreciate your opinions! It definitely would not likely make sense per a "cost/benefit" analysis, I agree (but who knows). For me it is more about attending a top program at a top school. On the other hand, maybe I should be less degree conscious and move on?

I really appreciate your opinions! It definitely would not likely make sense per a "cost/benefit" analysis, I agree (but who knows). For me it is more about attending a top program at a top school. On the other hand, maybe I should be less degree conscious and move on?
quote
aurora

You have the rest of your life to work...

There is definitely something to be said for spending another year maturing in your discipline. Aside from this so called 'padding' of your resume by sheer dint of having a degree from an excellent institution, an LL.M. is an opportunity to branch out and study new areas that you might not have been free to study when you were choosing J.D. courses geared to securing your attractive job.

You could study cross-disciplinary subjects and learn to take theoretical approaches in your masters' year that will help you when you are approaching contracts, criminal work, whatever!

You applied, you got in... if your job will be waiting for you at the end of the LL.M, then why not? You are doubting your inclination now, but doubt today is better than the regret you might have in the future.

Best of luck with whatever you choose!

You have the rest of your life to work...

There is definitely something to be said for spending another year maturing in your discipline. Aside from this so called 'padding' of your resume by sheer dint of having a degree from an excellent institution, an LL.M. is an opportunity to branch out and study new areas that you might not have been free to study when you were choosing J.D. courses geared to securing your attractive job.

You could study cross-disciplinary subjects and learn to take theoretical approaches in your masters' year that will help you when you are approaching contracts, criminal work, whatever!

You applied, you got in... if your job will be waiting for you at the end of the LL.M, then why not? You are doubting your inclination now, but doubt today is better than the regret you might have in the future.

Best of luck with whatever you choose!
quote

Reply to Post

Hot Discussions