L.L.M Graduated


waelsalem
I recently Graduated from University of Alabama, with L.L.M Degree, and i'm trying to find a job, but so far it's very hard to find one, either jobs require bar exam, or for assistance job i'm over qualified, i really dont know what to do.
i'm an American Citizen, so i dont need any kind of visa
I recently Graduated from University of Alabama, with L.L.M Degree, and i'm trying to find a job, but so far it's very hard to find one, either jobs require bar exam, or for assistance job i'm over qualified, i really dont know what to do.
i'm an American Citizen, so i dont need any kind of visa
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The answer is rather pretty simple*just pass bar exams.
How re you supposed to work as lawyer when you re not that quallified? Even as an assistant
The answer is rather pretty simple*just pass bar exams.
How re you supposed to work as lawyer when you re not that quallified? Even as an assistant
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waelsalem
The answer is rather pretty simple*just pass bar exams.
How re you supposed to work as lawyer when you re not that quallified? Even as an assistant

and how am I suppose to support my family and myself through the time between graduation and the bar exam results, I think companies and law firms should be a bit flexible
<blockquote>The answer is rather pretty simple*just pass bar exams.
How re you supposed to work as lawyer when you re not that quallified? Even as an assistant </blockquote>
and how am I suppose to support my family and myself through the time between graduation and the bar exam results, I think companies and law firms should be a bit flexible
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j-train
I kind of have to agree to ProLawyer#not. Though you may be in a tough situation financially, you have to face the reality and should have planned this before even attending a LLM. Instead of complaining that companies and law firms are not being a bit more flexible, i think you have to look from the other side as well. What is your strength compared to other potential candidates? Although I am not sure what types of jobs you are looking for, if there was a candidate which are qualified and the other not, which would you hire?

Though it may be difficult in the short term, passing the bar seems to be the most efficient and quickest way for you if you want to stay in the US and get a job in the legal field.
Or try to get a job where it is not legal related so that you won't be asked of being passed a bar exam.
The status of having a LLM degree is not worth that much.
I kind of have to agree to ProLawyer#not. Though you may be in a tough situation financially, you have to face the reality and should have planned this before even attending a LLM. Instead of complaining that companies and law firms are not being a bit more flexible, i think you have to look from the other side as well. What is your strength compared to other potential candidates? Although I am not sure what types of jobs you are looking for, if there was a candidate which are qualified and the other not, which would you hire?

Though it may be difficult in the short term, passing the bar seems to be the most efficient and quickest way for you if you want to stay in the US and get a job in the legal field.
Or try to get a job where it is not legal related so that you won't be asked of being passed a bar exam.
The status of having a LLM degree is not worth that much.
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grumpyJD
You have my sympathy but there's no simple solution...and your expectations for prospective employers are not realistic. So many people on these boards are always asking about post-LLM job opportunities in the US/UK/EU/Aus?Canada and the same warnings are always repeated. People launch themselves into expensive LLM programs with the mistaken belief that it will lead to future employment in a foreign country. In most cases, it won't happen unless you are admitted to practice and have legal immigration status. There are some very rare exceptions but none of us are immune to these facts and there is no point complaining.
You have my sympathy but there's no simple solution...and your expectations for prospective employers are not realistic. So many people on these boards are always asking about post-LLM job opportunities in the US/UK/EU/Aus?Canada and the same warnings are always repeated. People launch themselves into expensive LLM programs with the mistaken belief that it will lead to future employment in a foreign country. In most cases, it won't happen unless you are admitted to practice and have legal immigration status. There are some very rare exceptions but none of us are immune to these facts and there is no point complaining.
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hoo89
Firms actually do contemplate that, it's generally a misconception that they don't. However, they're not going to contemplate it for someone who has not received an offer from them yet (and if you manage for them to contemplate that without having made you an offer, you have struck the rarest gold in my opinion).
This is to say, a firm may contemplate the time it takes to pass the bar exam, and some allow for their incoming associates (many of them receive their employment offer after interning at the firm during the summer after second year or if you work with them during the school year when your internship time is done) to do non-legal work. However, this is usually the case for students who have already worked at the firm and received an offer.
Otherwise, you would be expecting a firm who is not familiar with how you work to take the risk of hiring you and give you the time to pass the bar. They don't know how you perform, and they don't know if you will pass. With former summer associates they at least have one of those prongs solved.
LLM degrees in the US are mostly targeted at (A) foreign lawyers to specialise and go back home or (B) foreign-trained lawyers who want to sit for the bar to gain employment. Sitting for the bar is always in the mix when it comes to legal practice in the US, it's always been like that. It's not necessarily how the firms and companies deal with it, but how students plan for it after receiving an offer. If you're looking for employment AFTER graduating, it will definitely be harder, because unless you passed the bar, comparatively with other students from your graduation year, you will be at a disadvantage.
Firms actually do contemplate that, it's generally a misconception that they don't. However, they're not going to contemplate it for someone who has not received an offer from them yet (and if you manage for them to contemplate that without having made you an offer, you have struck the rarest gold in my opinion).
This is to say, a firm may contemplate the time it takes to pass the bar exam, and some allow for their incoming associates (many of them receive their employment offer after interning at the firm during the summer after second year or if you work with them during the school year when your internship time is done) to do non-legal work. However, this is usually the case for students who have already worked at the firm and received an offer.
Otherwise, you would be expecting a firm who is not familiar with how you work to take the risk of hiring you and give you the time to pass the bar. They don't know how you perform, and they don't know if you will pass. With former summer associates they at least have one of those prongs solved.
LLM degrees in the US are mostly targeted at (A) foreign lawyers to specialise and go back home or (B) foreign-trained lawyers who want to sit for the bar to gain employment. Sitting for the bar is always in the mix when it comes to legal practice in the US, it's always been like that. It's not necessarily how the firms and companies deal with it, but how students plan for it after receiving an offer. If you're looking for employment AFTER graduating, it will definitely be harder, because unless you passed the bar, comparatively with other students from your graduation year, you will be at a disadvantage.
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waelsalem
thank you all for the advices
i'm an American Citizen so i have no problem with the Legal statues to work in the United states.
i'm planning to take the bar exam in february 2017.
all i was asking is why there are no lawfirms take the LLM graduates as an intern, to practice what they learned at law school, they need it as much as the J.D students.
that makes me wonder if i pass the bar exam, can i really find a job as a lawyer? is lawfirms hire only J.D graduates? was it worth it to spend around $60K for an education that won't help me a bit ?
thank you all for the advices
i'm an American Citizen so i have no problem with the Legal statues to work in the United states.
i'm planning to take the bar exam in february 2017.
all i was asking is why there are no lawfirms take the LLM graduates as an intern, to practice what they learned at law school, they need it as much as the J.D students.
that makes me wonder if i pass the bar exam, can i really find a job as a lawyer? is lawfirms hire only J.D graduates? was it worth it to spend around $60K for an education that won't help me a bit ?
quote
thank you all for the advices
i'm an American Citizen so i have no problem with the Legal statues to work in the United states.
i'm planning to take the bar exam in february 2017.
all i was asking is why there are no lawfirms take the LLM graduates as an intern, to practice what they learned at law school, they need it as much as the J.D students.
that makes me wonder if i pass the bar exam, can i really find a job as a lawyer? is lawfirms hire only J.D graduates? was it worth it to spend around $60K for an education that won't help me a bit ?


I wish you would write an article about your experiences and your conclusions, so as to warn any potential LLM students away from heading down the same path with unrealistic goals.

Also, many(most) JD graduates don't have job offers until they pass the bar. That's why the US News rankings look at job placement statistics at 3mth, 6mth and 9th after graduation.
<blockquote>thank you all for the advices
i'm an American Citizen so i have no problem with the Legal statues to work in the United states.
i'm planning to take the bar exam in february 2017.
all i was asking is why there are no lawfirms take the LLM graduates as an intern, to practice what they learned at law school, they need it as much as the J.D students.
that makes me wonder if i pass the bar exam, can i really find a job as a lawyer? is lawfirms hire only J.D graduates? was it worth it to spend around $60K for an education that won't help me a bit ? </blockquote>

I wish you would write an article about your experiences and your conclusions, so as to warn any potential LLM students away from heading down the same path with unrealistic goals.

Also, many(most) JD graduates don't have job offers until they pass the bar. That's why the US News rankings look at job placement statistics at 3mth, 6mth and 9th after graduation.
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imnc
thank you all for the advices
i'm an American Citizen so i have no problem with the Legal statues to work in the United states.
i'm planning to take the bar exam in february 2017.
all i was asking is why there are no lawfirms take the LLM graduates as an intern, to practice what they learned at law school, they need it as much as the J.D students.
that makes me wonder if i pass the bar exam, can i really find a job as a lawyer? is lawfirms hire only J.D graduates? was it worth it to spend around $60K for an education that won't help me a bit ?


Why should a law firm expend time understanding the level of knowledge or competence of an LLM for an internship or a job when they have loads of JD lawyers out there vying for the same position. It' s not an efficient strategy. The presumption with LLMs is that they are only 1/3 as good as a JD, usually worse.
<blockquote>thank you all for the advices
i'm an American Citizen so i have no problem with the Legal statues to work in the United states.
i'm planning to take the bar exam in february 2017.
all i was asking is why there are no lawfirms take the LLM graduates as an intern, to practice what they learned at law school, they need it as much as the J.D students.
that makes me wonder if i pass the bar exam, can i really find a job as a lawyer? is lawfirms hire only J.D graduates? was it worth it to spend around $60K for an education that won't help me a bit ? </blockquote>

Why should a law firm expend time understanding the level of knowledge or competence of an LLM for an internship or a job when they have loads of JD lawyers out there vying for the same position. It' s not an efficient strategy. The presumption with LLMs is that they are only 1/3 as good as a JD, usually worse.
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gkh_2005
I think you should apply for a Contracts Manager/Contracts Analyst/Contracts Specialist position. Without passing the bar exam, it will not be possible to gain employment as an Attorney. I presume you have a law degree from a foreign country and the best option would have been to do the 2 year J.D. for foreign lawyers.

Even if you have passed the bar exam, it will still be difficult to get a job as an Attorney and this has been my experience. I have a LL.M.and have passed the New York State bar exam, however still not been able to find an Attorney position.

LL.M is good only if you plan to return back to your home country.People who presume that having LL.M will open door to job opportunities in United States will be disappointed. I would advice all prospective LL.M. students to do proper research before spending their hard earned money to do LL.M. in the US, so that they don't regret later. Good luck with your job search!
I think you should apply for a Contracts Manager/Contracts Analyst/Contracts Specialist position. Without passing the bar exam, it will not be possible to gain employment as an Attorney. I presume you have a law degree from a foreign country and the best option would have been to do the 2 year J.D. for foreign lawyers.

Even if you have passed the bar exam, it will still be difficult to get a job as an Attorney and this has been my experience. I have a LL.M.and have passed the New York State bar exam, however still not been able to find an Attorney position.

LL.M is good only if you plan to return back to your home country.People who presume that having LL.M will open door to job opportunities in United States will be disappointed. I would advice all prospective LL.M. students to do proper research before spending their hard earned money to do LL.M. in the US, so that they don't regret later. Good luck with your job search!
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actarus
Hi there, where would you recommend to pass the bar exam? I'd like to practice immigration law which is federal. I'd like to find a jurisdiction where is easy.
Thanks
Hi there, where would you recommend to pass the bar exam? I'd like to practice immigration law which is federal. I'd like to find a jurisdiction where is easy.
Thanks
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gkh_2005
I feel the Alabama Bar exam is easy to pass. New York and California are the toughest bar exams.
I feel the Alabama Bar exam is easy to pass. New York and California are the toughest bar exams.
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actarus
Do you have some fact regarding Alabama bar exam?
Do you have some fact regarding Alabama bar exam?
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Do you have some fact regarding Alabama bar exam?



http://www.ncbex.org/publications/statistics/

Statistics for you to check on the passing rate.
It's fairly easy to find by google.
<blockquote>Do you have some fact regarding Alabama bar exam?</blockquote>


http://www.ncbex.org/publications/statistics/

Statistics for you to check on the passing rate.
It's fairly easy to find by google.
quote

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