How to prepare for the NY bar exam before the start of the LL.M. year?


Capella

Hi all,

I am a prospective LL.M. student and I intend to sit for the NY bar exam in July 2021 (given that the date will remain the same). I will end up taking a commercial prep course as many others but I'd like to start preparing for it from now.

Do you guys have any suggestions? Any particular books? Specific platforms? Any tips?

Thank you for your (much needed) help!

[Edited by Capella on Apr 26, 2020]

Hi all,

I am a prospective LL.M. student and I intend to sit for the NY bar exam in July 2021 (given that the date will remain the same). I will end up taking a commercial prep course as many others but I'd like to start preparing for it from now.

Do you guys have any suggestions? Any particular books? Specific platforms? Any tips?

Thank you for your (much needed) help!
quote
jwpetterch...

Hi all,

I am a prospective LL.M. student and I intend to sit for the NY bar exam in July 2021 (given that the date will remain the same). I will end up taking a commercial prep course as many others but I'd like to start preparing for it from now.

Do you guys have any suggestions? Any particular books? Specific platforms? Any tips?

Thank you for your (much needed) help!

You might be able to illegally download the Barbri course and watch/listen to the lectures. It was on BitTorrent back in the Good old days. We did this years ago when our cut rate prep course went south. Alternatively, go on eBay and buy an old BarBri conviser, which is the standard bar prep book of outlines.

[quote]Hi all,

I am a prospective LL.M. student and I intend to sit for the NY bar exam in July 2021 (given that the date will remain the same). I will end up taking a commercial prep course as many others but I'd like to start preparing for it from now.

Do you guys have any suggestions? Any particular books? Specific platforms? Any tips?

Thank you for your (much needed) help![/quote]<div><br></div><div>You might be able to illegally download the Barbri course and watch/listen to the lectures. It was on BitTorrent back in the Good old days. We did this years ago when our cut rate prep course went south. Alternatively, go on eBay and buy an old BarBri conviser, which is the standard bar prep book of outlines.</div>
quote
#

Hi! Be careful not to wear yourself out or get disgusted by starting to study too early for the NYBE. Don't forget that in order to get the NY bar you need to pass few other tests: MPRE, NYLC/NYLE.

I would recommend you to first focus on the MPRE (https://www.nybarexam.org/MPRE/MPRE.html). There is usually an exam session each  3 months, the next one is scheduled on August 11 or 12, 2020 (be careful to not fail the  deadline for the registration). You can pass this exam 3 years before or after passing the NYBE. I recommend to sit this exam as soon as possible in order to be free about that during your LLM year. 
- Cons: it's an on campus exam, so you need to be in US.
- Pro: You can order for free the prep review material on Barbri or Kaplan.

Then, you can focus on the NYLE/NYLC (https://www.nybarexam.org/Content/CourseMaterials.htm). "The NYLC consists of approximately 17 hours of video lectures with embedded questions that must be answered correctly before you may continue viewing the lecture." To register for the NYLE you need to complete the NYLC at least 1 month before the exam date. I recommend to sit the December exam session of the NYLE in order to handle this exam during winter break. About the timing, you can cannot pass this exam more than 1 year before sitting for the first time the NYBE (July 2021 in your case).
- Cons: if you fail the NYLE, you need to watch again the 17h videos before registering for the next NYLE.
- Pro: (1) the study material is a free PDF provided by the BOLE/NYBE's websiite; and (2) the NYLC/NYLE are online operated, so can sit the exam from your  home, parents' home, etc. 

Otherwise, you can access for free an legally to a part of the barbri's outline with Lexis-Nexis (it's almost the same than the bar prep version's books): http://lexisnexis.custhelp.com/app/answers/answer_view/a_id/1090745/~/barbri-outlines- .
If you don't have yet your access to Lexis-Nexis, your law school should provide you the access at the beginning of the LLM year (it's usually required for the legal writting classes)

[Edited by # on Apr 27, 2020]

Hi!&nbsp;Be careful not to wear yourself out or get disgusted by starting to study too early for the NYBE. Don't forget that in order to get the NY bar you need to pass few other tests: MPRE, NYLC/NYLE.<div><br></div><div><br></div><div>I would recommend you to first focus on the [b]MPRE[/b] (<a href="https://www.nybarexam.org/MPRE/MPRE.html">https://www.nybarexam.org/MPRE/MPRE.html</a>). There is usually an exam session each&nbsp; 3 months, the next one is scheduled on August 11 or 12, 2020 (be careful to not fail the&nbsp; deadline for the registration). You can pass this exam 3 years before or after passing the NYBE. I recommend to sit this exam as soon as possible in order to be free about that during your LLM year.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>- [u]Cons[/u]: it's an on campus exam, so you need to be in US.</div><div><br></div><div>- [u]Pro[/u]: You can order for free the prep review material on Barbri or Kaplan.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Then, you can focus on the [b]NYLE/NYLC[/b] (<a href="https://www.nybarexam.org/Content/CourseMaterials.htm">https://www.nybarexam.org/Content/CourseMaterials.htm</a>). "[i]The NYLC consists of approximately 17 hours of video lectures with embedded questions that must be answered correctly before you may continue viewing the lecture.[/i]" To register for the NYLE you need to complete the NYLC at least 1 month before the exam date. I recommend to sit the December exam session of the NYLE in order to handle this exam during winter break. About the timing, you can cannot pass this exam more than 1 year before sitting for the first time the NYBE (July 2021 in your case).</div><div><br></div><div>- [u]Cons[/u]: if you fail the NYLE, you need to watch again the 17h videos before registering for the next NYLE.</div><div><br></div><div>- [u]Pro[/u]: (1) the study material is a free PDF provided by the BOLE/NYBE's websiite; and (2) the NYLC/NYLE are online operated, so can sit the exam from your&nbsp; home, parents' home, etc.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Otherwise, you can access [u]for free an legally[/u] to a part of the [b]barbri's outline with Lexis-Nexis[/b] (it's almost the same than the bar prep version's books):&nbsp;<a href="http://lexisnexis.custhelp.com/app/answers/answer_view/a_id/1090745/~/barbri-outlines-" style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">http://lexisnexis.custhelp.com/app/answers/answer_view/a_id/1090745/~/barbri-outlines-</a>&nbsp;.</div><div><br></div><div>If you don't have yet your access to Lexis-Nexis, your law school should provide you the access at the beginning of the LLM year (it's usually required for the legal writting classes)</div>
quote

Hi Capella,
I would recommend the BARBRI Extended Bar Review. You can prepare in 6 or 10-months for the examination with the support of a mentor. As a foreign-trained attorney, who has sat for a US bar examination, I wouldn't recommend studying by yourself with books and outlines. The bar exam it's a hard test and requires preparation. 
I wouldn't recommend downloading illegal material from the internet as suggested by another student here (this is crime!). The BARBRI prep course is not only videos of lectures and outlines. You will have a Study Plan and thousands of practice questions on the online platform. You will also be able to track your progress and study according to your weaknesses. 
Also, the other tests mentioned above NYLC, NYLE and MPRE are easier. The NYLC is just a course (can be done after you pass the bar exam) and the NYLE is an open book exam (can also be done after the bar examination). The MPRE is a short exam and you will need less than a week to prep for it!

[Edited by julianadelpesco on Apr 29, 2020]

<div>Hi Capella,</div><div><br></div><div>I would recommend the BARBRI Extended Bar Review. You can prepare in 6 or 10-months for the examination with the support of a mentor. As a foreign-trained attorney, who has sat for a US bar examination, I wouldn't recommend studying by yourself with books and outlines. The bar exam it's a hard test and requires preparation.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>I wouldn't recommend downloading illegal material from the internet as suggested by another student here (this is crime!). The BARBRI prep course is not only videos of lectures and outlines. You will have a Study Plan and thousands of practice questions on the online platform. You will also be able to track your progress and study according to your weaknesses.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>Also, the other tests mentioned above NYLC, NYLE and MPRE are easier. The NYLC is just a course (can be done after you pass the bar exam) and the NYLE is an open book exam (can also be done after the bar examination). The MPRE is a short exam and you will need less than a week to prep for it!</div>
quote

The BARBRI bar review is definitely the most comprehensive in my experience. With that being said, it only works if you stay disciplined and closely follow its schedule. So if you choose BARBRI, understand that falling behind is a dangerous game. You really only need to do 80% of BARBRI's material too -- its that much (one way to save time is to not do all of the practice essays they give you, but outline some). If you decide to dedicate an 8-week time frame to dilligent preparation and nothing else (which I believe is all you need if you are truly committed) then I would take a mock exam halfway through this 8-week period. Though they are extremely long and tedious -- and hard to get yourself to do -- locking yourself in your room and completing a 7 hour exam for a day will prepare you for what the exam is actually like. Also, it will let you know what your strengths are and you will also be able to identify areas of improvement. Additionally, always complete practice exams under time constraints, as being able to manage your time during the exam is crucial. Sadly, there is no magic solution to passing the bar but hard work. To succeed, you need to be disciplined and focused. Find a quiet working place where you can eliminate outside distractions. The exam is difficult but of course doable. Establishing a consistent study schedule is essential -- good luck!


The BARBRI bar review is definitely the most comprehensive in my experience. With that being said, it only works if you stay disciplined and closely follow its schedule. So if you choose BARBRI, understand that falling behind is a dangerous game. You really only need to do 80% of BARBRI's material too -- its that much (one way to save time is to not do all of the practice essays they give you, but outline some). If you decide to dedicate an 8-week time frame to dilligent preparation and nothing else (which I believe is all you need if you are truly committed) then I would take a mock exam halfway through this 8-week period. Though they are extremely long and tedious -- and hard to get yourself to do -- locking yourself in your room and completing a 7 hour exam for a day will prepare you for what the exam is actually like. Also, it will let you know what your strengths are and you will also be able to identify areas of improvement. Additionally, always complete practice exams under time constraints, as being able to manage your time during the exam is crucial. Sadly, there is no magic solution to passing the bar but hard work. To succeed, you need to be disciplined and focused. Find a quiet working place where you can eliminate outside distractions. The exam is difficult but of course doable. Establishing a consistent study schedule is essential -- good luck!<br><br><br>
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