Harvard / Columbia / NYU - which is best on Public Law/ Constitutional Law/ Human Rights?


Hi everyone!

I'm a lecturer in law at a university in Sri Lanka! I'm looking at applying to Harvard, NYU and Columbia for their next intake (2018-2019). I had a question that I was hoping for some help on though!

My main areas of interest are public law/constitutional law and human rights law. I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts of which of these three were best for these kinds of areas? By best I'm thinking of professors in the field, as well as in terms of seminars, internships, legal aid programs etc?

Based on what I've heard, NYU seems to have some of the best professors in the field for these areas. I was told that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than the ones I am interested in. Not very sure about how accurate this stuff is, so was wondering if anyone had any info :)

If there are other US universities that are better than the three I've mentioned in these areas, please suggest them :D

Thank you!
Hi everyone!

I'm a lecturer in law at a university in Sri Lanka! I'm looking at applying to Harvard, NYU and Columbia for their next intake (2018-2019). I had a question that I was hoping for some help on though!

My main areas of interest are public law/constitutional law and human rights law. I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts of which of these three were best for these kinds of areas? By best I'm thinking of professors in the field, as well as in terms of seminars, internships, legal aid programs etc?

Based on what I've heard, NYU seems to have some of the best professors in the field for these areas. I was told that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than the ones I am interested in. Not very sure about how accurate this stuff is, so was wondering if anyone had any info :)

If there are other US universities that are better than the three I've mentioned in these areas, please suggest them :D

Thank you!
quote
Hi everyone!

I'm a lecturer in law at a university in Sri Lanka! I'm looking at applying to Harvard, NYU and Columbia for their next intake (2018-2019). I had a question that I was hoping for some help on though!

My main areas of interest are public law/constitutional law and human rights law. I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts of which of these three were best for these kinds of areas? By best I'm thinking of professors in the field, as well as in terms of seminars, internships, legal aid programs etc?

Based on what I've heard, NYU seems to have some of the best professors in the field for these areas. I was told that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than the ones I am interested in. Not very sure about how accurate this stuff is, so was wondering if anyone had any info :)

If there are other US universities that are better than the three I've mentioned in these areas, please suggest them :D

Thank you!


What you have heard is 100% true. NYU is the best Law school for public international Law and international taxation Law in the world. And it is still a top 6 Law school in the QS world rankings in Law. So you will get the best of the two worlds I guess. :)
[quote]Hi everyone!

I'm a lecturer in law at a university in Sri Lanka! I'm looking at applying to Harvard, NYU and Columbia for their next intake (2018-2019). I had a question that I was hoping for some help on though!

My main areas of interest are public law/constitutional law and human rights law. I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts of which of these three were best for these kinds of areas? By best I'm thinking of professors in the field, as well as in terms of seminars, internships, legal aid programs etc?

Based on what I've heard, NYU seems to have some of the best professors in the field for these areas. I was told that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than the ones I am interested in. Not very sure about how accurate this stuff is, so was wondering if anyone had any info :)

If there are other US universities that are better than the three I've mentioned in these areas, please suggest them :D

Thank you![/quote]

What you have heard is 100% true. NYU is the best Law school for public international Law and international taxation Law in the world. And it is still a top 6 Law school in the QS world rankings in Law. So you will get the best of the two worlds I guess. :)
quote
Thank you The will of fire! So would it be right to say that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than public law/human rights?

The other factor is classroom size, i suppose. Harvard is at 182, whereas NYU has 440!
Thank you The will of fire! So would it be right to say that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than public law/human rights?

The other factor is classroom size, i suppose. Harvard is at 182, whereas NYU has 440!
quote
Thank you The will of fire! So would it be right to say that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than public law/human rights?

The other factor is classroom size, i suppose. Harvard is at 182, whereas NYU has 440!


Yes I think Harvard is No.1 in corporates, then Columbia, and then NYU. The class size you are talking about isn't actually a "class" size, as both the 400 and 180 will be dispersed upon all courses with 2 and 3Ls. Accordingly, your class in both cases won't have 440 or 180 students, and it will be much smaller than that. Also, in terms of selectivity, Harvard wins. But don't confuse selectivity with the quality of admitted students which is almost the same at both institutions; as NYU Law is one of the biggest law schools in the US and thus, it admits a larger number of applicants. However, it is still selective in proportion to the number of applications it receives: around 2800. Notwithstanding this fact, I think the general vibe of Harvard's students might be a little more nerdy and snobby, while NYU's students are a little more fun and laid back. You can get a general grasp of students quality from median LSAT scores. In terms of externships and fun, NYU wins. The only thing that might look like draining NYU Law from its outstanding prestige is its parent university which is far behind Harvard and Columbia as parent universities in general. But don't be fooled, we are comparing Law schools here, not universities. And NYU Law is known to be one of the most prestigious in the US and the whole world.
Wish you the best of luck in making the right decision and choosing what best suits you!

[Edited by The will of fire on Apr 16, 2017]

[quote]Thank you The will of fire! So would it be right to say that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than public law/human rights?

The other factor is classroom size, i suppose. Harvard is at 182, whereas NYU has 440![/quote]

Yes I think Harvard is No.1 in corporates, then Columbia, and then NYU. The class size you are talking about isn't actually a "class" size, as both the 400 and 180 will be dispersed upon all courses with 2 and 3Ls. Accordingly, your class in both cases won't have 440 or 180 students, and it will be much smaller than that. Also, in terms of selectivity, Harvard wins. But don't confuse selectivity with the quality of admitted students which is almost the same at both institutions; as NYU Law is one of the biggest law schools in the US and thus, it admits a larger number of applicants. However, it is still selective in proportion to the number of applications it receives: around 2800. Notwithstanding this fact, I think the general vibe of Harvard's students might be a little more nerdy and snobby, while NYU's students are a little more fun and laid back. You can get a general grasp of students quality from median LSAT scores. In terms of externships and fun, NYU wins. The only thing that might look like draining NYU Law from its outstanding prestige is its parent university which is far behind Harvard and Columbia as parent universities in general. But don't be fooled, we are comparing Law schools here, not universities. And NYU Law is known to be one of the most prestigious in the US and the whole world.
Wish you the best of luck in making the right decision and choosing what best suits you!
quote
Hi everyone!

I'm a lecturer in law at a university in Sri Lanka! I'm looking at applying to Harvard, NYU and Columbia for their next intake (2018-2019). I had a question that I was hoping for some help on though!

My main areas of interest are public law/constitutional law and human rights law. I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts of which of these three were best for these kinds of areas? By best I'm thinking of professors in the field, as well as in terms of seminars, internships, legal aid programs etc?

Based on what I've heard, NYU seems to have some of the best professors in the field for these areas. I was told that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than the ones I am interested in. Not very sure about how accurate this stuff is, so was wondering if anyone had any info :)

If there are other US universities that are better than the three I've mentioned in these areas, please suggest them :D

Thank you!


I have similar interests as well and was wondering where do Penn, Michigan, and Berkeley fit within this paradigm. Any thoughts?
[quote]Hi everyone!

I'm a lecturer in law at a university in Sri Lanka! I'm looking at applying to Harvard, NYU and Columbia for their next intake (2018-2019). I had a question that I was hoping for some help on though!

My main areas of interest are public law/constitutional law and human rights law. I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts of which of these three were best for these kinds of areas? By best I'm thinking of professors in the field, as well as in terms of seminars, internships, legal aid programs etc?

Based on what I've heard, NYU seems to have some of the best professors in the field for these areas. I was told that Harvard's strength is corporate law, rather than the ones I am interested in. Not very sure about how accurate this stuff is, so was wondering if anyone had any info :)

If there are other US universities that are better than the three I've mentioned in these areas, please suggest them :D

Thank you![/quote]

I have similar interests as well and was wondering where do Penn, Michigan, and Berkeley fit within this paradigm. Any thoughts?
quote

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