Corporate Law LLM in the US after UK LLB


lloydy
Hi guys,

I'm currently in my penultimate year at the University of Warwick in the UK studying European Law and I wish to know if I potentially stand a chance to be accepted at a respected US uni to study for an LLM in, preferably, something along the lines of corporate & securities law.

Although my first year does not count, it still appears on my transcript. I obtained an average of 51% but had three grades below 50%.

In my second year I managed to obtain 61%, and I am realistically expecting to achieve approximately 65% overall on my degree as I'm doing great this year..

Do I stand any chance to be accepted at a respected US university? If yes, can anyone give precise names of uni where I should apply? It is worth noting that I have some significant work experience in the legal sector as I have worked in several law firms and I also have additional work experience.

Thanks guys!
Hi guys,

I'm currently in my penultimate year at the University of Warwick in the UK studying European Law and I wish to know if I potentially stand a chance to be accepted at a respected US uni to study for an LLM in, preferably, something along the lines of corporate & securities law.

Although my first year does not count, it still appears on my transcript. I obtained an average of 51% but had three grades below 50%.

In my second year I managed to obtain 61%, and I am realistically expecting to achieve approximately 65% overall on my degree as I'm doing great this year..

Do I stand any chance to be accepted at a respected US university? If yes, can anyone give precise names of uni where I should apply? It is worth noting that I have some significant work experience in the legal sector as I have worked in several law firms and I also have additional work experience.

Thanks guys!
quote
LLMing
Your work ex and internship are important. Irrespective to your grades ( they are not bad and Warwick is very reputed ) you are eligible to apply to ANY university. Admissions committe look at a reason to take you not reject you. Besides your essay ( be original ) and recommendation letters(minimum 2 academic professors teaching LLB + 1 or 2 from work is ok ) play a big role, grade are just a small part in the whole process.

Hope this helps. Good luck .
Your work ex and internship are important. Irrespective to your grades ( they are not bad and Warwick is very reputed ) you are eligible to apply to ANY university. Admissions committe look at a reason to take you not reject you. Besides your essay ( be original ) and recommendation letters(minimum 2 academic professors teaching LLB + 1 or 2 from work is ok ) play a big role, grade are just a small part in the whole process.

Hope this helps. Good luck .
quote
lloydy
Thanks for your feedback :) Definitely boosting my confidence to apply to some relatively good law schools then, maybe looking at fordham, NYU, ucla, chicago etc.

Any more feedback will be much appreciated :)
Thanks for your feedback :) Definitely boosting my confidence to apply to some relatively good law schools then, maybe looking at fordham, NYU, ucla, chicago etc.

Any more feedback will be much appreciated :)
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lloydy
anyone?
anyone?
quote
PetersM
Hi iglorsolini, this article here compares some of the best corporate/business LLM options:

[Spam deleted]
Hi iglorsolini, this article here compares some of the best corporate/business LLM options:

[Spam deleted]
quote
The article posted above is extremely dubious. It focuses on programmes which call themselves 'corporate/business' LLMs, as opposed to schools with a large number of high quality faculty members specializing in the area and which offer a wide range of corporate law courses. Put differently, the article focuses on brand, not substance. In the process, it takes three of the best corporate law faculties in the world (if not the best) - Harvard, Columbia and Oxford - and relegates them to second-tier status.

Columbia is the perfect example. In addition to John Coffee (who the article mentions as basically the only member of the Columbia faculty specializing in corporate law), the faculty includes Ron Gilson, Jeff Gordon, Merritt Fox, Katharina Pistor and others - all international heavyweights. Moreover, the 'Deals' course at Cambridge (which, again, the article specifically mentions) was modeled on the one developed by Ron Gilson and Vic Goldberg... at, wait for it, Columbia. A similar course is also offered as part of the Msc. in Law & Finance Programme at Oxford.

Moveover, the article completely glosses over the importance of the relationships between law and business schools in a world where the interactions between law and finance are at the cutting edge of research and teaching. Again, Harvard, Columbia and Oxford and well ahead of most of the schools mentioned on the list.

The bottom line? There are a lot of great resources out there about top quality corporate law LLMs and related programmes. This article is not one of them.

Best,

Paddy

*I should mention I am not a graduate of Columbia - the example just strikes me as one which shows how lacking the article is.
The article posted above is extremely dubious. It focuses on programmes which call themselves 'corporate/business' LLMs, as opposed to schools with a large number of high quality faculty members specializing in the area and which offer a wide range of corporate law courses. Put differently, the article focuses on brand, not substance. In the process, it takes three of the best corporate law faculties in the world (if not the best) - Harvard, Columbia and Oxford - and relegates them to second-tier status.

Columbia is the perfect example. In addition to John Coffee (who the article mentions as basically the only member of the Columbia faculty specializing in corporate law), the faculty includes Ron Gilson, Jeff Gordon, Merritt Fox, Katharina Pistor and others - all international heavyweights. Moreover, the 'Deals' course at Cambridge (which, again, the article specifically mentions) was modeled on the one developed by Ron Gilson and Vic Goldberg... at, wait for it, Columbia. A similar course is also offered as part of the Msc. in Law & Finance Programme at Oxford.

Moveover, the article completely glosses over the importance of the relationships between law and business schools in a world where the interactions between law and finance are at the cutting edge of research and teaching. Again, Harvard, Columbia and Oxford and well ahead of most of the schools mentioned on the list.

The bottom line? There are a lot of great resources out there about top quality corporate law LLMs and related programmes. This article is not one of them.

Best,

Paddy

*I should mention I am not a graduate of Columbia - the example just strikes me as one which shows how lacking the article is.
quote
Hi guys,

I'm currently in my penultimate year at the University of Warwick in the UK studying European Law and I wish to know if I potentially stand a chance to be accepted at a respected US uni to study for an LLM in, preferably, something along the lines of corporate & securities law.

Although my first year does not count, it still appears on my transcript. I obtained an average of 51% but had three grades below 50%.

In my second year I managed to obtain 61%, and I am realistically expecting to achieve approximately 65% overall on my degree as I'm doing great this year..

Do I stand any chance to be accepted at a respected US university? If yes, can anyone give precise names of uni where I should apply? It is worth noting that I have some significant work experience in the legal sector as I have worked in several law firms and I also have additional work experience.

Thanks guys!



Hi,

I also graduated from a university in Britain with a good 2.1. Will the LSAC consider the first year scores in evaluation even though they do not count?
<blockquote>Hi guys,

I'm currently in my penultimate year at the University of Warwick in the UK studying European Law and I wish to know if I potentially stand a chance to be accepted at a respected US uni to study for an LLM in, preferably, something along the lines of corporate & securities law.

Although my first year does not count, it still appears on my transcript. I obtained an average of 51% but had three grades below 50%.

In my second year I managed to obtain 61%, and I am realistically expecting to achieve approximately 65% overall on my degree as I'm doing great this year..

Do I stand any chance to be accepted at a respected US university? If yes, can anyone give precise names of uni where I should apply? It is worth noting that I have some significant work experience in the legal sector as I have worked in several law firms and I also have additional work experience.

Thanks guys!</blockquote>


Hi,

I also graduated from a university in Britain with a good 2.1. Will the LSAC consider the first year scores in evaluation even though they do not count?
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azhan
Hey

I also finished my LLB from warwick in 2011 and had applied in my final year of university. To prove it I can say that most of my lectures were in L3 opposite the library.

I had a 57% in my first year and a 61% in my second year and I applied to NYU, Georgetown and Duke. I had done a vac scheme in Clifford chance in summer of 2010 and had strong references.

However, I was rejected from all of them and I have realised that they place strong emphasis on work experience and the completion of your law degree. If they have to consider you for admission without it you generally require high firsts.

I am not trying to dissuade you, but be realistic about your chances.
Hey

I also finished my LLB from warwick in 2011 and had applied in my final year of university. To prove it I can say that most of my lectures were in L3 opposite the library.

I had a 57% in my first year and a 61% in my second year and I applied to NYU, Georgetown and Duke. I had done a vac scheme in Clifford chance in summer of 2010 and had strong references.

However, I was rejected from all of them and I have realised that they place strong emphasis on work experience and the completion of your law degree. If they have to consider you for admission without it you generally require high firsts.

I am not trying to dissuade you, but be realistic about your chances.
quote
lloydy
Thanks azhan.

This year I am really involved in societies and I'm also on the exec of the European law society. I also intend to apply for llms once I start my lpc and thus do the llm after the lpc and prior to starting my training contract (that is, if I manage to get one this year ...). Do you think that extra curriculars such as the one I jut mentioned, a lot of work experience (so far I worked with 3 city firms and in other non uk firms abroad) and having done the lpc will increase my chances ?
Thanks azhan.

This year I am really involved in societies and I'm also on the exec of the European law society. I also intend to apply for llms once I start my lpc and thus do the llm after the lpc and prior to starting my training contract (that is, if I manage to get one this year ...). Do you think that extra curriculars such as the one I jut mentioned, a lot of work experience (so far I worked with 3 city firms and in other non uk firms abroad) and having done the lpc will increase my chances ?
quote
dragon
Hi, Lloydy

Out of curiosity, did you manage to get into any of the US Law Schools you applied to for your LL.M? If so, which one?
Hi, Lloydy

Out of curiosity, did you manage to get into any of the US Law Schools you applied to for your LL.M? If so, which one?
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