Carrying your passport around


Hi everyone, been a lurker here for quite some time but only felt the need to ask a question now. I am set to take my LLM in the U.S. this coming Fall. I've been hearing a lot about immigration authorities accosting people and even saw a video of them asking people in line at a bus station if they were U.S citizens.

This isn't the venue for a lenghty debate on U.S. immigration policy, but I would like to ask the people from the US or those studying there now if they recommend carrying your passport w/ student visa all the time while in the U.S.

I usually do that (keep my passport on me all the time) when travelling for vacations, but I figured I wouldn't need to when actually residing/studying for a long period of time in the US. I would imagine it would be stressful to keep impt documents with me while doing mundane things like groceries or even just day/weekend trips to other cities or states. I would rather be safe than sorry however.

What would the wise thing to do be as a general rule? I also thought maybe your student ID would be enough but I'd like to get some advice all the same.
Hi everyone, been a lurker here for quite some time but only felt the need to ask a question now. I am set to take my LLM in the U.S. this coming Fall. I've been hearing a lot about immigration authorities accosting people and even saw a video of them asking people in line at a bus station if they were U.S citizens.

This isn't the venue for a lenghty debate on U.S. immigration policy, but I would like to ask the people from the US or those studying there now if they recommend carrying your passport w/ student visa all the time while in the U.S.

I usually do that (keep my passport on me all the time) when travelling for vacations, but I figured I wouldn't need to when actually residing/studying for a long period of time in the US. I would imagine it would be stressful to keep impt documents with me while doing mundane things like groceries or even just day/weekend trips to other cities or states. I would rather be safe than sorry however.

What would the wise thing to do be as a general rule? I also thought maybe your student ID would be enough but I'd like to get some advice all the same.
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LegalLife
Hi everyone, been a lurker here for quite some time but only felt the need to ask a question now. I am set to take my LLM in the U.S. this coming Fall. I've been hearing a lot about immigration authorities accosting people and even saw a video of them asking people in line at a bus station if they were U.S citizens.

This isn't the venue for a lenghty debate on U.S. immigration policy, but I would like to ask the people from the US or those studying there now if they recommend carrying your passport w/ student visa all the time while in the U.S.

I usually do that (keep my passport on me all the time) when travelling for vacations, but I figured I wouldn't need to when actually residing/studying for a long period of time in the US. I would imagine it would be stressful to keep impt documents with me while doing mundane things like groceries or even just day/weekend trips to other cities or states. I would rather be safe than sorry however.

What would the wise thing to do be as a general rule? I also thought maybe your student ID would be enough but I'd like to get some advice all the same.


Always carry your student ID. That is the evidence you need to show that you are lawfully in the country. No need for carrying around a passport but if you feel like it, carry a photocopy of your visa page on you.
[quote]Hi everyone, been a lurker here for quite some time but only felt the need to ask a question now. I am set to take my LLM in the U.S. this coming Fall. I've been hearing a lot about immigration authorities accosting people and even saw a video of them asking people in line at a bus station if they were U.S citizens.

This isn't the venue for a lenghty debate on U.S. immigration policy, but I would like to ask the people from the US or those studying there now if they recommend carrying your passport w/ student visa all the time while in the U.S.

I usually do that (keep my passport on me all the time) when travelling for vacations, but I figured I wouldn't need to when actually residing/studying for a long period of time in the US. I would imagine it would be stressful to keep impt documents with me while doing mundane things like groceries or even just day/weekend trips to other cities or states. I would rather be safe than sorry however.

What would the wise thing to do be as a general rule? I also thought maybe your student ID would be enough but I'd like to get some advice all the same.[/quote]

Always carry your student ID. That is the evidence you need to show that you are lawfully in the country. No need for carrying around a passport but if you feel like it, carry a photocopy of your visa page on you.
quote
Hi everyone, been a lurker here for quite some time but only felt the need to ask a question now. I am set to take my LLM in the U.S. this coming Fall. I've been hearing a lot about immigration authorities accosting people and even saw a video of them asking people in line at a bus station if they were U.S citizens.

This isn't the venue for a lenghty debate on U.S. immigration policy, but I would like to ask the people from the US or those studying there now if they recommend carrying your passport w/ student visa all the time while in the U.S.

I usually do that (keep my passport on me all the time) when travelling for vacations, but I figured I wouldn't need to when actually residing/studying for a long period of time in the US. I would imagine it would be stressful to keep impt documents with me while doing mundane things like groceries or even just day/weekend trips to other cities or states. I would rather be safe than sorry however.

What would the wise thing to do be as a general rule? I also thought maybe your student ID would be enough but I'd like to get some advice all the same.


Always carry your student ID. That is the evidence you need to show that you are lawfully in the country. No need for carrying around a passport but if you feel like it, carry a photocopy of your visa page on you.


Thank you, I will keep this in mind. :)
[quote][quote]Hi everyone, been a lurker here for quite some time but only felt the need to ask a question now. I am set to take my LLM in the U.S. this coming Fall. I've been hearing a lot about immigration authorities accosting people and even saw a video of them asking people in line at a bus station if they were U.S citizens.

This isn't the venue for a lenghty debate on U.S. immigration policy, but I would like to ask the people from the US or those studying there now if they recommend carrying your passport w/ student visa all the time while in the U.S.

I usually do that (keep my passport on me all the time) when travelling for vacations, but I figured I wouldn't need to when actually residing/studying for a long period of time in the US. I would imagine it would be stressful to keep impt documents with me while doing mundane things like groceries or even just day/weekend trips to other cities or states. I would rather be safe than sorry however.

What would the wise thing to do be as a general rule? I also thought maybe your student ID would be enough but I'd like to get some advice all the same.[/quote]

Always carry your student ID. That is the evidence you need to show that you are lawfully in the country. No need for carrying around a passport but if you feel like it, carry a photocopy of your visa page on you.[/quote]

Thank you, I will keep this in mind. :)
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JJ2017
If you are concerned, I recommend having a copy of your passport and visa with you in your wallet. I always carry a color photocopy of my passport in my wallet when I travel, in case I lose it or just need ID for any reason.
If you are concerned, I recommend having a copy of your passport and visa with you in your wallet. I always carry a color photocopy of my passport in my wallet when I travel, in case I lose it or just need ID for any reason.
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Wavshrdr
I would carry a copy of my passport with me. I have been in the US for several years now and not once has anyone (other than at a port of entry) asked me for my passport of "documents". Honestly I wouldn't mind if they did. Being a lawyer, I respect the rule of law. If you are in a country illegally, you are breaking the law. Just as if you were in someone's house without asking them, you are trespassing and breaking the law. Having been here for a few years now, I better understand why some Americans are upset. You either abide by the laws you don't. In my home country, if you don't follow the laws, you are a criminal. Just because I don't like a law, or don't want to follow it, doesn't mean I can do as I please.

This isn't about immigration but just the basic concept of following laws or not. That is why I became a lawyer is because I think laws help keep society from descending into chaos and laws matter. With respect to the police or other law enforcement here, they have always been very kind and treated me well whenever I have had any interaction with them. I never encountered anyone just randomly stopping me like they do in my home country.
I would carry a copy of my passport with me. I have been in the US for several years now and not once has anyone (other than at a port of entry) asked me for my passport of "documents". Honestly I wouldn't mind if they did. Being a lawyer, I respect the rule of law. If you are in a country illegally, you are breaking the law. Just as if you were in someone's house without asking them, you are trespassing and breaking the law. Having been here for a few years now, I better understand why some Americans are upset. You either abide by the laws you don't. In my home country, if you don't follow the laws, you are a criminal. Just because I don't like a law, or don't want to follow it, doesn't mean I can do as I please.

This isn't about immigration but just the basic concept of following laws or not. That is why I became a lawyer is because I think laws help keep society from descending into chaos and laws matter. With respect to the police or other law enforcement here, they have always been very kind and treated me well whenever I have had any interaction with them. I never encountered anyone just randomly stopping me like they do in my home country.
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