Need help Irish conversion to US GPA


YuriKawa
Heya I'm pretty much trying to organize a way for my sweetie to take classes in the US...she is from Ireland. The school requires a 2.0. What I'm confused over...is the point system in Ireland is only given out for the leaving cert...so is that what I'd use for the GPA? or would I calculate every single grade she ever got between junior cert and leaving cert? She tells me they don't even count grades except the junior and leaving cert...I'm really confused over this... One year she had to skip her final grades because of family abuse issues and having to be in social worker offices...but apparently because Ireland doesn't consider that year important they didn't have her take the tests over....How do I do this?
Heya I'm pretty much trying to organize a way for my sweetie to take classes in the US...she is from Ireland. The school requires a 2.0. What I'm confused over...is the point system in Ireland is only given out for the leaving cert...so is that what I'd use for the GPA? or would I calculate every single grade she ever got between junior cert and leaving cert? She tells me they don't even count grades except the junior and leaving cert...I'm really confused over this... One year she had to skip her final grades because of family abuse issues and having to be in social worker offices...but apparently because Ireland doesn't consider that year important they didn't have her take the tests over....How do I do this?
quote
irishguy
Ok, just to give you a bit of a breakdown of the Irish Educational system. We have primary school: Junior Infants, Senior Infants, 1st Class, 2nd Class, 3rd Class, 4th Class, 5th Class, 6th Class.
Then people move onto secondary school: 1st year, 2nd year, 3rd year (Junior Cert), 5th Year, 6th year (Leaving Cert).
Years ago the Junior Cert was very important because it was kind of like the English GCSE. Some people left school after the Junior Cert and it was important that they had some sort of qualification after their name. Nowadays it isn't really all that significant. It is not taken into account by employers as such and has no bearing on your college career.
4th year is optional and is called Transition Year, where people can do work experience and have an extra year to prepare for the Leaving Cartificate. The Leaving Cert is exceptionally important and is the way that places in Irish Universities are allocated. The results are also required for most job interviews. Like the Junior Cert it is administered by the State. It is the equivalent of the English A Level Exam. 4 A grades at A Level is supposedly the equivalent of 570/600 points at Leaving Cert Level, which to be honest is a bit of a joke considering but this is how it goes.
You can do as many subjects as you like, but generally people do 7 or 8. Your best 6 results are converted into points. The maximum is 600. The grades at Honours Level are as follows: A1 = 100pts; A2 = 90 pts; B1 = 85 pts ; B2 = 80 pts; B3 = 75pts; C1 = 70pts; C2 = 65pts; C3 = 60pts; D1 = 55pts etc. The conversion table can be found at www.cao.ie
If any of the subjects were taken at Pass Level, then the points start at 60 for an A1 and work downwards in the same progression.
You can also get the statistics for points on www.cao.ie
In the year I did my leaving cert, 0.2% of people achieved maximum points (600), 1.8% achieved points of 550 or higher and 5% achieved 500 points or higher.
You must also pass English, Irish and Maths and a foreign language in order to be admitted to any University which is a National University of Ireland College (NUI). This is pretty much all of them except Trinity, which do not enforce this requirement.

Places on University courses are allocated on the basis of points, therefore, if you get enough points you can do whatever you want, wherever you want. There are no interviews and subjectivity is taken out of the equasion completely. It is decided absolutely on merit and is an incredibly fair system. Medicine, Law, Pharmacy, and Veterinary Medicine are the highest points courses. To get into Medicine you must achieve 570 points or more, and for Law you must achieve 500 points or more.

However, these are merely post-primary qualifications, not Third Level (University), which is probably why you are having a difficulty converting it into a GPA. The Leaving Cert performs the same function as the SAT in Ireland. If she wants to take courses in a US Undergraduate College then I would imagine she will have to take the SAT and some SAT II's (though she may be exempt from the SAT II's because of her Leaving Cert).

If she has gone to college, the she will have results that read: (1.1); (2.1); (2.2); (3rd). These can be converted into a GPA and there are definitely sites out there that help with this.

IF you really are stuck with ONLY Leaving Cert Results, then calculate her points and look up the statistics for the year in which she did her Leaving Cert. Then Calculate the percentage of people who got similar points: e.g. in 2006 8% of people got 500pts or above. Thefore she would be in the 92nd percentile range. Then get an approximate GPA from this based on the percentage of people who get a particular grade range on the scale e.g. 3.0, 3.5, 4.0

Hope it works out.
Ok, just to give you a bit of a breakdown of the Irish Educational system. We have primary school: Junior Infants, Senior Infants, 1st Class, 2nd Class, 3rd Class, 4th Class, 5th Class, 6th Class.
Then people move onto secondary school: 1st year, 2nd year, 3rd year (Junior Cert), 5th Year, 6th year (Leaving Cert).
Years ago the Junior Cert was very important because it was kind of like the English GCSE. Some people left school after the Junior Cert and it was important that they had some sort of qualification after their name. Nowadays it isn't really all that significant. It is not taken into account by employers as such and has no bearing on your college career.
4th year is optional and is called Transition Year, where people can do work experience and have an extra year to prepare for the Leaving Cartificate. The Leaving Cert is exceptionally important and is the way that places in Irish Universities are allocated. The results are also required for most job interviews. Like the Junior Cert it is administered by the State. It is the equivalent of the English A Level Exam. 4 A grades at A Level is supposedly the equivalent of 570/600 points at Leaving Cert Level, which to be honest is a bit of a joke considering but this is how it goes.
You can do as many subjects as you like, but generally people do 7 or 8. Your best 6 results are converted into points. The maximum is 600. The grades at Honours Level are as follows: A1 = 100pts; A2 = 90 pts; B1 = 85 pts ; B2 = 80 pts; B3 = 75pts; C1 = 70pts; C2 = 65pts; C3 = 60pts; D1 = 55pts etc. The conversion table can be found at www.cao.ie
If any of the subjects were taken at Pass Level, then the points start at 60 for an A1 and work downwards in the same progression.
You can also get the statistics for points on www.cao.ie
In the year I did my leaving cert, 0.2% of people achieved maximum points (600), 1.8% achieved points of 550 or higher and 5% achieved 500 points or higher.
You must also pass English, Irish and Maths and a foreign language in order to be admitted to any University which is a National University of Ireland College (NUI). This is pretty much all of them except Trinity, which do not enforce this requirement.

Places on University courses are allocated on the basis of points, therefore, if you get enough points you can do whatever you want, wherever you want. There are no interviews and subjectivity is taken out of the equasion completely. It is decided absolutely on merit and is an incredibly fair system. Medicine, Law, Pharmacy, and Veterinary Medicine are the highest points courses. To get into Medicine you must achieve 570 points or more, and for Law you must achieve 500 points or more.

However, these are merely post-primary qualifications, not Third Level (University), which is probably why you are having a difficulty converting it into a GPA. The Leaving Cert performs the same function as the SAT in Ireland. If she wants to take courses in a US Undergraduate College then I would imagine she will have to take the SAT and some SAT II's (though she may be exempt from the SAT II's because of her Leaving Cert).

If she has gone to college, the she will have results that read: (1.1); (2.1); (2.2); (3rd). These can be converted into a GPA and there are definitely sites out there that help with this.

IF you really are stuck with ONLY Leaving Cert Results, then calculate her points and look up the statistics for the year in which she did her Leaving Cert. Then Calculate the percentage of people who got similar points: e.g. in 2006 8% of people got 500pts or above. Thefore she would be in the 92nd percentile range. Then get an approximate GPA from this based on the percentage of people who get a particular grade range on the scale e.g. 3.0, 3.5, 4.0

Hope it works out.
quote
irishguy
And she is correct, the years in between the State Exams are completely irrelevant. They are preparation for the State Exams. Any tests administered by the school are purely to prepare you for those exams and have no bearing on your allocation of college place. The only exams that count are the Junior Cert and the Leaving Cert.
And she is correct, the years in between the State Exams are completely irrelevant. They are preparation for the State Exams. Any tests administered by the school are purely to prepare you for those exams and have no bearing on your allocation of college place. The only exams that count are the Junior Cert and the Leaving Cert.
quote
YuriKawa
Ok...then...let's say someone took 7 classes...in 2006...1 (math) was an E and the rest were C's...would that still count as a 2.0?

How do they factor in lower levels? It says on the lower scale a 20 is a C...how is that all factored in towards GPA then...
> >
Ok...then...let's say someone took 7 classes...in 2006...1 (math) was an E and the rest were C's...would that still count as a 2.0?

How do they factor in lower levels? It says on the lower scale a 20 is a C...how is that all factored in towards GPA then...
> >
quote
Yellow
What age is she and what is she trying to do? Seriously get in touch with wherever she wants to get into. There is a way of converting Irish grades into a GPA but I have yet to see someone on this sort of website who managed to do so properly. The college she is thinking of applying to will be able to though. Also she presumably needs to do SAT's etc. This website is aimed at those who already have degrees or almost have degrees in law but there are others such as thestudentroom which have people applying to undergrad courses. I would also point out that Irish grades are on three levels foundation, ordinary and higher which adds to the difficulty in translating into a GPA and that if your hypothetical is right she failed maths at whatever level she did it.
What age is she and what is she trying to do? Seriously get in touch with wherever she wants to get into. There is a way of converting Irish grades into a GPA but I have yet to see someone on this sort of website who managed to do so properly. The college she is thinking of applying to will be able to though. Also she presumably needs to do SAT's etc. This website is aimed at those who already have degrees or almost have degrees in law but there are others such as thestudentroom which have people applying to undergrad courses. I would also point out that Irish grades are on three levels foundation, ordinary and higher which adds to the difficulty in translating into a GPA and that if your hypothetical is right she failed maths at whatever level she did it.
quote
Tadgh
Does anyone no what 300 CAO points converted into GPA?
Does anyone no what 300 CAO points converted into GPA?
quote

Reply to Post

Hot Discussions