Msc law and finance Queen Mary


troshi
Hello,

I have an offer from QMUL for the msc law and finance, I want to know if this program have a good reputation, especially in order to work in banking and finance law and in M&A in the UK or abroad. I'm also waiting for a decision from king's college for the LLM in international financial law, and I have an offer from QMUL for an LLM in banking and finance law. I want to know what are the differences between these 3 programs, and which one is the best to work in finance law ?

- Msc law and finance QMUL
- LLM banking and finance law QMUL
- LLM international financial law king's college

Thank you very much
Hello,

I have an offer from QMUL for the msc law and finance, I want to know if this program have a good reputation, especially in order to work in banking and finance law and in M&A in the UK or abroad. I'm also waiting for a decision from king's college for the LLM in international financial law, and I have an offer from QMUL for an LLM in banking and finance law. I want to know what are the differences between these 3 programs, and which one is the best to work in finance law ?

- Msc law and finance QMUL
- LLM banking and finance law QMUL
- LLM international financial law king's college

Thank you very much
quote
troshi
Anyone can help me with this ?
Anyone can help me with this ?
quote
Yuloasis
First thing to note about the 3 courses is that Law and Finance at QMUL is an Msc. This means it's going to take a completely different structure to the other 2, in that they're LLMs. It's difficult to comment on the employability aspect of the Msc because of this. You're bound to learn useful information and skills, and from their website it seems like you'll gain skills relevant to employment in the finance industry. Additonally, as part of the Msc you have to take one of the specified pathways laid out on this webpage: https://www.qmul.ac.uk/law/postgraduate/courses/items/139176.html. This is very different to the more open structure of the LLM, in which you chose from a number of modules related to banking and finance law.

My gut instinct is that if you're set in working in a legal sphere you should aim for the LLMs. They are obviously more law-focused and will allow you to specialise to a greater degree. Choosing between the two of them is largely a matter of preference. The Kings course is more internationally focused and the QMUL course will allow you to have a more inward national focus if you so chose.

It's also worth noting that according to LLM-Guide's research, gradutes of the LLM at Kings appear more often amongst the world's top law firms: https://llm-guide.com/articles/how-many-big-law-associates-and-partners-have-an-llm. This could be because the course has a better reputation, or it could be because Kings has better networking opportuinities; I don't know for sure.

The last thing to note is that if you're interested in a particular area of study, it's worth going through the staff profiles and seeing if there's anyone relevant to your interests at each of the unis. A dissertation is required for each of the courses you've mentioned, and that's going to be a lot easier if you're interested in it, and you've got a member of staff who is equally passionate and knowledgable.

Hope that helps.
First thing to note about the 3 courses is that Law and Finance at QMUL is an Msc. This means it's going to take a completely different structure to the other 2, in that they're LLMs. It's difficult to comment on the employability aspect of the Msc because of this. You're bound to learn useful information and skills, and from their website it seems like you'll gain skills relevant to employment in the finance industry. Additonally, as part of the Msc you have to take one of the specified pathways laid out on this webpage: https://www.qmul.ac.uk/law/postgraduate/courses/items/139176.html. This is very different to the more open structure of the LLM, in which you chose from a number of modules related to banking and finance law.

My gut instinct is that if you're set in working in a legal sphere you should aim for the LLMs. They are obviously more law-focused and will allow you to specialise to a greater degree. Choosing between the two of them is largely a matter of preference. The Kings course is more internationally focused and the QMUL course will allow you to have a more inward national focus if you so chose.

It's also worth noting that according to LLM-Guide's research, gradutes of the LLM at Kings appear more often amongst the world's top law firms: https://llm-guide.com/articles/how-many-big-law-associates-and-partners-have-an-llm. This could be because the course has a better reputation, or it could be because Kings has better networking opportuinities; I don't know for sure.

The last thing to note is that if you're interested in a particular area of study, it's worth going through the staff profiles and seeing if there's anyone relevant to your interests at each of the unis. A dissertation is required for each of the courses you've mentioned, and that's going to be a lot easier if you're interested in it, and you've got a member of staff who is equally passionate and knowledgable.

Hope that helps.
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troshi
But the fact of studying finance in addition to law in the msc law and finance doesn't add value to students doing this degree ? especially in order to work in capital markets and corporate law ?
But the fact of studying finance in addition to law in the msc law and finance doesn't add value to students doing this degree ? especially in order to work in capital markets and corporate law ?
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