LSE, UCL or KCL LLM?


Wolfenix
Dear all,

I have applied to undertake LLM programs at LSE, UCL and KCL, and (surprisingly enough) I received offers from all 3. Evidently this is a good thing, but I have been struggling to decide which program to take.

I have been reading about rankings, forums and reviews, but I would nonetheless greatly appreciate any guidance or opinion you could give on this matter.

Some personal info:

1. I am Chilean, so I am not familiar with the "public consideration" of these Universities in the UK, US or EU. I also do not expect to have a "life changing experience" in terms of academics, since I will probably come back to Chile after my studies, and the legal system is obviously very different.

2. I am going with my wife (we are both 28), whom also got accepted into all 3 programs. I guess this means that we are probably interested in a more "friendly" environment, which hopefully leaves some time to travel and get to know the UK and Europe.

3. As I said, I have reviewed the rankings, but ARWU, Times and QS differ on their opinion of these Universities, and even on the ranking on legal programs.

4. I do not intend to obtain a degree on a specific area (such as finance or corporate), but rather take the courses I find more interesting.

In sum: I would really appreciate any enlightment you may give me on this issue, and especially, not only focused on "prestige" or academic tradition (which of course is very important), but also in terms of the life experience (location, campuses, other activities, environment and student profile, etc.).

Sorry for the long post, thank you very much for your time and I look forward to your replies!
Dear all,

I have applied to undertake LLM programs at LSE, UCL and KCL, and (surprisingly enough) I received offers from all 3. Evidently this is a good thing, but I have been struggling to decide which program to take.

I have been reading about rankings, forums and reviews, but I would nonetheless greatly appreciate any guidance or opinion you could give on this matter.

Some personal info:

1. I am Chilean, so I am not familiar with the "public consideration" of these Universities in the UK, US or EU. I also do not expect to have a "life changing experience" in terms of academics, since I will probably come back to Chile after my studies, and the legal system is obviously very different.

2. I am going with my wife (we are both 28), whom also got accepted into all 3 programs. I guess this means that we are probably interested in a more "friendly" environment, which hopefully leaves some time to travel and get to know the UK and Europe.

3. As I said, I have reviewed the rankings, but ARWU, Times and QS differ on their opinion of these Universities, and even on the ranking on legal programs.

4. I do not intend to obtain a degree on a specific area (such as finance or corporate), but rather take the courses I find more interesting.

In sum: I would really appreciate any enlightment you may give me on this issue, and especially, not only focused on "prestige" or academic tradition (which of course is very important), but also in terms of the life experience (location, campuses, other activities, environment and student profile, etc.).

Sorry for the long post, thank you very much for your time and I look forward to your replies!
quote
beicon
First, congrats on the offers.

I can give you some insider trading on UCL and KCL. I went to UCL, whereas my fiancee went to KCL.

It all kinda depends on what you wanna study. I wanted to focus on public international law and environment, hence UCL. It seemed like the best choice for what I wanted to centre on. My fiancee wanted criminology, so KCL looked like the best choice.

On the programs, I can tell you that yout both univeristies seemed very "friendly", especially as regards people, events and socializing in general. I gotta say that neither one of us attended much of the events organized by the law school or the student union. However, that was strictly our fault as there were many on offer.

We are both from Latin America and I had only been to Europe once before the start of the program. And only in Portugal. So we're both also very keen on taking the most out of the chance of getting to travel around the continent. We choose the modules in a way that we always had Mondays and Fridays off. So we always had a long weekend to look forward to. That allowed us to get around quite a lot. We went to 10 different countries in one year.

And, despite all the travelling, we still found the time to study, write essays and dissertations and take the exams. So, it kinda depends on the modules you chose.

Regarding academic prestige, the only thing I can say is that in the UK the impression that I had is that UCL is regarded as probably the best law school in London. I'm not just saying that 'cause that where I went to in the end. I can quote this one day when I went with my fiancee to a KCL get-together. I talked to three KCL LLM students, all of whom were born, raised and educated in the UK. They all said UCL is regarded as the best law school in London. And I also talked to lawyer at magic circle law firms, from the London offices of such firms, about the LLM program. They all said the same thing. UCL would be the best choice.

Of course, it also depends on what you wanna focus on module-wise. It's useless to go to UCL if all the modules you got some sort of interest in are only offered elsewhere.

Hope I've been of some help.

Let me know if you've got anything else to ask.
First, congrats on the offers.

I can give you some insider trading on UCL and KCL. I went to UCL, whereas my fiancee went to KCL.

It all kinda depends on what you wanna study. I wanted to focus on public international law and environment, hence UCL. It seemed like the best choice for what I wanted to centre on. My fiancee wanted criminology, so KCL looked like the best choice.

On the programs, I can tell you that yout both univeristies seemed very "friendly", especially as regards people, events and socializing in general. I gotta say that neither one of us attended much of the events organized by the law school or the student union. However, that was strictly our fault as there were many on offer.

We are both from Latin America and I had only been to Europe once before the start of the program. And only in Portugal. So we're both also very keen on taking the most out of the chance of getting to travel around the continent. We choose the modules in a way that we always had Mondays and Fridays off. So we always had a long weekend to look forward to. That allowed us to get around quite a lot. We went to 10 different countries in one year.

And, despite all the travelling, we still found the time to study, write essays and dissertations and take the exams. So, it kinda depends on the modules you chose.

Regarding academic prestige, the only thing I can say is that in the UK the impression that I had is that UCL is regarded as probably the best law school in London. I'm not just saying that 'cause that where I went to in the end. I can quote this one day when I went with my fiancee to a KCL get-together. I talked to three KCL LLM students, all of whom were born, raised and educated in the UK. They all said UCL is regarded as the best law school in London. And I also talked to lawyer at magic circle law firms, from the London offices of such firms, about the LLM program. They all said the same thing. UCL would be the best choice.

Of course, it also depends on what you wanna focus on module-wise. It's useless to go to UCL if all the modules you got some sort of interest in are only offered elsewhere.

Hope I've been of some help.

Let me know if you've got anything else to ask.
quote
Wolfenix
Thanks a lot for your reply, it sure is extremely useful!!!

Could you tell me a bit about the differences between UCL and KCL location-wise? I've heard that the Faculty of Law in UCL does not have very good facilities, whereas KCL should be opening East Wing of Somerset House soon (though I don't know whether the Faculty of Law would operate there)...

It would seem as if KCL is considerably better located than UCL, and has better facilities...

Also, did you and your wife apply to Housing from one of the Universities, or did you go for private housing?

Thanks a lot, you are certainly most helpful!
Thanks a lot for your reply, it sure is extremely useful!!!

Could you tell me a bit about the differences between UCL and KCL location-wise? I've heard that the Faculty of Law in UCL does not have very good facilities, whereas KCL should be opening East Wing of Somerset House soon (though I don't know whether the Faculty of Law would operate there)...

It would seem as if KCL is considerably better located than UCL, and has better facilities...

Also, did you and your wife apply to Housing from one of the Universities, or did you go for private housing?

Thanks a lot, you are certainly most helpful!
quote
I'm also deciding about which school to go to.
I believe one good question to be asked is this:
Is anyone who has received an offer from LSE going to decline it in favor of UCL or KCL???
How often did this happen in past years?
I'm also deciding about which school to go to.
I believe one good question to be asked is this:
Is anyone who has received an offer from LSE going to decline it in favor of UCL or KCL???
How often did this happen in past years?
quote
Wolfenix
To be honest, I hold offers from all 3, and I am more enthusiast about UCL and King's than LSE. Clearly I have not made my mind yet, but I might eventually choose UCL or King's over LSE.
To be honest, I hold offers from all 3, and I am more enthusiast about UCL and King's than LSE. Clearly I have not made my mind yet, but I might eventually choose UCL or King's over LSE.
quote
Ok Wolfenix, that's the honest kind of answer I was expecting, for the reasons you stated in the opening post.
I myself am intending to go to LSE, but that's only because I've read several times in this forum that it's supposed to be the most prestigious of them all.
So, other answers to this post, from people who really had a chance to choose (where accepted in all of them), would really help.
Ok Wolfenix, that's the honest kind of answer I was expecting, for the reasons you stated in the opening post.
I myself am intending to go to LSE, but that's only because I've read several times in this forum that it's supposed to be the most prestigious of them all.
So, other answers to this post, from people who really had a chance to choose (where accepted in all of them), would really help.
quote
Beicon's was also an honest answer, regarding both schools he referred to (UCL and KCL). Thanks!
Beicon's was also an honest answer, regarding both schools he referred to (UCL and KCL). Thanks!
quote
Grapes
Thanks a lot for your reply, it sure is extremely useful!!!

Could you tell me a bit about the differences between UCL and KCL location-wise? I've heard that the Faculty of Law in UCL does not have very good facilities, whereas KCL should be opening East Wing of Somerset House soon (though I don't know whether the Faculty of Law would operate there)...



Hello! I'm currently a student at King's. Yeah King's just opened the west wing of Somerset house. The entire school already moved but we are going to have the opening ceremony in February. The building looks really good and obviously new as they just finished refurbishing. Students room, meeting rooms, common rooms, a big moot room and all that is present.
The Maughan library is also a hidden gem of King's. It's an amazing library and I will truly miss it.

UCL is a great school, I have some friends who are graduating with me who are going to continue at UCL. If you have a preference for European / comparative law then King's is the place for you. UCL is really good in international law, both public and private.

King's has also an amazing student union, one of the biggest and in general the atmosphere is great. The students union owns a pub, a club and several other facilities all in the same building at strand.
Don't know about UCL so can't say..

In any case.. where ever you end up it'd be a very good experience :)
<blockquote>Thanks a lot for your reply, it sure is extremely useful!!!

Could you tell me a bit about the differences between UCL and KCL location-wise? I've heard that the Faculty of Law in UCL does not have very good facilities, whereas KCL should be opening East Wing of Somerset House soon (though I don't know whether the Faculty of Law would operate there)...

</blockquote>

Hello! I'm currently a student at King's. Yeah King's just opened the west wing of Somerset house. The entire school already moved but we are going to have the opening ceremony in February. The building looks really good and obviously new as they just finished refurbishing. Students room, meeting rooms, common rooms, a big moot room and all that is present.
The Maughan library is also a hidden gem of King's. It's an amazing library and I will truly miss it.

UCL is a great school, I have some friends who are graduating with me who are going to continue at UCL. If you have a preference for European / comparative law then King's is the place for you. UCL is really good in international law, both public and private.

King's has also an amazing student union, one of the biggest and in general the atmosphere is great. The students union owns a pub, a club and several other facilities all in the same building at strand.
Don't know about UCL so can't say..

In any case.. where ever you end up it'd be a very good experience :)
quote
Wolfenix
Thanks a lot for your reply, Grapes!

Will you also have the taught modules in Somerset? I wonder if this is an issue to be considered anyway... UCL seems a little further, and I've seen comments about the Law building and library being a bit old.

Also, in terms of housing, are you staying in Uni housing, or private renting?

Thanks!
Thanks a lot for your reply, Grapes!

Will you also have the taught modules in Somerset? I wonder if this is an issue to be considered anyway... UCL seems a little further, and I've seen comments about the Law building and library being a bit old.

Also, in terms of housing, are you staying in Uni housing, or private renting?

Thanks!
quote
Grapes
I think the lectures will still be held at the Strand campus (which is right in front of Somerset house). The School of law is at Somerset, so professors' offices, the administration, meeting rooms, common rooms and so on. Maybe you could have tutorials there but don't rely too much on it.

I lived in halls in my first year, then rented out an apartment with friends since.
I think the lectures will still be held at the Strand campus (which is right in front of Somerset house). The School of law is at Somerset, so professors' offices, the administration, meeting rooms, common rooms and so on. Maybe you could have tutorials there but don't rely too much on it.

I lived in halls in my first year, then rented out an apartment with friends since.
quote
beicon
Thanks a lot for your reply, it sure is extremely useful!!!

Could you tell me a bit about the differences between UCL and KCL location-wise? I've heard that the Faculty of Law in UCL does not have very good facilities, whereas KCL should be opening East Wing of Somerset House soon (though I don't know whether the Faculty of Law would operate there)...

It would seem as if KCL is considerably better located than UCL, and has better facilities...

Also, did you and your wife apply to Housing from one of the Universities, or did you go for private housing?

Thanks a lot, you are certainly most helpful!


Locationwise KCL and UCL aren't that different in my opinion. When I first went to London, one year before starting the program, I visited both universities and had the impression that KCL was more centrally located. But that impression went away after I started living there.
Of course, KCL's just opened up their new facilities which I'm sure must be cutting edge. UCL's are a bit dated, but the faculty building and the area (Bloomsbury) has its charms... it's a nice place, less crowded than where KCL is. And, to be quite honest, if you end up living in a central location in Zone 1, both will be either within walking distance or a short underground ride away. Also the central campus, which is very close to the faculty, is nice. The main library, in my humble opinion, is very good and beautiful. Gotta say though that KCL's main library is also really nice...
I didn't apply for housing. We went for a private accommodation provider (www.unite-student.com). Kinda pricy but I can definitely recommend. I stayed at Kirby Street. You can easily walk in to class... 15 minutes' walk to KCL and 25-30 minutes' walk to UCL. If you go to UCL, like I did, and doesn't wanna walk (after all, London isn't known for having clear skies all year round, eh!?) you can take the underground at Farringdon (3-5 minutes' walk from Kirby Street) and get off at Euston Square, which is two stops away from Farringdon. And Euston Square is kinda 5 minutes' walk from Endsleigh Gardens where the Faculty of Law is. Piece of cake...
Let me know if I can help you guys any further.
<blockquote>Thanks a lot for your reply, it sure is extremely useful!!!

Could you tell me a bit about the differences between UCL and KCL location-wise? I've heard that the Faculty of Law in UCL does not have very good facilities, whereas KCL should be opening East Wing of Somerset House soon (though I don't know whether the Faculty of Law would operate there)...

It would seem as if KCL is considerably better located than UCL, and has better facilities...

Also, did you and your wife apply to Housing from one of the Universities, or did you go for private housing?

Thanks a lot, you are certainly most helpful!</blockquote>

Locationwise KCL and UCL aren't that different in my opinion. When I first went to London, one year before starting the program, I visited both universities and had the impression that KCL was more centrally located. But that impression went away after I started living there.
Of course, KCL's just opened up their new facilities which I'm sure must be cutting edge. UCL's are a bit dated, but the faculty building and the area (Bloomsbury) has its charms... it's a nice place, less crowded than where KCL is. And, to be quite honest, if you end up living in a central location in Zone 1, both will be either within walking distance or a short underground ride away. Also the central campus, which is very close to the faculty, is nice. The main library, in my humble opinion, is very good and beautiful. Gotta say though that KCL's main library is also really nice...
I didn't apply for housing. We went for a private accommodation provider (www.unite-student.com). Kinda pricy but I can definitely recommend. I stayed at Kirby Street. You can easily walk in to class... 15 minutes' walk to KCL and 25-30 minutes' walk to UCL. If you go to UCL, like I did, and doesn't wanna walk (after all, London isn't known for having clear skies all year round, eh!?) you can take the underground at Farringdon (3-5 minutes' walk from Kirby Street) and get off at Euston Square, which is two stops away from Farringdon. And Euston Square is kinda 5 minutes' walk from Endsleigh Gardens where the Faculty of Law is. Piece of cake...
Let me know if I can help you guys any further.
quote
Wolfenix
Thanks a bunch beicon!!! Really, really great help!

I am really considering UCL, specially because the offer on courses is considerably broader and varied... in this regard, I also do not know any of the professor teaching the courses (although I have been reading their resumées and trying to find more about them), could you maybe recommend some courses or professors?

I understand than nonetheless one does have the chance, in the first 2 weeks, to attend various classes and then choose your courses, but I would still like some insider information if possible!

I am not looking to specialize in any area, but rather take a "general" LLM (I have found interesting all the economy and history related courses, such as Economic Analysis of Law, Historical Development of Common Law, Role of Economics in Competition Law, etc.).

I am also very interested in International Law, so if you could give me some pointers, or some "do's and dont's", I'd be very grateful!!!
Thanks a bunch beicon!!! Really, really great help!

I am really considering UCL, specially because the offer on courses is considerably broader and varied... in this regard, I also do not know any of the professor teaching the courses (although I have been reading their resumées and trying to find more about them), could you maybe recommend some courses or professors?

I understand than nonetheless one does have the chance, in the first 2 weeks, to attend various classes and then choose your courses, but I would still like some insider information if possible!

I am not looking to specialize in any area, but rather take a "general" LLM (I have found interesting all the economy and history related courses, such as Economic Analysis of Law, Historical Development of Common Law, Role of Economics in Competition Law, etc.).

I am also very interested in International Law, so if you could give me some pointers, or some "do's and dont's", I'd be very grateful!!!
quote
beicon
Thanks a bunch beicon!!! Really, really great help!

I am really considering UCL, specially because the offer on courses is considerably broader and varied... in this regard, I also do not know any of the professor teaching the courses (although I have been reading their resumées and trying to find more about them), could you maybe recommend some courses or professors?

I understand than nonetheless one does have the chance, in the first 2 weeks, to attend various classes and then choose your courses, but I would still like some insider information if possible!

I am not looking to specialize in any area, but rather take a "general" LLM (I have found interesting all the economy and history related courses, such as Economic Analysis of Law, Historical Development of Common Law, Role of Economics in Competition Law, etc.).

I am also very interested in International Law, so if you could give me some pointers, or some "do's and dont's", I'd be very grateful!!!


I'm glad I can help!!

About the modules, I did international environmental law, economic analysis of law, international criminal law, law and policy of climate change and international human rights.

Economic analysis of law: great. The lecturer is great and the topic is very interesting. The seminars are a bit packed, but nevertheless the modules is a good choice, all things considered. I choose do to my dissertation in this module, so I can't comment on the exam.

Int. Environmental Law: the topic, in my opinion, is interesting. The main lecturer, Ms. Redgwell is great... the only problem is that she passes most of the lectures on to other members of the faculty staff... you end up having almost only 3 or 4 seminars with her and the remainder is done by supporting staff. Some are good, some are boring as hell... all 'n all I think this would only be a good choice if you're really into international environmental law. The exam wasn't that difficult. If you did the essential readings and revised before the exam, you were fine.

Climate change: same thing as economic analysis of law, the only difference is that it isn't packed at all. This gives you the chance to partake in the discussion in much more depth.

Human rights: avoid it. The italian chick responsible for this modules is one of the worst lecturers I've seen... boring... the topic is kinda intersting, but the seminars are terrible. As regards the exam, same thing as int. env. law.

Int. Criminal Law: good choice. The lecturers were good and the topic was interesting overall. The exam was pretty much the same as int. env. law.

hope this helps!
<blockquote>Thanks a bunch beicon!!! Really, really great help!

I am really considering UCL, specially because the offer on courses is considerably broader and varied... in this regard, I also do not know any of the professor teaching the courses (although I have been reading their resumées and trying to find more about them), could you maybe recommend some courses or professors?

I understand than nonetheless one does have the chance, in the first 2 weeks, to attend various classes and then choose your courses, but I would still like some insider information if possible!

I am not looking to specialize in any area, but rather take a "general" LLM (I have found interesting all the economy and history related courses, such as Economic Analysis of Law, Historical Development of Common Law, Role of Economics in Competition Law, etc.).

I am also very interested in International Law, so if you could give me some pointers, or some "do's and dont's", I'd be very grateful!!!</blockquote>

I'm glad I can help!!

About the modules, I did international environmental law, economic analysis of law, international criminal law, law and policy of climate change and international human rights.

Economic analysis of law: great. The lecturer is great and the topic is very interesting. The seminars are a bit packed, but nevertheless the modules is a good choice, all things considered. I choose do to my dissertation in this module, so I can't comment on the exam.

Int. Environmental Law: the topic, in my opinion, is interesting. The main lecturer, Ms. Redgwell is great... the only problem is that she passes most of the lectures on to other members of the faculty staff... you end up having almost only 3 or 4 seminars with her and the remainder is done by supporting staff. Some are good, some are boring as hell... all 'n all I think this would only be a good choice if you're really into international environmental law. The exam wasn't that difficult. If you did the essential readings and revised before the exam, you were fine.

Climate change: same thing as economic analysis of law, the only difference is that it isn't packed at all. This gives you the chance to partake in the discussion in much more depth.

Human rights: avoid it. The italian chick responsible for this modules is one of the worst lecturers I've seen... boring... the topic is kinda intersting, but the seminars are terrible. As regards the exam, same thing as int. env. law.

Int. Criminal Law: good choice. The lecturers were good and the topic was interesting overall. The exam was pretty much the same as int. env. law.

hope this helps!
quote
Seneca
Dear Wolfenix
I am a current student at King's (from Switzerland where I am admitted to the Bar; taken a PhD as well) and I can really agree to what has been posted above concerning UCL/KCL. I declined my offer from LSE due to its bad reputation (have a look on the reports on Ghadaffi's son! http://www.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/woolf/pdf/woolfReport.pdf) and the poor variety of lectures. Friends of mine who currently study at LSE are not happy at all, because all is focused on finance law. Furthermore, the lectures/method of teaching are more in a seminar style (typically for a university in the field of economy) and the lessons are often prepared and presented by fellow students. For £ 14'000 pounds I prefer being taught by leading Professors, Lord Judges and experienced practitioners AND NOT BY FELLOW STUDENTS! Go for UCL or King's. Both universities have a close cooperation! The only difference are the class mates: UCL students mainly stem from the US and Asia; KCL students are mostly from the Continent!
I hope, this helps!
Dear Wolfenix
I am a current student at King's (from Switzerland where I am admitted to the Bar; taken a PhD as well) and I can really agree to what has been posted above concerning UCL/KCL. I declined my offer from LSE due to its bad reputation (have a look on the reports on Ghadaffi's son! http://www.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/woolf/pdf/woolfReport.pdf) and the poor variety of lectures. Friends of mine who currently study at LSE are not happy at all, because all is focused on finance law. Furthermore, the lectures/method of teaching are more in a seminar style (typically for a university in the field of economy) and the lessons are often prepared and presented by fellow students. For £ 14'000 pounds I prefer being taught by leading Professors, Lord Judges and experienced practitioners AND NOT BY FELLOW STUDENTS! Go for UCL or King's. Both universities have a close cooperation! The only difference are the class mates: UCL students mainly stem from the US and Asia; KCL students are mostly from the Continent!
I hope, this helps!
quote
Aethra
I just wanted to thank everyone who's been giving information on these 3 schools! I've been reading this thread since it started and you guys have helped me as well.
I just wanted to thank everyone who's been giving information on these 3 schools! I've been reading this thread since it started and you guys have helped me as well.
quote
Wolfenix
Thanks a lot for your input, Seneca! LSE is really my least favorite right now. I know it is a good school, and is a lot more renowned in the US and South America (where I come from), but I don't feel much comfortable with its "profile"... also, I'm thinking of doing International (Public) Law.

Thus, so far, it seems that UCL is the best option for me!
Thanks a lot for your input, Seneca! LSE is really my least favorite right now. I know it is a good school, and is a lot more renowned in the US and South America (where I come from), but I don't feel much comfortable with its "profile"... also, I'm thinking of doing International (Public) Law.

Thus, so far, it seems that UCL is the best option for me!
quote
psyfi
I declined my offer from LSE due to its bad reputation (have a look on the reports on Ghadaffi's son! http://www.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/woolf/pdf/woolfReport.pdf) and the poor variety of lectures. Friends of mine who currently study at LSE are not happy at all, because all is focused on finance law. Furthermore, the lectures/method of teaching are more in a seminar style (typically for a university in the field of economy) and the lessons are often prepared and presented by fellow students. For £ 14'000 pounds I prefer being taught by leading Professors, Lord Judges and experienced practitioners AND NOT BY FELLOW STUDENTS!


Anyone who has actually been/is at LSE can support this view, at least concerning the lecturing by students? Seneca's reputation statement is rather silly, and variety of subjects at LSE is wide, too.
<blockquote> I declined my offer from LSE due to its bad reputation (have a look on the reports on Ghadaffi's son! http://www.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/woolf/pdf/woolfReport.pdf) and the poor variety of lectures. Friends of mine who currently study at LSE are not happy at all, because all is focused on finance law. Furthermore, the lectures/method of teaching are more in a seminar style (typically for a university in the field of economy) and the lessons are often prepared and presented by fellow students. For £ 14'000 pounds I prefer being taught by leading Professors, Lord Judges and experienced practitioners AND NOT BY FELLOW STUDENTS!
</blockquote>

Anyone who has actually been/is at LSE can support this view, at least concerning the lecturing by students? Seneca's reputation statement is rather silly, and variety of subjects at LSE is wide, too.
quote
rkarthik87
I declined my offer from LSE due to its bad reputation (have a look on the reports on Ghadaffi's son! http://www.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/woolf/pdf/woolfReport.pdf) and the poor variety of lectures. Friends of mine who currently study at LSE are not happy at all, because all is focused on finance law. Furthermore, the lectures/method of teaching are more in a seminar style (typically for a university in the field of economy) and the lessons are often prepared and presented by fellow students. For £ 14'000 pounds I prefer being taught by leading Professors, Lord Judges and experienced practitioners AND NOT BY FELLOW STUDENTS!


Anyone who has actually been/is at LSE can support this view, at least concerning the lecturing by students? Seneca's reputation statement is rather silly, and variety of subjects at LSE is wide, too.


with regard to lectures at lse i have heard good reviews from my friends who have studied and presently studying at lse... infact in India it is considered as the best option in UK after oxbridge.... also i have also heard better reviews about qmul in comparison to ucl and kings....
<blockquote><blockquote> I declined my offer from LSE due to its bad reputation (have a look on the reports on Ghadaffi's son! http://www.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/woolf/pdf/woolfReport.pdf) and the poor variety of lectures. Friends of mine who currently study at LSE are not happy at all, because all is focused on finance law. Furthermore, the lectures/method of teaching are more in a seminar style (typically for a university in the field of economy) and the lessons are often prepared and presented by fellow students. For £ 14'000 pounds I prefer being taught by leading Professors, Lord Judges and experienced practitioners AND NOT BY FELLOW STUDENTS!
</blockquote>

Anyone who has actually been/is at LSE can support this view, at least concerning the lecturing by students? Seneca's reputation statement is rather silly, and variety of subjects at LSE is wide, too.</blockquote>

with regard to lectures at lse i have heard good reviews from my friends who have studied and presently studying at lse... infact in India it is considered as the best option in UK after oxbridge.... also i have also heard better reviews about qmul in comparison to ucl and kings....
quote
tintirita
Hi all,

I have been accepted at QM and KCL so far, still waiting for UCL.
I want to do an LLM in banking and finance, or something similar.
QM has a programme in Banking and Finance Law, KCL has a programme in International Financial Law (other option coul be International Business Law) and UCL has a programme in Internatinal Banking and Finance Law.

Which one do you think is better and why? I can't find much information online. Also, I am from Argentina and not sure yet about what to do after completing my LLM.

Kind regards,
Natalia
Hi all,

I have been accepted at QM and KCL so far, still waiting for UCL.
I want to do an LLM in banking and finance, or something similar.
QM has a programme in Banking and Finance Law, KCL has a programme in International Financial Law (other option coul be International Business Law) and UCL has a programme in Internatinal Banking and Finance Law.

Which one do you think is better and why? I can't find much information online. Also, I am from Argentina and not sure yet about what to do after completing my LLM.

Kind regards,
Natalia
quote
Wolfenix
Hi tintirita,

You say you are from Argentina, which UK University (after Oxbridge, of course) would you say is more renowned there?

So far I really like UCL a lot more than LSE, but I have to say that LSE if far better known in Chile (where I come from)...

I know that is a strong fact to consider, but I really wouldn't like my decision to be based purely in the fact that LSE is better known in my country than UCL or KCL...
Hi tintirita,

You say you are from Argentina, which UK University (after Oxbridge, of course) would you say is more renowned there?

So far I really like UCL a lot more than LSE, but I have to say that LSE if far better known in Chile (where I come from)...

I know that is a strong fact to consider, but I really wouldn't like my decision to be based purely in the fact that LSE is better known in my country than UCL or KCL...
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

London, United Kingdom 546 Followers 838 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 473 Followers 844 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 631 Followers 853 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 684 Followers 768 Discussions

Related Articles

The LL.M. in Intellectual Property Law

By V. Wish on Sep 16, 2007

More Articles

Hot Discussions