Intercollegiate LLM To End


manu74

very kind from you!!!!!

Yes, Turkued told me that QM is well recognised for IP. I was wondering, as I haven't applyed to QM so far, if UCL is also to be considered for IP. I send my application a copuple of of days ago, how long does it take to get an answer?

ciao

very kind from you!!!!!

Yes, Turkued told me that QM is well recognised for IP. I was wondering, as I haven't applyed to QM so far, if UCL is also to be considered for IP. I send my application a copuple of of days ago, how long does it take to get an answer?

ciao
quote
manu74

Ah, another question....

I took the toefl last year in the US. I only have an "official" certificate, I mean, the one they send to my adress... I'm sending out "copies", is that enough or do they require a certified copy? If yes, how do I get it?

merci beaucoup!!!!

Ah, another question....

I took the toefl last year in the US. I only have an "official" certificate, I mean, the one they send to my adress... I'm sending out "copies", is that enough or do they require a certified copy? If yes, how do I get it?

merci beaucoup!!!!
quote
Ronin

As reagards the timing of your application, you will receive in one month approximatively an acknowledgement of receipt of your application. This paper will say wether or not your file has been received complete, and states an accurate date when UCL will make a decision about your application. So keep this paper preciously as it contains also your number of application (useful when you phone to them).

I don't know if you need a certified copy. For the avoidance of the doubt, try to obtain one. "Mairies" in France provide such service quit easily in Paris, but I don't know if the same is true in Province. Anyway, do not send the original !

To all others : It seems that KCL wants to withdraw from the Intercollegiate program, but it is still a (strong) rumor. I don't know an official position saying that. I have asked to UCL staff, they said me something like "no comment, we are not in touch".

As reagards the timing of your application, you will receive in one month approximatively an acknowledgement of receipt of your application. This paper will say wether or not your file has been received complete, and states an accurate date when UCL will make a decision about your application. So keep this paper preciously as it contains also your number of application (useful when you phone to them).

I don't know if you need a certified copy. For the avoidance of the doubt, try to obtain one. "Mairies" in France provide such service quit easily in Paris, but I don't know if the same is true in Province. Anyway, do not send the original !

To all others : It seems that KCL wants to withdraw from the Intercollegiate program, but it is still a (strong) rumor. I don't know an official position saying that. I have asked to UCL staff, they said me something like "no comment, we are not in touch".
quote
fknandrew

I agree w/ Turkued. Though I am still a prospective student, looking through their different websites has made me realize how good an intercollegiate LLM would be. I have subjects of particular interest in various colleges.

On an aside, is there anyone here who applied, or is applying ti UCL? I am in the process of applying on-line and I have a few questions about some of its parts.

While I'm at it, is UCL (as opposed to Kings, SOAS, and LSE) good with human rights, legal theory and public law?

I agree w/ Turkued. Though I am still a prospective student, looking through their different websites has made me realize how good an intercollegiate LLM would be. I have subjects of particular interest in various colleges.

On an aside, is there anyone here who applied, or is applying ti UCL? I am in the process of applying on-line and I have a few questions about some of its parts.

While I'm at it, is UCL (as opposed to Kings, SOAS, and LSE) good with human rights, legal theory and public law?
quote
Johnson

UCL is very good at legal theory and public law.

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/experts/index.shtml

Regarding human rights, I do not know. However, there is a specialisation in human rights law.

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/prospective/llm/index.shtml?llm_specdegree

UCL is very good at legal theory and public law.

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/experts/index.shtml

Regarding human rights, I do not know. However, there is a specialisation in human rights law.

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/prospective/llm/index.shtml?llm_specdegree

quote
fknandrew

Thanks Johnson. I will put that into consideration. Has there been any news with regard to ending of Intercollegiate LLM? The SOAS website still requires its students to take at LEAST 2 subjects in SOAS, which means they can take subjects in the other colleges.

Thanks Johnson. I will put that into consideration. Has there been any news with regard to ending of Intercollegiate LLM? The SOAS website still requires its students to take at LEAST 2 subjects in SOAS, which means they can take subjects in the other colleges.
quote
C.Miller

Has there been any news with regard to ending of Intercollegiate LLM?


"October 2006 was the final date for registration for the LLM under the Regulations for the LLM Degree for Internal Students. The final date for examination under these Regulations will be in session 2008-9. Part-time students should have received from their College of registration information about completing their course of study.

From October 2007 each College will be offering its own LLM programmes. "

http://www.london.ac.uk/95.html

!

<blockquote> Has there been any news with regard to ending of Intercollegiate LLM? </blockquote>

"October 2006 was the final date for registration for the LLM under the Regulations for the LLM Degree for Internal Students. The final date for examination under these Regulations will be in session 2008-9. Part-time students should have received from their College of registration information about completing their course of study.

From October 2007 each College will be offering its own LLM programmes. "

http://www.london.ac.uk/95.html

!
quote
fknandrew

I was about to post the same link!

What are the implications of this? UCL will be issuing a UCL diploma instead of a University of London Diploma. Would there not be repercussions? Considering that technically no one would have heard of a UCL diploma as of 2007 since UCL graduates of the past get a UL diploma. Won't employers wonder what UCL is? Wont the dif. colleges start from scratch in building their reputations again, at least in terms of the weight of the diploma?

I was about to post the same link!

What are the implications of this? UCL will be issuing a UCL diploma instead of a University of London Diploma. Would there not be repercussions? Considering that technically no one would have heard of a UCL diploma as of 2007 since UCL graduates of the past get a UL diploma. Won't employers wonder what UCL is? Wont the dif. colleges start from scratch in building their reputations again, at least in terms of the weight of the diploma?
quote
P_Martini

***
"To those of you thinking about doing the London LLM please be advised next year is the last year to do it."
***

Contrary to the first post in this thread (above), I suppose that those of us planning to go to London next year will not be able to follow the Intercollegiate LLM?

Also, would anyone who is currently studying at King's, Queen Mary, UCL or LSE care to comment on the library facilities? I am most interested in King's and LSE . . . .

Thank you.

P. Martini

***
"To those of you thinking about doing the London LLM please be advised next year is the last year to do it."
***

Contrary to the first post in this thread (above), I suppose that those of us planning to go to London next year will not be able to follow the Intercollegiate LLM?

Also, would anyone who is currently studying at King's, Queen Mary, UCL or LSE care to comment on the library facilities? I am most interested in King's and LSE . . . .

Thank you.

P. Martini
quote
Turkued

Having completed the LLM last year and having enjoyed all of the library facilities...

U.C.L.: Fairly small legal collection; usually have what they claim to have; helpful staff.

K.C.L.: Good place to study; adequate collection, although items often missing; very UNhelpful staff.

Q.M.U.L.: Collection is very undergraduate course oriented; dreadful building, helpful staff.

L.S.E.: Best of the uni's; longer opening hours, best designed building, crowded.

You'll be spending a lot of your time at I.A.L.S. which has the largest UoL legal collection.

Hidden gem: the Senate House legal collection. Rarely used by LLM students, books often in pristine shape, great place to study.

Having completed the LLM last year and having enjoyed all of the library facilities...

U.C.L.: Fairly small legal collection; usually have what they claim to have; helpful staff.

K.C.L.: Good place to study; adequate collection, although items often missing; very UNhelpful staff.

Q.M.U.L.: Collection is very undergraduate course oriented; dreadful building, helpful staff.

L.S.E.: Best of the uni's; longer opening hours, best designed building, crowded.

You'll be spending a lot of your time at I.A.L.S. which has the largest UoL legal collection.

Hidden gem: the Senate House legal collection. Rarely used by LLM students, books often in pristine shape, great place to study.
quote
FleurDuMal

***
"To those of you thinking about doing the London LLM please be advised next year is the last year to do it."
***

Contrary to the first post in this thread (above), I suppose that those of us planning to go to London next year will not be able to follow the Intercollegiate LLM?

Also, would anyone who is currently studying at King's, Queen Mary, UCL or LSE care to comment on the library facilities? I am most interested in King's and LSE . . . .

Thank you.

P. Martini


I'm a King's undergrad and couldn't be happier with the library facilities. Clean, quiet, well built, attractive building, plenty of computer facilities (printing is a rip off, but I guess that's the same everywhere) and postgrads can get there own individual study cubicle if they're that way inclined (I personally think that's a bit of a lonely way to play out your existence). The collection has it's strengths and weaknesses, though too many books are on four week loans. Certain books won't be touched all year, and then suddenly a tutor will hand out suggested bibliography for an essay, and every book is out till way past the essay deadline. It may only be a small class, but one person is often all it takes.

However, with the ability to use all the libraries in UoL, that's not really a problem. LSE library is excellent, especially for when you need something more theory based given their emphasis on political studies. IALS is also very useful, as is Senate House (if not suffering from crippling underfunding...I don't think it's long for this world). I've never used UCL or QM libraries. As a last resort, you can always go to the British Library on Euston Road, which has pretty much everything.

There aren't many places in the UK, or even the world, where you have the potential to get your hands on so many books. What the hell would you do if you needed a book not in the library at somewhere like Keele or Warwick?!

<blockquote>***
"To those of you thinking about doing the London LLM please be advised next year is the last year to do it."
***

Contrary to the first post in this thread (above), I suppose that those of us planning to go to London next year will not be able to follow the Intercollegiate LLM?

Also, would anyone who is currently studying at King's, Queen Mary, UCL or LSE care to comment on the library facilities? I am most interested in King's and LSE . . . .

Thank you.

P. Martini</blockquote>

I'm a King's undergrad and couldn't be happier with the library facilities. Clean, quiet, well built, attractive building, plenty of computer facilities (printing is a rip off, but I guess that's the same everywhere) and postgrads can get there own individual study cubicle if they're that way inclined (I personally think that's a bit of a lonely way to play out your existence). The collection has it's strengths and weaknesses, though too many books are on four week loans. Certain books won't be touched all year, and then suddenly a tutor will hand out suggested bibliography for an essay, and every book is out till way past the essay deadline. It may only be a small class, but one person is often all it takes.

However, with the ability to use all the libraries in UoL, that's not really a problem. LSE library is excellent, especially for when you need something more theory based given their emphasis on political studies. IALS is also very useful, as is Senate House (if not suffering from crippling underfunding...I don't think it's long for this world). I've never used UCL or QM libraries. As a last resort, you can always go to the British Library on Euston Road, which has pretty much everything.

There aren't many places in the UK, or even the world, where you have the potential to get your hands on so many books. What the hell would you do if you needed a book not in the library at somewhere like Keele or Warwick?!
quote
lmwoods

What the hell would you do if you needed a book not in the library at somewhere like Keele or Warwick?!

Use the interlibrary loan system

<blockquote>What the hell would you do if you needed a book not in the library at somewhere like Keele or Warwick?!</blockquote>
Use the interlibrary loan system
quote
C.Miller

What the hell would you do if you needed a book not in the library at somewhere like Keele or Warwick?!


Many of the "new" areas of law covered in an LL.M (such as IP, IT, Medical Ethics on Edinburgh's LL.M Innovation, Technology and the Law) rely more on journals than books. Students studying via distance learning are not disadvantaged by their lack of proximity to a law library. Everything they require is available online. And for on-campus students the same can be said. No matter how great a library book collection is, it's not an essential consideration for every LL.M subject, so don't forget to ask about an institution's access to online collections.

<blockquote> What the hell would you do if you needed a book not in the library at somewhere like Keele or Warwick?!</blockquote>

Many of the "new" areas of law covered in an LL.M (such as IP, IT, Medical Ethics on Edinburgh's LL.M Innovation, Technology and the Law) rely more on journals than books. Students studying via distance learning are not disadvantaged by their lack of proximity to a law library. Everything they require is available online. And for on-campus students the same can be said. No matter how great a library book collection is, it's not an essential consideration for every LL.M subject, so don't forget to ask about an institution's access to online collections.
quote
Turkued

Also ask whether interlibrary loan facilities are available to LLM students.

LLM students are not considered research students. As such, at QMUL last year we were not given interlibrary loan privleges.

It was very frustrating trying to do an essay that comprised 25% of my course of study without access to IL loans while undergrads had no such problem.

Don't assume anything.

Also ask whether interlibrary loan facilities are available to LLM students.

LLM students are not considered research students. As such, at QMUL last year we were not given interlibrary loan privleges.

It was very frustrating trying to do an essay that comprised 25% of my course of study without access to IL loans while undergrads had no such problem.

Don't assume anything.
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

London, United Kingdom 853 Followers 835 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 717 Followers 896 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 535 Followers 880 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 75 Followers 172 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 701 Followers 893 Discussions

Other Related Content

LL.M. Application Deadlines for Fall 2020 - Law Schools in the UK & Ireland

News Sep 30, 2019

On Choosing Courses

Blog In LSE LL.M. 2019-2020 on Feb 27, 2020

Hot Discussions