Getting into Irish Law School


xamorphia
I am an American student who is set to begin an undergraduate program this year here in the States. Following my graduation, I will probably be moving to Ireland. What I am wondering is how you go about getting a law degree in Ireland, or rather, how you are admitted to a law program. Is there something I should be studying here in preperation? What do they require from international students?

Keep in mind that I pretty much know nothing at this point. I'm just getting started with figuring out what I need to be doing and what not.

Thanks.
I am an American student who is set to begin an undergraduate program this year here in the States. Following my graduation, I will probably be moving to Ireland. What I am wondering is how you go about getting a law degree in Ireland, or rather, how you are admitted to a law program. Is there something I should be studying here in preperation? What do they require from international students?

Keep in mind that I pretty much know nothing at this point. I'm just getting started with figuring out what I need to be doing and what not.

Thanks.
quote
Jimmy2
Hi. Basically in Ireland like in the United Kingdom law is predominantely an undergraduate academic programme. So you are more than entitled to apply now.

The leading Law schools in Ireland are Trinity College and the National Universities of Ireland i.e University College Dublin(UCD), UCC (Cork) and NUIG Galway. The reputation of all these institutions is excellent and there is little variance in their admittance requirements if at all. Generally students wishing to be admitted need to have over 500 points (irish grading system), which basically correlates to those in the top 7%(or higher) of the annual Leaving Certificate examiantion (SAT equivalent). However in Ireland undergraduate studies is free for Irish students, so apparently admissions requirements are much lower for foreign students due to the amount of revenue they generate through tuition fees. This is probably more true now than ever- as Ireland is in a serious recession!

The above universities offer either the llb/bcl degrees which are the equivalent of a US JD. the duration of the course is three years or 4 in the case of trinity. However as in the US one has to do a brief stint at professional law school after graduation before one is qualified to work as a lawyer.

Of course you could apply to study one of the above programmes as a mature student after your undergraduate course in the US but if your sure you want to study law it probably makes more sense financially to apply now. That is unless you want 6 years at university! The closing date for irish undergraduate applications is Feb 1 for courses commencing 09/010. Applications can be made online through the central applications board: www.cao.ie

Currently those qualified in Ireland can practice in the UK and are elegible to also sit the New York Bar exams. If you have any other questions feel free to PM me.

Good luck
J
Hi. Basically in Ireland like in the United Kingdom law is predominantely an undergraduate academic programme. So you are more than entitled to apply now.

The leading Law schools in Ireland are Trinity College and the National Universities of Ireland i.e University College Dublin(UCD), UCC (Cork) and NUIG Galway. The reputation of all these institutions is excellent and there is little variance in their admittance requirements if at all. Generally students wishing to be admitted need to have over 500 points (irish grading system), which basically correlates to those in the top 7%(or higher) of the annual Leaving Certificate examiantion (SAT equivalent). However in Ireland undergraduate studies is free for Irish students, so apparently admissions requirements are much lower for foreign students due to the amount of revenue they generate through tuition fees. This is probably more true now than ever- as Ireland is in a serious recession!

The above universities offer either the llb/bcl degrees which are the equivalent of a US JD. the duration of the course is three years or 4 in the case of trinity. However as in the US one has to do a brief stint at professional law school after graduation before one is qualified to work as a lawyer.

Of course you could apply to study one of the above programmes as a mature student after your undergraduate course in the US but if your sure you want to study law it probably makes more sense financially to apply now. That is unless you want 6 years at university! The closing date for irish undergraduate applications is Feb 1 for courses commencing 09/010. Applications can be made online through the central applications board: www.cao.ie

Currently those qualified in Ireland can practice in the UK and are elegible to also sit the New York Bar exams. If you have any other questions feel free to PM me.

Good luck
J
quote
xamorphia
Thanks! I also wondered, what if I had a law degree in the States and then decided to move to Ireland? Is there some kind of transfer process that would allow me to get certification in Ireland? Would I have to have x years experience as a practicing lawyer here first?
Thanks! I also wondered, what if I had a law degree in the States and then decided to move to Ireland? Is there some kind of transfer process that would allow me to get certification in Ireland? Would I have to have x years experience as a practicing lawyer here first?
quote
What you first need to know is that in Ireland the legal professional is split into two factions- the Bar where one becomes a Barrister (legal advocate) or where one becomes a Solicitor. If you have a standard American Law Degree you can apply to to train as either a Solicitor or a Barrister. Solicitors are trained and governed by The Law Society of Ireland at Blackhall Place in Dublin and Cork. You must first complete some preliminary exams before being allowed enter Blackhall (think of it as law school). These 8 prelim exams are called the FE1's (Final Examinations Part 1) and are examined in Irish Law of Contract, Law of Torts, Property/Land Law, European Union Law, Company Law, Criminal Law and Constitutional Law. When you are sucessfull you then begin your PPC 1 course at Blackhall, whilst you also work as a trainee solicitor in a law firm of which you have been sucessful in applying to. After PPC 1 comes PPC 2 and then your final exams- you're then entered into the roll of Solicitors. So all in all it takes around 2.5 years after graduation to become a Solicitor.

Training of Barristers is overseen by the Honorable Society of King's Inns in Dublin, like Blackhall there are prelim exams and then once sucessful you undertake a year long BL (Barrister of Law Degree), after sucessfully completing the degree you're called to the Bar. You must then fulfill a one to two year pupillage or devilling with an experienced Barrister (the first year of such must be in Dublin and you don't get paid!) After your pupilage you will be a qualified Barrister.

Check out kingsinns.ie and lawsociety.ie for further info.

Most Universities in Ireland will accept foreign primary law degrees, be sure to check Trinity's law website and UCD's. UCC's and NUI Galway's.

Hope the above helps!
What you first need to know is that in Ireland the legal professional is split into two factions- the Bar where one becomes a Barrister (legal advocate) or where one becomes a Solicitor. If you have a standard American Law Degree you can apply to to train as either a Solicitor or a Barrister. Solicitors are trained and governed by The Law Society of Ireland at Blackhall Place in Dublin and Cork. You must first complete some preliminary exams before being allowed enter Blackhall (think of it as law school). These 8 prelim exams are called the FE1's (Final Examinations Part 1) and are examined in Irish Law of Contract, Law of Torts, Property/Land Law, European Union Law, Company Law, Criminal Law and Constitutional Law. When you are sucessfull you then begin your PPC 1 course at Blackhall, whilst you also work as a trainee solicitor in a law firm of which you have been sucessful in applying to. After PPC 1 comes PPC 2 and then your final exams- you're then entered into the roll of Solicitors. So all in all it takes around 2.5 years after graduation to become a Solicitor.

Training of Barristers is overseen by the Honorable Society of King's Inns in Dublin, like Blackhall there are prelim exams and then once sucessful you undertake a year long BL (Barrister of Law Degree), after sucessfully completing the degree you're called to the Bar. You must then fulfill a one to two year pupillage or devilling with an experienced Barrister (the first year of such must be in Dublin and you don't get paid!) After your pupilage you will be a qualified Barrister.

Check out kingsinns.ie and lawsociety.ie for further info.

Most Universities in Ireland will accept foreign primary law degrees, be sure to check Trinity's law website and UCD's. UCC's and NUI Galway's.

Hope the above helps!
quote
wasp
Best Universities to study law in Ireland are University College Dublin and Trinity College Dublin.
The former is the only University in Ireland that has the degree law with economics, which is a major in law and a minor in economics.
Thus it is arguably the best degree available in Ireland.
Having an undergraduate BCL (bachelor of Law) exempts you from sitting certain exams in Blackhall as mentioned supra.
Best Universities to study law in Ireland are University College Dublin and Trinity College Dublin.
The former is the only University in Ireland that has the degree law with economics, which is a major in law and a minor in economics.
Thus it is arguably the best degree available in Ireland.
Having an undergraduate BCL (bachelor of Law) exempts you from sitting certain exams in Blackhall as mentioned supra.
quote

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